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What's-his-name - Chapter 6. The Revolver What's-his-name - Chapter 6. The Revolver

What's-his-name - Chapter 6. The Revolver
CHAPTER VI. THE REVOLVERHe waited until the middle of the week for some sign from her; none coming, he decided to go once more to her apartment before it was too late. The many letters he wrote to her during the first days after learning of her change of plans were never sent. He destroyed them. A sense of shame, a certain element of pride, held them back. Still, he argued with no little degree of justice, there were many things to be decided before she took the long journey--and the short step she was so plainly contemplating. It was no... Long Stories - Post by : ?ric_Hamel - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Barr Mccutcheon - Read : 1033

What's-his-name - Chapter 5. Christmas What's-his-name - Chapter 5. Christmas

What's-his-name - Chapter 5. Christmas
CHAPTER V. CHRISTMASThe weeks went slowly by and Christmas came to the little house in Tarrytown. He had become resigned but not reconciled to Nellie's continued and rather persistent absence, regarding it as the sinister proclamation of her intention to carry out the plan for separation in spite of all that he could do to avert the catastrophe. His devotion to Phoebe was more intense than ever; it had reached the stage of being pathetic. True to his word, he wrote to Mr. Davis, who in time responded, saying that he could give him a place at the soda fountain in... Long Stories - Post by : ?ric_Hamel - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Barr Mccutcheon - Read : 1257

What's-his-name - Chapter 4. Luncheon What's-his-name - Chapter 4. Luncheon

What's-his-name - Chapter 4. Luncheon
CHAPTER IV. LUNCHEONFor several days, he moped about the house, not even venturing upon the porch, his face a sight to behold. His spirits were lower than they had been in all his life. The unmerciful beating he had sustained at the hands of Fairfax was not the sole cause of his depression. As the consequences of that pummelling subsided, the conditions which led up to it forced themselves upon him with such horrifying immensity that he fairly staggered under them. It slowly dawned on him that there was something very sinister in Fairfax's visit, something terrible. Nellie's protracted stay in... Long Stories - Post by : ?ric_Hamel - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Barr Mccutcheon - Read : 724

What's-his-name - Chapter 3. Mr. Fairfax What's-his-name - Chapter 3. Mr. Fairfax

What's-his-name - Chapter 3. Mr. Fairfax
CHAPTER III. MR. FAIRFAXHe found the nursemaid up and waiting for him. Phoebe had a "dreadful throat" and a high temperature. It had come on very suddenly, it seems, and if Annie's memory served her right it was just the way diphtheria began. The little girl had been thrashing about in the bed and whimpering for "daddy" since eight o'clock. His heart sank like lead, to a far deeper level than it had dropped with the base desertion of Butler. Filled with remorse, he ran upstairs without taking off his hat or overcoat. The feeling of resentment toward Butler was lost... Long Stories - Post by : ?ric_Hamel - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Barr Mccutcheon - Read : 994

What's-his-name - Chapter 2. Miss Nellie Duluth What's-his-name - Chapter 2. Miss Nellie Duluth

What's-his-name - Chapter 2. Miss Nellie Duluth
CHAPTER II. MISS NELLIE DULUTHNellie Duluth had an apartment up near the Park, the upper end of the Park, in fact, and to the east of it. She went up there, she said, so that she could be as near as possible to her husband and daughter. Besides, she hated taking the train at the Grand Central on Sundays. She always went to One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Street in her electric brougham. It didn't seem so far to Tarrytown from One Hundred and Twenty-fifth. In making her calculations Nellie always went through the process of subtracting forty-two from one-twenty-five, seldom correctly.... Long Stories - Post by : ?ric_Hamel - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Barr Mccutcheon - Read : 3434

What's-his-name - Chapter 1. Our Hero What's-his-name - Chapter 1. Our Hero

What's-his-name - Chapter 1. Our Hero
CHAPTER I. OUR HEROTwo men were standing in front of the Empire Theatre on Broadway, at the outer edge of the sidewalk, amiably discussing themselves in the first person singular. It was late in September and somewhat early in the day for actors to be abroad, a circumstance which invites speculation. Attention to their conversation, which was marked by the habitual humility, would have convinced the listener (who is always welcome) that both had enjoyed a successful season on the road, although closing somewhat prematurely on account of miserable booking, and that both had received splendid "notices" in every town visited.... Long Stories - Post by : ?ric_Hamel - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Barr Mccutcheon - Read : 3151

West Wind Drift - Book 3 - Chapter 4 West Wind Drift - Book 3 - Chapter 4

West Wind Drift - Book 3 - Chapter 4
BOOK III CHAPTER IVIn the cool of a balmy January evening, following what had been the hottest day the castaways had experienced since coming to Trigger Island, a group of men and women sat upon the Governor's porch. There was no moon, but the sky was speckled with millions of stars. Olga Obosky, sitting on the squared log that served as a step, leaned back against the awning post, her legs stretched out in luxurious abandon. She was fanning herself, and her breath came rapidly, pantingly. Now and then she patted her moist face with a handkerchief. "How warm you are,... Long Stories - Post by : ?ric_Hamel - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Barr Mccutcheon - Read : 3381

West Wind Drift - Book 3 - Chapter 3 West Wind Drift - Book 3 - Chapter 3

West Wind Drift - Book 3 - Chapter 3
BOOK III CHAPTER IIIIt was Olga Obosky who discovered and exposed the plot. A young Spaniard had fallen hopelessly, madly in love with her. He was a good-looking, hard-eyed boy from the pampas,--a herder who was on his way to visit his mother in from Rio. He was a "gun-slinger" bearing close relationship to the type of cowboy that existed in the old days of the Far West but who is now extinct save for pictorial perpetuation on the moving-picture screens. Down in his wild young heart smouldered a furious jealousy of Percival. Crust played upon this jealousy to fine effect.... Long Stories - Post by : ?ric_Hamel - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Barr Mccutcheon - Read : 1691

West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 14 West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 14

West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 14
BOOK II CHAPTER XIVA fortnight later, Ruth and Percival were married. He was now governor of Trigger Island. The ceremony took place at noon on the Green in front of the Government Building,--(an imposing name added to the already extensive list by which the "meeting-house" was known),--and was attended by the whole population of the island. His desire for a simple wedding had been vigorously, almost violently opposed by the people. Led by Randolph Fitts and the eloquent Malone, they demanded the pomp and ceremony of a state wedding. As governor of Trigger Island, they clamoured, it was his duty to... Long Stories - Post by : cshawl - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Barr Mccutcheon - Read : 1965

West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 13 West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 13

West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 13
BOOK II CHAPTER XIIIAs he swung jauntily down the road in the direction of his "office," all the world might have seen that it was a beautiful place for him. He passed children hurrying to school, and shouted envious "hurry-ups" to them. Men and women, going about the morning's business, felt better for the cheery greetings he gave them. Even Manuel Crust, pushing a crude barrow laden with fire-wood, paused to look after the strutting figure, resuming his progress with an annoyed scowl on his brow, for he had been guilty of a pleasant response to Percival's genial "good-morning." Manuel went... Long Stories - Post by : cshawl - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Barr Mccutcheon - Read : 1674

West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 12 West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 12

West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 12
BOOK II CHAPTER XIISailors, sniffing the gale that night, shook their heads and said there was snow on the tail of it. Morning found the ground mottled with splashes of white and a fine, frost-like sleet blowing fitfully across the plain. The ridge of trees over against the shore became vague and shapeless beneath the filmy veil, while the sea out beyond the breakers was clothed in a grey shroud, bleak and impenetrable. Knapendyke was positive and reassuring in his contention that no great amount of snow ever fell upon the island. While much of the vegetation was of a character... Long Stories - Post by : cshawl - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Barr Mccutcheon - Read : 974

West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 11 West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 11

West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 11
BOOK II CHAPTER XIShay, coming up the walk, distinctly heard what he said. "What's the matter, Bill?" he inquired, pausing. "Did she throw the hooks into you?" Landover glared at him balefully. "You go to hell, damn you," he snarled, and walked away. "Soapy" rubbed his chin dubiously as he watched the retreating figure. Pursing his thin lips, he turned his attention to an unoffending stump six or eight feet away and scowled at it vindictively. He was turning something over in his mind, and he was manifestly in a state of indecision. Ruminating, he spoke aloud, perhaps for the benefit... Long Stories - Post by : cshawl - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Barr Mccutcheon - Read : 2862

West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 10 West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 10

West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 10
BOOK II CHAPTER XToward the close of the exercises, the congregation was startled by the sound of an ax smiting wood. The blows were rapid and vigorous. The surprised people looked at each other first in wonder and then in consternation. Who was guilty of this unseemly sacrilege? Finally those on the edge of the multitude discovered the wielder of the ax. Some one, not easily recognizable, was chopping away the supports of the scaffold. The crowd grew restless; angry mutterings were to be heard on all sides. Every eye was turned from the platform to glare at the lone chopper... Long Stories - Post by : cshawl - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Barr Mccutcheon - Read : 2400

West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 9 West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 9

West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 9
BOOK II CHAPTER IXJust before sunset that evening, Sancho Mendez was publicly hanged. Confessing the crime, he was carried to the rude gibbet at the far edge of the wheat field and paid the price in full. He had been tried by a jury of twelve; and there was absolutely no question as to his guilt. His companion, a lad named Dominic, callously betrayed by the older man, fled to the forest and it was not until the second day after the hanging that he was found by a party of man-hunters, half-starved and half-demented. He was hanged at sunrise on... Long Stories - Post by : rankwarforum - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Barr Mccutcheon - Read : 2139

West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 8 West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 8

West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 8
BOOK II CHAPTER VIIIPercival's blood was still in a tumult as he ran down the line of cabins. From every doorway men were now stumbling, half-dressed, half-asleep. Behind them, in many cabins, alarmed, agitated women appeared. Farther on there were lanterns and a chaotic mass of moving objects. Above the increasing clamour rose the horrible, uncanny wail of a woman. Percival's blood cooled, his brain cleared. Men shouted questions as he passed, and obeyed his command to follow. The ugly story is soon told. Philippa, the fifteen-year-old daughter of Pedro, the head-farmer, had gone out from her father's cabin at dusk... Long Stories - Post by : rankwarforum - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Barr Mccutcheon - Read : 3291

West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 7 West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 7

West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 7
BOOK II CHAPTER VIIShe quickly closed the door behind her and sped off down the line of now lightless cabins. A man stepped out of the black shadow beyond the second cabin and stood in her path. She did not pause, but walked swiftly, fearlessly up to him, her heart quickening under the thrill of exultation. He was waiting for her! He had been waiting for her all the long evening. The time had come! The night was dark now; a strong wind had sprung up to drive the black and storm-laden clouds across the moonlit sky. She held out her... Long Stories - Post by : rankwarforum - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Barr Mccutcheon - Read : 1853

West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 4 West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 4

West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 4
BOOK II CHAPTER IVThe death of Betty Cruise occurred the second day after her baby was born. In a way, this lamentable occurrence solved a knotty problem and pacified two warring sexes, so to speak. For, be it known, the women of the Doraine took a most determined stand against the manner in which the men, viva voce, had arrogated unto themselves the right to name the baby. Not that any one of the women objected to the name they had given her; they were, in fact, pleased with it. But, they protested, this was a matter over which but one... Long Stories - Post by : rankwarforum - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Barr Mccutcheon - Read : 3429

West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 3 West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 3

West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 3
BOOK II CHAPTER IIIDuring the days and weeks that followed, Percival maintained an attitude of rigid but courteous aloofness. Only on occasions when it was necessary to consult with Ruth and her aunt on matters pertaining to the "order of the day" did he relax in the slightest degree from the position he had taken in regard to them. In time, the captious Mrs. Spofford began to resent this studied indifference. She detested him more than ever for not running true to the form she had predicted; her apprehensiveness gave way to irritation. She resented his dignified, pleasant "good mornings"; she... Long Stories - Post by : rankwarforum - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Barr Mccutcheon - Read : 856

West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 2 West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 2

West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 2
BOOK II CHAPTER IIThe first of the two boats came alongside, and men began to go clumsily, even fearfully down the ladders. Throughout the early stages of activity on shore, the passengers and crew went out in shifts, so to speak. Percival and others experienced in construction work had learned that efficiency and accomplishment depend entirely upon the concentration of force, and so, instead of piling hundreds of futile men on shore to create confusion, they adopted the plan of sending out daily detachments of fifty or sixty, to work in regular rotation until all available man power had been broken... Long Stories - Post by : rankwarforum - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Barr Mccutcheon - Read : 2154

West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 1 West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 1

West Wind Drift - Book 2 - Chapter 1
BOOK II CHAPTER IThe warm, summer season was well-advanced in this far southern land before the strenuous, tireless efforts of the marooned settlers began to show definite results. Some six weeks after the stranding of the Doraine, staunch log cabins were in course of completion along the base of the hills overlooking the clear, rolling meadow-land to the north and east. Down in the lowlands scores of men were employed in sowing and planting. The soil was rich. Farmers and grain-raisers among the passengers were unanimously of the opinion that almost any vegetable, cereal or fruit indigenous to Argentina (or at... Long Stories - Post by : rankwarforum - Date : May 2012 - Author : George Barr Mccutcheon - Read : 1139