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The Jolly Juggler The Jolly Juggler

The Jolly Juggler
The Text is from a manuscript at Balliol College, Oxford, No. 354, already referred to in the First Series (p. 80) as supplying a text of The Nut-brown Maid. The manuscript, which is of the early part of the sixteenth century, has been edited by Ewald Fluegel in Anglia, vol. xxvi. the present ballad appears on pp. 278-9. I have only modernised the spelling, and broken up the lines, as the ballad is written in two long lines and a short one to each stanza. No other text is known to me. The volume of Anglia containing the ballad was... Poems - Post by : cyberlife - Date : September 2011 - Author : Frank Sidgwick - Read : 2327

The Lord Maxwell's Last Goodnight The Lord Maxwell's Last Goodnight

The Lord Maxwell's Last Goodnight
The Text is from the Glenriddell MSS., and is the one on which Sir Walter Scott based the version given in the Border Minstrelsy. Byron notes in the preface to Childe Harold that 'the good-night in the beginning of the first canto was suggested by Lord Maxwell's Goodnight in the Border Minstrelsy.' The Story.--John, ninth Lord Maxwell, killed Sir James Johnstone in 1608; the feud between the families was of long standing (see 3.4), beginning in 1585. Lord Maxwell fled the country, and was sentenced to death in his absence. On his return in 1612 he was betrayed by a kinsman,... Poems - Post by : kennylove - Date : September 2011 - Author : Frank Sidgwick - Read : 1629

The Whummil Bore The Whummil Bore

The Whummil Bore
The Text is from Motherwell's MS. He included it in the Appendix to his Minstrelsy. No other collector or editor notices the ballad--'if it ever were one,' as Child remarks. The only point to be noted is that the second stanza has crept into two versions of Hind Horn, apparently because of the resemblance of the previous stanzas, which present a mere ballad-commonplace. THE WHUMMIL BORE 1. Seven lang years I hae served the king, Fa fa fa fa lilly And I never got a sight of his daughter but ane.... Poems - Post by : biztycoon - Date : September 2011 - Author : Frank Sidgwick - Read : 988

The Laird Of Knottington The Laird Of Knottington

The Laird Of Knottington
The Text was sent to Percy in 1768 by R. Lambe of Norham. The ballad is widely known in Scotland under several titles, but the most usual is The Broom of Cowdenknows, which was the title used by Scott in the Minstrelsy. The Story is not consistently told in this version, as in 11.3,4 the daughter gives away her secret to her father in an absurd fashion. An English song, printed as a broadside about 1640, The Lovely Northerne Lasse, is directed to be sung 'to a pleasant Scotch tune, called The broom of Cowden Knowes.' It is a poor variant... Poems - Post by : plusprofits - Date : September 2011 - Author : Frank Sidgwick - Read : 614

The Battle Of Harlaw The Battle Of Harlaw

The Battle Of Harlaw
The Text of this ballad was sent to Professor Child by Mr. C. E. Dalrymple of Kinaldie, Aberdeenshire, from whose version the printed variants (Notes and Queries, Third Series, vii. 393, and Aytoun's Ballads of Scotland, i. 75) have been more or less directly derived. The ballad is one of those mentioned in The Complaynt of Scotland (1549), like the 'Hunttis of Chevet' (see p. 2 of this volume). It is again mentioned as being in print in 1668; but the latter may possibly refer to a poem on the battle, afterwards printed in Allan Ramsay's Evergreen. The fact that the... Poems - Post by : guru4retirement - Date : September 2011 - Author : Frank Sidgwick - Read : 1206

Durham Field Durham Field

Durham Field
The Text is another of the lively battle-pieces from the Percy Folio, put into modern spelling, and no other version is known or needed. The battle of Durham, which the minstrel says (27.1, 64.2) was fought on a morning of May, and (64.3,4) within a month of Crecy and Poictiers,(1) actually took place on October 17, 1346. Stanza 18 makes the king say to Lord Hamilton that they are of 'kin full nigh'; and this provides an upper limit for the date of the ballad, as James Hamilton was married to Princess Mary, sister of James III., in 1474. (Footnote 1:... Poems - Post by : 42583 - Date : September 2011 - Author : Frank Sidgwick - Read : 1530

Earl Bothwell Earl Bothwell

Earl Bothwell
The Text is from the Percy Folio, the spelling being modernised. Percy printed it (with alterations) in the Reliques. The Story of the ballad represents that Darnley was murdered by way of revenge for his participation in the murder of Riccio; that Mary sent for Darnley to come to Scotland, and that she was finally banished by the Regent. All of these statements, and several minor ones, contain as much truth as may be expected in a ballad of this kind. Mary escaped from Lochleven Castle on May 2, 1568, and found refuge in England on the 16th. The ballad was... Poems - Post by : Jerry - Date : September 2011 - Author : Frank Sidgwick - Read : 3379

The Heir Of Linne The Heir Of Linne

The Heir Of Linne
The Text is taken from the Percy Folio, but I have modernised the spelling. For the Reliques Percy made a ballad out of the Folio version combined with 'a modern ballad on a similar subject,' a broadside entitled The Drunkard's Legacy, thus producing a very good result which is about thrice the length of the Folio version. The Scottish variant was noted by Motherwell and Buchan, but previous editors--Herd, Ritson, Chambers, Aytoun--had used Percy's composition. The Story.--There are several Oriental stories which resemble the ballad as compounded by Percy from The Drunkard's Legacy. In most of these--Tartar, Turkish, Arabic, Persian, etc.--the... Poems - Post by : filmmaker - Date : September 2011 - Author : Frank Sidgwick - Read : 1406

Jamie Douglas And Waly, Waly, Gin Love Be Bonny Jamie Douglas And Waly, Waly, Gin Love Be Bonny

Jamie Douglas And Waly, Waly, Gin Love Be Bonny
The Text of the ballad is here given from Kinloch's MSS. it is in the handwriting of John Hill Burton when a youth. The text of the song Waly, waly, I take from Ramsay's Tea-Table Miscellany. The song and the ballad have become inextricably confused, and the many variants of the former contain a greater or a smaller proportion of verses apparently taken from the latter. The Story of the ballad as here told is nevertheless quite simple and straightforward. It is spoken in the first person by the daughter of the Earl of Mar. (She also says she is... Poems - Post by : riviera - Date : September 2011 - Author : Frank Sidgwick - Read : 1972

John O' The Side John O' The Side

John O' The Side
'He is weil kend, Johne of the Syde, A greater theif did never ryde.' Sir Richard Maitland. The Text is from the Percy Folio, but is given in modernised spelling. It lacks the beginning, probably, and one line in st. 3, which can be easily guessed; but as a whole it is an infinitely fresher and better ballad than that inserted in the Minstrelsy of Sir Walter Scott. The Story is akin to that of Kinmont Willie (p. 49). John of the Side (on the river Liddel, nearly opposite Mangerton) first appears about 1550 in... Poems - Post by : fraggle - Date : September 2011 - Author : Frank Sidgwick - Read : 780

Katharine Jaffray Katharine Jaffray

Katharine Jaffray
The Text is from Herd's MSS., two copies showing a difference of one word and a few spellings. Stt. 3 and 5 are interchanged for the sake of the sense. Many copies of this ballad exist (Child prints a dozen), but this one is both the shortest and simplest. The Story.--In The Cruel Brother (First Series, p. 76) it was shown that a lover must 'speak to the brother' of his lady. Here the lesson, it seems, is that he must 'tell the lass herself' before her wedding-day. Katharine, however, not only proves her faith to her first lover (her 'grass-green'... Poems - Post by : wizkid - Date : September 2011 - Author : Frank Sidgwick - Read : 1868

Clyde's Water Clyde's Water

Clyde's Water
The Text is from the Skene MS., but I have omitted the three final lines, which do not make a complete stanza, and, when compared with Scott's 'Old Lady's' version, are obviously corrupt. The last verse should signify that the mothers of Willie and Meggie went up and down the bank saying, 'Clyde's water has done us wrong!' The ballad is better known as Willie and May Margaret. The Story.--Willie refuses his mother's request to stay at home, as he wishes to visit his true-love. The mother puts her malison, or curse, upon him, but he rides off. Clyde is roaring,... Poems - Post by : nelis - Date : September 2011 - Author : Frank Sidgwick - Read : 1375

Sir James The Rose Sir James The Rose

Sir James The Rose
+The Text+ is from Motherwell's Minstrelsy (1827). It is based on a stall-copy, presumably similar to one preserved by Sir Walter Scott at Abbotsford, combined with a version from recitation, which Child none the less calls 'well remembered from print.' +The Story+ has no historical foundation, as far as can be discovered; and for once we have a traditional tale inculcating a moral, though we do not understand why the 'nourice' betrays Sir James to his enemies. Michael Bruce wrote a version of the story of this ballad, which seems to have become more popular than the ballad itself. It may... Poems - Post by : walmergreen - Date : September 2011 - Author : Frank Sidgwick - Read : 2555

Bessy Bell And Mary Gray Bessy Bell And Mary Gray

Bessy Bell And Mary Gray
The Text is from Sharpe's Ballad Book. A parody of this ballad, concerning an episode of the end of the seventeenth century, shows it to have been popular not long after its making. In England it has become a nursery rhyme (see Halliwell's Nursery Rhymes, p. 246). The Story.--In 1781 a Major Barry, then owner of Lednock, recorded the following tradition. Mary Gray was the daughter of the Laird of Lednock, near Perth, and Bessy Bell was the daughter of the Laird of Kinvaid, a neighbouring place. Both were handsome, and the two were intimate friends. Bessy Bell being come on... Poems - Post by : Matt_Maiden - Date : September 2011 - Author : Frank Sidgwick - Read : 1881

The Gipsy Laddie The Gipsy Laddie

The Gipsy Laddie
+The Text+ is from Motherwell's MS., a copy from tradition in Renfrewshire in 1825. The ballad exists both in English and Scottish, and though the English ballad is probably derived from the Scottish, it was the first in print. It is also called Johnnie Faa. Motherwell, in printing an elaborated version of the following text (Minstrelsy, 1827, p. 360), called it Gypsie Davy. +The Story.+--Singers--presumably gipsies--entice Lady Cassillis down to hear them, and cast glamour on her. She follows their chief, Gipsy Davy, but finds (stt. 5 and 6) that the conditions are changed. Her lord misses her, seeks her 'thro'... Poems - Post by : carolinatraders - Date : September 2011 - Author : Frank Sidgwick - Read : 661

The Baron Of Brackley The Baron Of Brackley

The Baron Of Brackley
The Text is from Alexander Laing's Scarce Ancient Ballads (1822). A similar version occurs in Buchan's Gleanings (1825). Professor Gummere, in printing the first text, omits six stanzas, on the assumption that they represent part of a second ballad imperfectly incorporated. But I think the ballad can be read as it stands below, though doubtless 'his ladie's' remark, st. 11, is out of place. +The Story+ seems to be a combination of at least two. An old Baron of Brackley, 'an honest aged man,' was slain in 1592 by 'caterans' or freebooters who had been entertained hospitably by him. In 1666... Poems - Post by : Pam_Sharp - Date : September 2011 - Author : Frank Sidgwick - Read : 3601

Geordie Geordie

Geordie
The Text is from Johnson's Museum, communicated by Robert Burns. The Story.--Some editors have identified the hero of the ballad with George Gordon, fourth earl of Huntly, but upon what grounds it is difficult to see. There are two English broadside ballads, of the first and second halves respectively of the seventeenth century, which are either the originals of, or copies from, the Scottish ballad, which exists in many variants. The earlier is concerned with 'the death of a worthy gentleman named George Stoole,' 'to a delicate Scottish tune,' and the second is called 'The Life and Death of George of... Poems - Post by : primesca - Date : September 2011 - Author : Frank Sidgwick - Read : 857

The Fire Of Frendraught The Fire Of Frendraught

The Fire Of Frendraught
The Text is from Motherwell's Minstrelsy. He received the ballad from Charles Kirkpatrick Sharp. In Maidment's North Countrie Garland there is a similar version with a number of small verbal differences. The Story.--Frendraught in Aberdeenshire, and Rothiemay in Banffshire, lie on opposite sides of the Deveron, which separates the counties. A feud began (as the result of a dispute over fishing rights) between Crichton of Frendraught and Gordon of Rothiemay, and in a fight on the first day of the year 1630, Rothiemay and others were killed. Kinsmen of both parties were involved; and though the broil was temporarily settled, another... Poems - Post by : Julie_Kerr - Date : September 2011 - Author : Frank Sidgwick - Read : 2255

Bewick And Grahame Bewick And Grahame

Bewick And Grahame
The Text is from several broadsides and chap-books, but mainly depends on a stall-copy entitled The Song of Bewick and Grahame, approximately dated 1740. Sir Walter Scott considered this ballad 'remarkable, as containing probably the very latest allusion to the institution of brotherhood in arms' (see 14.4, and the use of the word 'bully'); but Child strongly suspects there was an older and better copy than those extant, none of which is earlier than the eighteenth century. +The Story+ is concerned with two fathers, who boast about their sons, and cause the two lads to fight. Christy Graham is faced with... Poems - Post by : iLeKtraN - Date : September 2011 - Author : Frank Sidgwick - Read : 1940

The Death Of Parcy Reed The Death Of Parcy Reed

The Death Of Parcy Reed
The Text.--There are two texts available for this ballad, of which the second one, here given, was said to have been taken down from the singing of an old woman by James Telfer of Liddesdale, and was so printed in Richardson's Borderers' Table Book (1846). It preserves almost the whole of the other version, taken from Robert White's papers, who recorded it in 1829; but it obviously bears marks of having been tampered with by Telfer. However, it contains certain stanzas which Child says may be regarded as traditional, and it is therefore preferred here. The Story.--Percival or Parcy Reed was... Poems - Post by : 2workathome2 - Date : September 2011 - Author : Frank Sidgwick - Read : 2926