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Dame Prudence On Riches Dame Prudence On Riches

Dame Prudence On Riches
When Prudence had heard her husband avaunt himself of his riches and of his money, dispreising the power of his adversaries, she spake and said in this wise: Certes, dear sir, I grant you that ye ben rich and mighty, and that riches ben good to 'em that han well ygetten 'em, and that well can usen 'em; for, right as the body of a man may not liven withouten soul, no more may it liven withouten temporal goods, and by riches may a man get him great friends; and therefore saith Pamphilus: If a neatherd's daughter be rich, she may... Essays - Post by : scalezz - Date : October 2011 - Author : Geoffrey Chaucer - Read : 1071

Troilus And Cressida - BOOK 5 Troilus And Cressida - BOOK 5

Troilus And Cressida - BOOK 5
THE FIFTH BOOK.APPROACHE gan the fatal destinyThat Jovis hath in disposition,And to you angry Parcae,* Sisters three, *The FatesCommitteth to do execution;For which Cressida must out of the town,And Troilus shall dwelle forth in pine,* *painTill Lachesis his thread no longer twine.* *twistThe golden-tressed Phoebus, high aloft,Thries* had alle, with his beames clear, *thriceThe snowes molt,* and Zephyrus as oft *meltedY-brought again the tender leaves green,Since that *the son of Hecuba the queen* *Troilus *Began to love her first, for whom his sorrowWas all, that she depart should on the morrow In the morning, Diomede was ready to escort Cressida to... Poems - Post by : inason - Date : June 2011 - Author : Geoffrey Chaucer - Read : 1405

Troilus And Cressida - BOOK 4 Troilus And Cressida - BOOK 4

Troilus And Cressida - BOOK 4
THE FOURTH BOOKA BRIEF Proem to the Fourth Book prepares us for the treachery of Fortune to Troilus; from whom she turned away her bright face, and took of him no heed, "and cast him clean out of his lady's grace, and on her wheel she set up Diomede." Then the narrative describes a skirmish in which the Trojans were worsted, and Antenor, with many of less note, remained in the hands of the Greeks. A truce was proclaimed for the exchange of prisoners; and as soon as Calchas heard the news, he came to the assembly of the Greeks, to... Poems - Post by : zerolocity - Date : June 2011 - Author : Geoffrey Chaucer - Read : 776

Troilus And Cressida - BOOK 3 Troilus And Cressida - BOOK 3

Troilus And Cressida - BOOK 3
THE THIRD BOOK.To the Third Book is prefixed a beautiful invocation of Venus, under the character of light: O Blissful light, of which the beames clearAdornen all the thirde heaven fair!O Sunne's love, O Jove's daughter dear!Pleasance of love, O goodly debonair,* *lovely and gracious*In gentle heart ay* ready to repair!** *always **enter and abideO very* cause of heal** and of gladness, *true **welfareY-heried* be thy might and thy goodness! *praisedIn heav'n and hell, in earth and salte sea.Is felt thy might, if that I well discern;As man, bird, beast, fish, herb, and greene tree,They feel in... Poems - Post by : ccagent - Date : June 2011 - Author : Geoffrey Chaucer - Read : 710

Troilus And Cressida - BOOK 2 Troilus And Cressida - BOOK 2

Troilus And Cressida - BOOK 2
THE SECOND BOOK.IN the Proem to the Second Book, the poet hails the clear weather that enables him to sail out of those black waves in which his boat so laboured that he could scarcely steer -- that is, "the tempestuous matter of despair, that Troilus was in; but now of hope the kalendes begin." He invokes the aid of Clio; excuses himself to every lover for what may be found amiss in a book which he only translates; and, obviating any lover's objection to the way in which Troilus obtained his lady's grace - - through Pandarus' mediation -- says... Poems - Post by : darlene88 - Date : June 2011 - Author : Geoffrey Chaucer - Read : 2357

Troilus And Cressida - BOOK 1 Troilus And Cressida - BOOK 1

Troilus And Cressida - BOOK 1
THE FIRST BOOK.(In several respects, the story of "Troilus and Cressida" may be regarded as Chaucer's noblest poem. Larger in scale than any other of his individual works -- numbering nearly half as many lines as The Canterbury Tales contain, without reckoning the two in prose -- the conception of the poem is yet so closely and harmoniously worked out, that all the parts are perfectly balanced, and from first to last scarcely a single line is superfluous or misplaced. The finish and beauty of the poem as a work of art, are not more conspicuous than the knowledge of human... Poems - Post by : bluegirl - Date : June 2011 - Author : Geoffrey Chaucer - Read : 3509

The Canterbury Tales: General Prologue The Canterbury Tales: General Prologue

The Canterbury Tales: General Prologue
THE PROLOGUE. WHEN that Aprilis, with his showers swoot*, *sweetThe drought of March hath pierced to the root,And bathed every vein in such licour,Of which virtue engender'd is the flower;When Zephyrus eke with his swoote breathInspired hath in every holt* and heath *grove, forestThe tender croppes* and the younge sun... Poems - Post by : winningteam1 - Date : February 2011 - Author : Geoffrey Chaucer - Read : 3090

The Canterbury Tales: The Knight's Tale The Canterbury Tales: The Knight's Tale

The Canterbury Tales: The Knight's Tale
TALE WHILOM*, as olde stories tellen us, *formerlyThere was a duke that highte* Theseus. *was called Of Athens he was lord and governor,And in his time such a conquerorThat greater was there none under the sun.Full many a riche country had he won.What with his wisdom and his chivalry,He conquer'd all the regne of Feminie,That whilom was y-cleped Scythia;And... Poems - Post by : Dan_Schulz - Date : February 2011 - Author : Geoffrey Chaucer - Read : 3298

The Canterbury Tales: The Miller's Tale The Canterbury Tales: The Miller's Tale

The Canterbury Tales: The Miller's Tale
THE PROLOGUE When that the Knight had thus his tale toldIn all the rout was neither young nor old,That he not said it was a noble story,And worthy to be *drawen to memory*; *recorded*And *namely the gentles* every one. *especially the gentlefolk*Our Host then laugh'd and swore, "So may I gon,* *prosperThis goes aright; *unbuckled is the... Poems - Post by : foggs - Date : February 2011 - Author : Geoffrey Chaucer - Read : 2625

The Canterbury Tales: The Reeve's Tale The Canterbury Tales: The Reeve's Tale

The Canterbury Tales: The Reeve's Tale
THE PROLOGUE WHEN folk had laughed all at this nice caseOf Absolon and Hendy Nicholas,Diverse folk diversely they said,But for the more part they laugh'd and play'd;* *were divertedAnd at this tale I saw no man him grieve,But it were only Osewold the Reeve.Because he was of carpenteres craft,A little ire is in his hearte laft*; *leftHe gan to grudge* and blamed it a... Poems - Post by : wm-graham - Date : February 2011 - Author : Geoffrey Chaucer - Read : 953

The Canterbury Tales: The Cook's Tale The Canterbury Tales: The Cook's Tale

The Canterbury Tales: The Cook's Tale
THE PROLOGUE THE Cook of London, while the Reeve thus spake,For joy he laugh'd and clapp'd him on the back:"Aha!" quoth he, "for Christes passion,This Miller had a sharp conclusion,Upon this argument of herbergage.* *lodgingWell saide Solomon in his language,Bring thou not every man into thine house,For harbouring by night is perilous.*Well ought a man avised for to be* *a man should take good heed*Whom that he brought into... Poems - Post by : adamb - Date : February 2011 - Author : Geoffrey Chaucer - Read : 2594

The Canterbury Tales: The Man Of Law's Tale The Canterbury Tales: The Man Of Law's Tale

The Canterbury Tales: The Man Of Law's Tale
THE PROLOGUE. Our Hoste saw well that the brighte sunTh' arc of his artificial day had runThe fourthe part, and half an houre more;And, though he were not deep expert in lore,He wist it was the eight-and-twenty dayOf April, that is messenger to May;And saw well that the shadow of every treeWas in its length of the same quantityThat was the body erect that caused it;And therefore by the shadow he took his wit*, *knowledgeThat Phoebus, which that shone so clear and bright,Degrees was five-and-forty clomb... Poems - Post by : sonata01 - Date : February 2011 - Author : Geoffrey Chaucer - Read : 3374

The Canterbury Tales: The Wife Of Bath's Tale The Canterbury Tales: The Wife Of Bath's Tale

The Canterbury Tales: The Wife Of Bath's Tale
THE PROLOGUE Experience, though none authority* *authoritative textsWere in this world, is right enough for meTo speak of woe that is in marriage:For, lordings, since I twelve year was of age,(Thanked be God that *is etern on live),* *lives eternally*Husbands at the church door have I had five,For I so often have y-wedded be,And all were worthy men in their degree.But me was told, not longe time gone isThat sithen* Christe went never but ones... Poems - Post by : wescoast - Date : February 2011 - Author : Geoffrey Chaucer - Read : 1727

The Canterbury Tales: The Friar's Tale The Canterbury Tales: The Friar's Tale

The Canterbury Tales: The Friar's Tale
THE PROLOGUE This worthy limitour, this noble Frere,He made always a manner louring cheer* *countenanceUpon the Sompnour; but for honesty* *courtesyNo villain word as yet to him spake he:But at the last he said unto the Wife:"Dame," quoth he, "God give you right good life,Ye have here touched, all so may I the,*... Poems - Post by : Steve_Enlow - Date : February 2011 - Author : Geoffrey Chaucer - Read : 3638

The Canterbury Tales: The Sompnour's Tale The Canterbury Tales: The Sompnour's Tale

The Canterbury Tales: The Sompnour's Tale
THE PROLOGUE. The Sompnour in his stirrups high he stood,Upon this Friar his hearte was so wood,* *furiousThat like an aspen leaf he quoke* for ire: *quaked, trembled"Lordings," quoth he, "but one thing I desire;I you beseech, that of your courtesy,Since ye have heard this false Friar lie,As suffer me I may my tale tellThis Friar boasteth that he knoweth hell,And, God it wot, that is but little... Poems - Post by : frankbck - Date : February 2011 - Author : Geoffrey Chaucer - Read : 2250

The Canterbury Tales: The Clerk's Tale The Canterbury Tales: The Clerk's Tale

The Canterbury Tales: The Clerk's Tale
THE PROLOGUE "SIR Clerk of Oxenford," our Hoste said,"Ye ride as still and coy, as doth a maidThat were new spoused, sitting at the board:This day I heard not of your tongue a word.I trow ye study about some sophime:* *sophismBut Solomon saith, every thing hath time.For Godde's sake, be of *better cheer,* *livelier mien*It is no time for to... Poems - Post by : David_C_H - Date : February 2011 - Author : Geoffrey Chaucer - Read : 1186

The Canterbury Tales: The Merchant's Tale The Canterbury Tales: The Merchant's Tale

The Canterbury Tales: The Merchant's Tale
THE PROLOGUE "Weeping and wailing, care and other sorrow,I have enough, on even and on morrow,"Quoth the Merchant, "and so have other mo',That wedded be; I trow* that it be so; *believeFor well I wot it fareth so by me.I have a wife, the worste that may be,For though the fiend to her y-coupled were,She would him overmatch, I dare well swear.Why should I you rehearse in specialHer high malice? she is *a shrew at all.*... Poems - Post by : rankwarforum - Date : February 2011 - Author : Geoffrey Chaucer - Read : 3681

The Canterbury Tales: The Squire's Tale The Canterbury Tales: The Squire's Tale

The Canterbury Tales: The Squire's Tale
THE PROLOGUE. "HEY! Godde's mercy!" said our Hoste tho,* *then"Now such a wife I pray God keep me fro'.Lo, suche sleightes and subtilitiesIn women be; for aye as busy as beesAre they us silly men for to deceive,And from the soothe* will they ever weive,** *truth **swerve, departAs this Merchante's tale it proveth well.But natheless, as true as any steel,I have a wife, though that she poore be;But of her tongue a labbing* shrew is she;... Poems - Post by : Bill_Shor - Date : February 2011 - Author : Geoffrey Chaucer - Read : 3203

The Canterbury Tales: The Franklin's Tale The Canterbury Tales: The Franklin's Tale

The Canterbury Tales: The Franklin's Tale
THE PROLOGUE "IN faith, Squier, thou hast thee well acquit,And gentilly; I praise well thy wit,"Quoth the Franklin; "considering thy youtheSo feelingly thou speak'st, Sir, I aloue* thee, *allow, approve*As to my doom,* there is none that is here *so far as my judgmentOf eloquence that shall be thy peer, goes*If that thou live; God give thee goode chance,And in... Poems - Post by : Jeff_Walker - Date : February 2011 - Author : Geoffrey Chaucer - Read : 1240

The Canterbury Tales: The Doctor's Tale The Canterbury Tales: The Doctor's Tale

The Canterbury Tales: The Doctor's Tale
THE PROLOGUE The Canterbury Tales("YEA, let that passe," quoth our Host, "as now.Sir Doctor of Physik, I praye you,Tell us a tale of some honest mattere.""It shall be done, if that ye will it hear,"Said this Doctor; and his tale gan anon."Now, good men," quoth he, "hearken everyone.")  Notes to the Prologue to the Doctor's Tale 1. The authenticity of the prologue is questionable. It is found in one manuscript only; other manuscripts give other prologues, more plainly not Chaucer's than this; and some manuscripts have merely a colophon to the effect that "Here endeth the Franklin's Tale... Poems - Post by : websm - Date : February 2011 - Author : Geoffrey Chaucer - Read : 4204