Full Online Books
BOOK CATEGORIES
Authors Authors Short Stories Short Stories Long Stories Long Stories Funny Stories Funny Stories Love Stories Love Stories Stories For Kids Stories For Kids Poems Poems Essays Essays Nonfictions Nonfictions Plays Plays Folktales Folktales Fairy Tales Fairy Tales Fables Fables Learning Kitchen Learning Kitchen
LINKS
Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional Free Classified Website Without Registration Free Classified Website Daniel Company
Twitter Twitter Add book
donate
Full Online Book HomeAuthor George Bernard ShawPage 1
Famous Authors (View All Authors)

Mrs. Warren's Profession - Act 1 Mrs. Warren's Profession - Act 1

Mrs. Warren's Profession - Act 1
ACT I(Summer afternoon in a cottage garden on the eastern slope of a hill a little south of Haslemere in Surrey. Looking up the hill, the cottage is seen in the left hand corner of the garden, with its thatched roof and porch, and a large latticed window to the left of the porch. A paling completely shuts in the garden, except for a gate on the right. The common rises uphill beyond the paling to the sky line. Some folded canvas garden chairs are leaning against the side bench in the porch. A lady's bicycle is propped against the wall,... Plays - Post by : raleigh123 - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Bernard Shaw - Read : 3213

Mrs. Warren's Profession - The Author's Apology Mrs. Warren's Profession - The Author's Apology

Mrs. Warren's Profession - The Author's Apology
Mrs Warren's Profession has been performed at last, after a delay of only eight years; and I have once more shared with Ibsen the triumphant amusement of startling all but the strongest-headed of the London theatre critics clean out of the practice of their profession. No author who has ever known the exultation of sending the Press into an hysterical tumult of protest, of moral panic, of involuntary and frantic confession of sin, of a horror of conscience in which the power of distinguishing between the work of art on the stage and the real life of the spectator is confused... Plays - Post by : raleigh123 - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Bernard Shaw - Read : 2348

Great Catherine - Scene 4 Great Catherine - Scene 4

Great Catherine - Scene 4
The Fourth Scene(A triangular recess communicating by a heavily curtained arch with the huge ballroom of the palace. The light is subdued by red shades on the candles. In the wall adjoining that pierced by the arch is a door. The only piece of furniture is a very handsome chair on the arch side. In the ballroom they are dancing a polonaise to the music of a brass band.)(Naryshkin enters through the door, followed by the soldiers carrying Edstaston, still trussed to the pole. Exhausted and dogged, he makes no sound.)NARYSHKIN. Halt. Get that pole clear of the prisoner. (They dump... Plays - Post by : raleigh123 - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Bernard Shaw - Read : 705

Great Catherine - Scene 3 Great Catherine - Scene 3

Great Catherine - Scene 3
The Third Scene(In a terrace garden overlooking the Neva. Claire, a robust young English lady, is leaning on the river wall. She turns expectantly on hearing the garden gate opened and closed. Edstaston hurries in. With a cry of delight she throws her arms round his neck.)CLAIRE. Darling!EDSTASTON (making a wry face). Don't call me darling.CLAIRE (amazed and chilled). Why?EDSTASTON. I have been called darling all the morning.CLAIRE (with a flash of jealousy). By whom?EDSTASTON. By everybody. By the most unutterable swine. And if we do not leave this abominable city now: do you hear? now; I shall be called darling... Plays - Post by : raleigh123 - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Bernard Shaw - Read : 2765

Great Catherine - Scene 2 Great Catherine - Scene 2

Great Catherine - Scene 2
The Second Scene(The Empress's petit lever. The central doors are closed. Those who enter through them find on their left, on a dais of two broad steps, a magnificent curtained bed. Beyond it a door in the panelling leads to the Empress's cabinet. Near the foot of the bed, in the middle of the room, stands a gilt chair, with the Imperial arms carved and the Imperial monogram embroidered.The Court is in attendance, standing in two melancholy rows down the side of the room opposite to the bed, solemn, bored, waiting for the Empress to awaken. The Princess Dashkoff, with two... Plays - Post by : raleigh123 - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Bernard Shaw - Read : 2354

Great Catherine - Scene 1 Great Catherine - Scene 1

Great Catherine - Scene 1
The First Scene(1776. Patiomkin in his bureau in the Winter Palace, St. Petersburgh. Huge palatial apartment: style, Russia in the eighteenth century imitating the Versailles du Roi Soleil. Extravagant luxury. Also dirt and disorder.Patiomkin, gigantic in stature and build, his face marred by the loss of one eye and a marked squint in the other, sits at the end of a table littered with papers and the remains of three or four successive breakfasts. He has supplies of coffee and brandy at hand sufficient for a party of ten. His coat, encrusted with diamonds, is on the floor. It has fallen... Plays - Post by : raleigh123 - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Bernard Shaw - Read : 1364

Great Catherine - The Author's Apology For Great Catherine Great Catherine - The Author's Apology For Great Catherine

Great Catherine - The Author's Apology For Great Catherine
Exception has been taken to the title of this seeming tomfoolery on the ground that the Catherine it represents is not Great Catherine, but the Catherine whose gallantries provide some of the lightest pages of modern history. Great Catherine, it is said, was the Catherine whose diplomacy, whose campaigns and conquests, whose plans of Liberal reform, whose correspondence with Grimm and Voltaire enabled her to cut such a magnificent figure in the eighteenth century. In reply, I can only confess that Catherine's diplomacy and her conquests do not interest me. It is clear to me that neither she nor the statesmen... Plays - Post by : raleigh123 - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Bernard Shaw - Read : 1648

Getting Married - Preface Getting Married - Preface

Getting Married - Preface
(Transcriber's Note -- The edition from which this play was taken was printed without most contractions, such as dont for don't and so forth. These have been left as printed in the original text. Also, abbreviated honorifics have no trailing period, and the word show is spelt shew.)GETTING MARRIEDBernard Shaw1908THE REVOLT AGAINST MARRIAGEThere is no subject on which more dangerous nonsense is talked and thought than marriage. If the mischief stopped at talking and thinking it would be bad enough; but it goes further, into disastrous anarchical action. Because our marriage law is inhuman and unreasonable to the point of downright... Plays - Post by : raleigh123 - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Bernard Shaw - Read : 2199

Fanny's First Play - Epilogue Fanny's First Play - Epilogue

Fanny's First Play - Epilogue
(Before the curtain. The Count, dazed and agitated, hurries to the 4 critics, as they rise, bored and weary, from their seats.) THE COUNT. Gentlemen: do not speak to me. I implore you to withhold your opinion. I am not strong enough to bear it. I could never have believed it. Is this a play? Is this in any sense of the word, Art? Is it agreeable? Can it conceivably do good to any human being? Is it delicate? Do such people really exist? Excuse me, gentlemen: I... Plays - Post by : raleigh123 - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Bernard Shaw - Read : 2103

Fanny's First Play - Act 3 Fanny's First Play - Act 3

Fanny's First Play - Act 3
ACT III(Again in the Gilbeys' dining-room. Afternoon. The table is not laid: it is draped in its ordinary cloth, with pen and ink, an exercise-book, and school-books on it. Bobby Gilbey is in the arm-chair, crouching over the fire, reading an illustrated paper. He is a pretty youth, of very suburban gentility, strong and manly enough by nature, but untrained and unsatisfactory, his parents having imagined that domestic restriction is what they call "bringing up." He has learnt nothing from it except a habit of evading it by deceit.) (He gets up to ring the bell;... Plays - Post by : raleigh123 - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Bernard Shaw - Read : 3258

Fanny's First Play - Act 2 Fanny's First Play - Act 2

Fanny's First Play - Act 2
ACT II(On the afternoon of the same day, Mrs Knox is writing notes in her drawing-room, at a writing-table which stands against the wall. Anyone placed so as to see Mrs Knox's left profile, will have the door on the right and the window an the left, both further away than Mrs Knox, whose back is presented to an obsolete upright piano at the opposite side of the room. The sofa is near the piano. There is a small table in the middle of the room, with some gilt-edged books and albums on it, and chairs near it.) (Mr... Plays - Post by : raleigh123 - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Bernard Shaw - Read : 2179

Fanny's First Play - Act 1 Fanny's First Play - Act 1

Fanny's First Play - Act 1
ACT I(In the dining-room of a house in Denmark Hill, an elderly lady sits at breakfast reading the newspaper. Her chair is at the end of the oblong dining-table furthest from the fire. There is an empty chair at the other end. The fireplace is behind this chair; and the door is next the fireplace, between it and the corner. An arm-chair stands beside the coal-scuttle. In the middle of the back wall is the sideboard, parallel to the table. The rest of the furniture is mostly dining-room chairs, ranged against the walls, and including... Plays - Post by : raleigh123 - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Bernard Shaw - Read : 2345

Fanny's First Play - Induction Fanny's First Play - Induction

Fanny's First Play - Induction
(The end of a saloon in an old-fashioned country house (Florence Towers, the property of Count O'Dowda) has been curtained off to form a stage for a private theatrical performance. A footman in grandiose Spanish livery enters before the curtain, on its O.P. side.) FOOTMAN. (announcing) Mr Cecil Savoyard. (Cecil Savoyard comes in: a middle-aged man in evening dress and a fur-lined overcoat. He is surprised to find nobody to receive him. So is the Footman). Oh, beg pardon, sir: I thought the Count was here. He was when I took... Plays - Post by : raleigh123 - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Bernard Shaw - Read : 602

Fanny's First Play - Preface To Fanny's First Play Fanny's First Play - Preface To Fanny's First Play

Fanny's First Play - Preface To Fanny's First Play
FANNY'S FIRST PLAY BY BERNARD SHAW 1911 (Notes on the editing: Shaw intentionally spelled many words according to a non-standard system. For example, "don't" is given as "dont" (without apostrophe), "Dr." is given as "Dr" (without a period at the end), and "Shakespeare" is given as "Shakespear" (no "e" at the end). Where several characters in the play are speaking at once, I have indicated it with vertical bars ("|"). The pound (currency) symbol has been replaced by the word "pounds".)Fanny's First Play, being but a potboiler, needs no preface. But its lesson is not, I... Plays - Post by : raleigh123 - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Bernard Shaw - Read : 979

The Philanderer - Act 4 The Philanderer - Act 4

The Philanderer - Act 4
ACT IVSitting-room in Paramore's apartments in Savile Row.The darkly respectable furniture is, so to speak, ensuite with Paramore's frock coat and cuffs. Viewing theroom from the front windows, the door is seen in theopposite wall near the left hand corner. Another door,a light, noiseless partition one covered with a greenbaize, is in the right hand wall toward the back,leading to Paramore's consulting room. The fireplace ison the left. At the nearest corner of it a couch isplaced at right angles to the wall, settlewise. On theright the wall is occupied by a bookcase, furtherforward than the green baize door. Beyond the... Plays - Post by : tonyscott - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Bernard Shaw - Read : 2256

The Philanderer - Act 3 The Philanderer - Act 3

The Philanderer - Act 3
ACT III(Still the library. Ten minutes later. Julia, angry andmiserable, comes in from the dining room, followed byCraven. She crosses the room tormentedly, and throwsherself into a chair.) CRAVEN (impatiently). What is the matter? Has everyone gone mad to-day? What do you mean by suddenly getting up from the table and tearing away like that? What does Paramore mean by reading his paper and not answering when he's spoken to? (Julia writhes impatiently.) Come, come (tenderly): won't my pet tell her own father what-- (irritably) what the devil is wrong with everybody? Do pull yourself straight, Julia, before Cuthbertson comes. He's only... Plays - Post by : tonyscott - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Bernard Shaw - Read : 2205

The Philanderer - Act 2 The Philanderer - Act 2

The Philanderer - Act 2
ACT II(Next day at noon, in the Library of the Ibsen club. Aspacious room, with glass doors right and left. At theback, in the middle, is the fireplace, surmounted by ahandsome mantelpiece, with a bust of Ibsen, anddecorated inscriptions of the titles of his plays.There are circular recesses at each side of fireplace,with divan seats running round them, and windows at thetop, the space between the divan and the window sillsbeing lined with books. A long settee is placed beforethe fire. Along the back of the settee, and touchingit, is a green table, littered with journals. Arevolving bookcase stands in the... Plays - Post by : tonyscott - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Bernard Shaw - Read : 3003

The Philanderer - Act 1 The Philanderer - Act 1

The Philanderer - Act 1
ACT I(A lady and gentleman are making love to one another inthe drawing-room of a flat in Ashly Gardens in theVictoria district of London. It is past ten at night.The walls are hung with theatrical engravings andphotographs--Kemble as Hamlet, Mrs. Siddons as QueenKatharine pleading in court, Macready as Werner (afterMaclise), Sir Henry Irving as Richard III (after Long),Miss Ellen Terry, Mrs. Kendal, Miss Ada Rehan, MadameSarah Bernhardt, Mr. Henry Arthur Jones, Mr. A. W.Pinero, Mr. Sydney Grundy, and so on, but not theSignora Duse or anyone connected with Ibsen. The roomis not a perfect square, the right hand corner at theback... Plays - Post by : tonyscott - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Bernard Shaw - Read : 2613

The Perfect Wagnerite - Bayreuth The Perfect Wagnerite - Bayreuth

The Perfect Wagnerite - Bayreuth
When the Bayreuth Festival Playhouse was at last completed, and opened in 1876 with the first performance of The Ring, European society was compelled to admit that Wagner was "a success." Royal personages, detesting his music, sat out the performances in the row of boxes set apart for princes. They all complimented him on the astonishing "push" with which, in the teeth of all obstacles, he had turned a fabulous and visionary project into a concrete commercial reality, patronized by the public at a pound a head. It is as well to know that these congratulations had no other effect upon... Nonfictions - Post by : tonyscott - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Bernard Shaw - Read : 2405

The Perfect Wagnerite - The Music Of The Future The Perfect Wagnerite - The Music Of The Future

The Perfect Wagnerite - The Music Of The Future
The success of Wagner has been so prodigious that to his dazzled disciples it seems that the age of what he called "absolute" music must be at an end, and the musical future destined to be an exclusively Wagnerian one inaugurated at Bayreuth. All great geniuses produce this illusion. Wagner did not begin a movement: he consummated it. He was the summit of the nineteenth century school of dramatic music in the same sense as Mozart was the summit (the word is Gounod's) of the eighteenth century school. And those who attempt to carry on his Bayreuth tradition will assuredly share... Nonfictions - Post by : tonyscott - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Bernard Shaw - Read : 1753