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The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 23 The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 23

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 23
Book 2 Chapter XXIII(1) Civil knowledge is conversant about a subject which of all others is most immersed in matter, and hardliest reduced to axiom. Nevertheless, as Cato the Censor said, "That the Romans were like sheep, for that a man were better drive a flock of them, than one of them; for in a flock, if you could get but some few go right, the rest would follow:" so in that respect moral philosophy is more difficile than policy. Again, moral philosophy propoundeth to itself the framing of internal goodness; but civil knowledge requireth only an external goodness;... Nonfictions - Post by : bulkmailer007 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Francis Bacon - Read : 3022

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 22 The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 22

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 22
Book 2 Chapter XXII(1) Now, therefore, that we have spoken of this fruit of life, it remaineth to speak of the husbandry that belongeth thereunto, without which part the former seemeth to be no better than a fair image or statue, which is beautiful to contemplate, but is without life and motion; whereunto Aristotle himself subscribeth in these words: Necesse est scilicet de virtute dicere, et quid sit, et ex quibus gignatur. Inutile enum fere fuerit virtutem quidem nosse, acquirendae autem ejus modos et vias ignorare. Non enum de virtute tantum, qua specie sit, quaerendum est, sed et... Nonfictions - Post by : bulkmailer007 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Francis Bacon - Read : 694

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 21 The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 21

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 21
Book 2 Chapter XXI(1) To resume private or particular good, it falleth into the division of good active and passive; for this difference of good (not unlike to that which amongst the Romans was expressed in the familiar or household terms of promus and condus) is formed also in all things, and is best disclosed in the two several appetites in creatures; the one to preserve or continue themselves, and the other to dilate or multiply themselves of the latter seemeth to be the worthier; for in nature the heavens, which are the more worthy, are the agent, and the earth,... Nonfictions - Post by : bulkmailer007 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Francis Bacon - Read : 2711

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 20 The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 20

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 20
Book 2 Chapter XX(1) We proceed now to that knowledge which considereth of the appetite and will of man: whereof Solomon saith, Ante omnia, fili, custodi cor tuum: nam inde procedunt actiones vitae. In the handling of this science, those which have written seem to me to have done as if a man, that professed to teach to write, did only exhibit fair copies of alphabets and letters joined, without giving any precepts or directions for the carriage of the hand and framing of the letters. So have they made good and fair exemplars and copies, carrying... Nonfictions - Post by : bulkmailer007 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Francis Bacon - Read : 1284

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 19 The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 19

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 19
Book 2 Chapter XIX(1) There remain two appendices touching the tradition of knowledge, the one critical, the other pedantical. For all knowledge is either delivered by teachers, or attained by men's proper endeavours: and therefore as the principal part of tradition of knowledge concerneth chiefly writing of books, so the relative part thereof concerneth reading of books; whereunto appertain incidently these considerations. The first is concerning the true correction and edition of authors; wherein nevertheless rash diligence hath done great prejudice. For these critics have often presumed that that which they understand not is false set down:... Nonfictions - Post by : bulkmailer007 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Francis Bacon - Read : 2735

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 18 The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 18

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 18
Book 2 Chapter XVIII(1) Now we descend to that part which concerneth the illustration of tradition, comprehended in that science which we call rhetoric, or art of eloquence, a science excellent, and excellently well laboured. For although in true value it is inferior to wisdom (as it is said by God to Moses, when he disabled himself for want of this faculty, "Aaron shall be thy speaker, and thou shalt be to him as God"), yet with people it is the more mighty; for so Solomon saith, Sapiens corde appellabitur prudens, sed dulcis eloquio majora reperiet, signifying that profoundness of... Nonfictions - Post by : bulkmailer007 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Francis Bacon - Read : 1581

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 17 The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 17

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 17
Book 2 Chapter XVII(1) For the method of tradition, I see it hath moved a controversy in our time. But as in civil business, if there be a meeting, and men fall at words, there is commonly an end of the matter for that time, and no proceeding at all; so in learning there is much controversy, there is many times little inquiry. For this part of knowledge of method seemeth to me so weakly inquired as I shall report it deficient. (2) Method hath been placed, and that not amiss, in logic, as a part of judgment.... Nonfictions - Post by : bulkmailer007 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Francis Bacon - Read : 1460

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 13 The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 13

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 13
Book 2 Chapter XIII(1) Invention is of two kinds much differing--the one of arts and sciences, and the other of speech and arguments. The former of these I do report deficient; which seemeth to me to be such a deficience as if, in the making of an inventory touching the state of a defunct, it should be set down that there is no ready money. For as money will fetch all other commodities, so this knowledge is that which should purchase all the rest. And like as the West Indies had never been discovered if the use of the... Nonfictions - Post by : bulkmailer007 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Francis Bacon - Read : 2626

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 12 The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 12

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 12
Book 2 Chapter XII(1) The knowledge which respecteth the faculties of the mind of man is of two kinds--the one respecting his understanding and reason, and the other his will, appetite, and affection; whereof the former produceth position or decree, the latter action or execution. It is true that the imagination is an agent or nuncius in both provinces, both the judicial and the ministerial. For sense sendeth over to imagination before reason have judged, and reason sendeth over to imagination before the decree can be acted. For imagination ever precedeth voluntary motion. Saving that this Janus of... Nonfictions - Post by : bulkmailer007 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Francis Bacon - Read : 3237

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 11 The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 11

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 11
Book 2 Chapter XI(1) For human knowledge which concerns the mind, it hath two parts; the one that inquireth of the substance or nature of the soul or mind, the other that inquireth of the faculties or functions thereof. Unto the first of these, the considerations of the original of the soul, whether it be native or adventive, and how far it is exempted from laws of matter, and of the immortality thereof, and many other points, do appertain: which have been not more laboriously inquired than variously reported; so as the travail therein taken seemeth to have... Nonfictions - Post by : bulkmailer007 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Francis Bacon - Read : 858

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 10 The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 10

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 10
Book 2 Chapter X(1) The knowledge that concerneth man's body is divided as the good of man's body is divided, unto which it referreth. The good of man's body is of four kinds--health, beauty, strength, and pleasure: so the knowledges are medicine, or art of cure; art of decoration, which is called cosmetic; art of activity, which is called athletic; and art voluptuary, which Tacitus truly calleth eruditus luxus. This subject of man's body is, of all other things in nature, most susceptible of remedy; but then that remedy is most susceptible of error; for the same subtlety of the... Nonfictions - Post by : bulkmailer007 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Francis Bacon - Read : 2144

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 9 The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 9

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 9
Book 2 Chapter IX(1) We come therefore now to that knowledge whereunto the ancient oracle directeth us, which is the knowledge of ourselves; which deserveth the more accurate handling, by how much it toucheth us more nearly. This knowledge, as it is the end and term of natural philosophy in the intention of man, so notwithstanding it is but a portion of natural philosophy in the continent of Nature. And generally let this be a rule, that all partitions of knowledges be accepted rather for lines and veins than for sections and separations; and that the continuance and entireness... Nonfictions - Post by : Claire - Date : May 2012 - Author : Francis Bacon - Read : 2163

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 8 The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 8

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 8
Book 2 Chapter VIII(1) Nevertheless, there remaineth yet another part of natural philosophy, which is commonly made a principal part, and holdeth rank with physic special and metaphysic, which is mathematic; but I think it more agreeable to the nature of things, and to the light of order, to place it as a branch of metaphysic. For the subject of it being quantity, not quantity indefinite, which is but a relative, and belongeth to philosophia prima (as hath been said), but quantity determined or proportionable, it appeareth to be one of the essential forms of things, as that that is... Nonfictions - Post by : Claire - Date : May 2012 - Author : Francis Bacon - Read : 3073

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 7 The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 7

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 7
Book 2 Chapter VII(1) Leaving therefore divine philosophy or natural theology (not divinity or inspired theology, which we reserve for the last of all as the haven and sabbath of all man's contemplations) we will now proceed to natural philosophy. If then it be true that Democritus said, "That the truth of nature lieth hid in certain deep mines and caves;" and if it be true likewise that the alchemists do so much inculcate, that Vulcan is a second nature, and imitateth that dexterously and compendiously, which nature worketh by ambages and length of time, it were good to divide... Nonfictions - Post by : Claire - Date : May 2012 - Author : Francis Bacon - Read : 3043

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 3 The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 3

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 3
Book 2 Chapter III(1) History ecclesiastical receiveth the same divisions with history civil: but further in the propriety thereof may be divided into the history of the Church, by a general name; history of prophecy; and history of providence. The first describeth the times of the militant Church, whether it be fluctuant, as the ark of Noah, or movable, as the ark in the wilderness, or at rest, as the ark in the Temple: that is, the state of the Church in persecution, in remove, and in peace. This part I ought in no sort to note... Nonfictions - Post by : Claire - Date : May 2012 - Author : Francis Bacon - Read : 2501

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 2 The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 2

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 2
Book 2 Chapter II(1) For civil history, it is of three kinds; not unfitly to be compared with the three kinds of pictures or images. For of pictures or images we see some are unfinished, some are perfect, and some are defaced. So of histories we may find three kinds: memorials, perfect histories, and antiquities; for memorials are history unfinished, or the first or rough drafts of history; and antiquities are history defaced, or some remnants of history which have casually escaped the shipwreck of time. (2) Memorials, or preparatory history, are of two sorts; whereof the one may... Nonfictions - Post by : Claire - Date : May 2012 - Author : Francis Bacon - Read : 2968

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 1 The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 1

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - Chapter 1
Book 2 Chapter I(1) The parts of human learning have reference to the three parts of man's understanding, which is the seat of learning: history to his memory, poesy to his imagination, and philosophy to his reason. Divine learning receiveth the same distribution; for, the spirit of man is the same, though the revelation of oracle and sense be diverse. So as theology consisteth also of history of the Church; of parables, which is divine poesy; and of holy doctrine or precept. For as for that part which seemeth supernumerary, which is prophecy, it is but divine history, which... Nonfictions - Post by : Claire - Date : May 2012 - Author : Francis Bacon - Read : 1033

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - The Second Book The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - The Second Book

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 2 - The Second Book
THE SECOND BOOK. To the King.1. It might seem to have more convenience, though it come often otherwise to pass (excellent King), that those which are fruitful in their generations, and have in themselves the foresight of immortality in their descendants, should likewise be more careful of the good estate of future times, unto which they know they must transmit and commend over their dearest pledges. Queen Elizabeth was a sojourner in the world in respect of her unmarried life, and was a blessing to her own times; and yet so as the impression of her good government, besides... Nonfictions - Post by : Claire - Date : May 2012 - Author : Francis Bacon - Read : 1719

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 1 - Chapter 8 The Advancement Of Learning - Book 1 - Chapter 8

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 1 - Chapter 8
Book 1 Chapter VIII(1) To proceed now from imperial and military virtue to moral and private virtue; first, it is an assured truth, which is contained in the verses:- "Scilicet ingenuas didicisse fideliter artesEmollit mores nec sinit esse feros."It taketh away the wildness and barbarism and fierceness of men's minds; but indeed the accent had need be upon fideliter; for a little superficial learning doth rather work a contrary effect. It taketh away all levity, temerity, and insolency, by copious suggestion of all doubts and difficulties, and acquainting the mind to balance reasons on both sides, and to... Nonfictions - Post by : Claire - Date : May 2012 - Author : Francis Bacon - Read : 1158

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 1 - Chapter 7 The Advancement Of Learning - Book 1 - Chapter 7

The Advancement Of Learning - Book 1 - Chapter 7
Book 1 Chapter VII(1) As for human proofs, it is so large a field, as in a discourse of this nature and brevity it is fit rather to use choice of those things which we shall produce, than to embrace the variety of them. First, therefore, in the degrees of human honour amongst the heathen, it was the highest to obtain to a veneration and adoration as a God. This unto the Christians is as the forbidden fruit. But we speak now separately of human testimony, according to which--that which the Grecians call apotheosis, and the Latins relatio... Nonfictions - Post by : Claire - Date : May 2012 - Author : Francis Bacon - Read : 1003