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Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXXIV Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXXIV

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXXIV
FOR some days after that evening Mr. Heathcliff shunned meeting usat meals; yet he would not consent formally to exclude Hareton andCathy. He had an aversion to yielding so completely to hisfeelings, choosing rather to absent himself; and eating once intwenty-four hours seemed sufficient sustenance for him.One night, after the family were in bed, I heard him go downstairs,and out at the front door. I did not hear him re-enter, and in themorning I found he was still away. We were in April then: theweather was sweet and warm, the grass as green as showers and suncould... Long Stories - Post by : Newhomebusiness - Date : January 2011 - Author : Emily Bronte - Read : 746

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXXIII Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXXIII

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXXIII
ON the morrow of that Monday, Earnshaw being still unable to followhis ordinary employments, and therefore remaining about the house,I speedily found it would be impracticable to retain my chargebeside me, as heretofore. She got downstairs before me, and outinto the garden she had seen her cousin performing some easywork; and when I went to bid them come to breakfast, I saw she hadpersuaded him to clear a large space of ground from currant andgooseberry bushes, and they were busy planning together animportation of plants from the Grange.I was terrified at the devastation which had been accomplished in abrief... Long Stories - Post by : DrRich - Date : January 2011 - Author : Emily Bronte - Read : 3116

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXXII Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXXII

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXXII
1802. - This September I was invited to devastate the moors of afriend in the north, and on my journey to his abode, I unexpectedlycame within fifteen miles of Gimmerton. The ostler at a roadsidepublic-house was holding a pail of water to refresh my horses, whena cart of very green oats, newly reaped, passed by, and heremarked, - 'Yon's frough Gimmerton, nah! They're allas threewick' after other folk wi' ther harvest.''Gimmerton?' I repeated - my residence in that locality had alreadygrown dim and dreamy. 'Ah! I know. How far is it from this?''Happen fourteen mile o'er... Long Stories - Post by : rcgroup - Date : January 2011 - Author : Emily Bronte - Read : 782

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXXI Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXXI

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXXI
YESTERDAY was bright, calm, and frosty. I went to the Heights as Iproposed: my housekeeper entreated me to bear a little note fromher to her young lady, and I did not refuse, for the worthy womanwas not conscious of anything odd in her request. The front doorstood open, but the jealous gate was fastened, as at my last visit;I knocked and invoked Earnshaw from among the garden-beds; heunchained it, and I entered. The fellow is as handsome a rustic asneed be seen. I took particular notice of him this time; but thenhe does his best apparently... Long Stories - Post by : KennyMc - Date : January 2011 - Author : Emily Bronte - Read : 2496

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXX Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXX

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXX
I HAVE paid a visit to the Heights, but I have not seen her sinceshe left: Joseph held the door in his hand when I called to askafter her, and wouldn't let me pass. He said Mrs. Linton was'thrang,' and the master was not in. Zillah has told me somethingof the way they go on, otherwise I should hardly know who was deadand who living. She thinks Catherine haughty, and does not likeher, I can guess by her talk. My young lady asked some aid of herwhen she first came; but Mr. Heathcliff told her to... Long Stories - Post by : valu39 - Date : January 2011 - Author : Emily Bronte - Read : 807

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXIX Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXIX

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXIX
THE evening after the funeral, my young lady and I were seated inthe library; now musing mournfully - one of us despairingly - onour loss, now venturing conjectures as to the gloomy future.We had just agreed the best destiny which could await Catherinewould be a permission to continue resident at the Grange; at leastduring Linton's life: he being allowed to join her there, and I toremain as housekeeper. That seemed rather too favourable anarrangement to be hoped for; and yet I did hope, and began to cheerup under the prospect of retaining my home and my employment, and,above all,... Long Stories - Post by : majorian - Date : January 2011 - Author : Emily Bronte - Read : 954

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXVIII Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXVIII

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXVIII
ON the fifth morning, or rather afternoon, a different stepapproached - lighter and shorter; and, this time, the personentered the room. It was Zillah; donned in her scarlet shawl, witha black silk bonnet on her head, and a willow-basket swung to herarm.'Eh, dear! Mrs. Dean!' she exclaimed. 'Well! there is a talkabout you at Gimmerton. I never thought but you were sunk in theBlackhorse marsh, and missy with you, till master told me you'dbeen found, and he'd lodged you here! What! and you must have goton an island, sure? And how long were you in... Long Stories - Post by : billgluth - Date : January 2011 - Author : Emily Bronte - Read : 2108

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXVII Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXVII

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXVII
SEVEN days glided away, every one marking its course by thehenceforth rapid alteration of Edgar Linton's state. The havocthat months had previously wrought was now emulated by the inroadsof hours. Catherine we would fain have deluded yet; but her ownquick spirit refused to delude her: it divined in secret, andbrooded on the dreadful probability, gradually ripening intocertainty. She had not the heart to mention her ride, whenThursday came round; I mentioned it for her, and obtainedpermission to order her out of doors: for the library herfather stopped a short time daily - the brief period... Long Stories - Post by : getyours - Date : January 2011 - Author : Emily Bronte - Read : 2264

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXVI Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXVI

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXVI
SUMMER was already past its prime, when Edgar reluctantly yieldedhis assent to their entreaties, and Catherine and I set out on ourfirst ride to join her cousin. It was a close, sultry day: devoidof sunshine, but with a sky too dappled and hazy to threaten rain:and our place of meeting had been fixed at the guide-stone, by thecross-roads. On arriving there, however, a little herd-boy,despatched as a messenger, told us that, - 'Maister Linton wer justo' this side th' Heights: and he'd be mitch obleeged to us to gangon a bit further.''Then Master Linton has forgot the... Long Stories - Post by : fbyrne - Date : January 2011 - Author : Emily Bronte - Read : 3419

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXV Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXV

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXV
'THESE things happened last winter, sir,' said Mrs. Dean; 'hardlymore than a year ago. Last winter, I did not think, at anothertwelve months' end, I should be amusing a stranger to the familywith relating them! Yet, who knows how long you'll be a stranger?You're too young to rest always contented, living by yourself; andI some way fancy no one could see Catherine Linton and not loveher. You smile; but why do you look so lively and interested whenI talk about her? and why have you asked me to hang her pictureover your fireplace? and why - ?''Stop, my... Long Stories - Post by : rezaloans - Date : January 2011 - Author : Emily Bronte - Read : 1822

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXIV Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXIV

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXIV
AT the close of three weeks I was able to quit my chamber and moveabout the house. And on the first occasion of my sitting up in theevening I asked Catherine to read to me, because my eyes were weak.We were in the library, the master having gone to bed: sheconsented, rather unwillingly, I fancied; and imagining my sort ofbooks did not suit her, I bid her please herself in the choice ofwhat she perused. She selected one of her own favourites, and gotforward steadily about an hour; then came frequent questions.'Ellen, are not you tired? Hadn't... Long Stories - Post by : MrSonic - Date : January 2011 - Author : Emily Bronte - Read : 1638

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXIII Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXIII

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXIII
THE rainy night had ushered in a misty morning - half frost, halfdrizzle - and temporary brooks crossed our path - gurgling from theuplands. My feet were thoroughly wetted; I was cross and low;exactly the humour suited for making the most of these disagreeablethings. We entered the farm-house by the kitchen way, to ascertainwhether Mr. Heathcliff were really absent: because I put slightfaith in his own affirmation.Joseph seemed sitting in a sort of elysium alone, beside a roaringfire; a quart of ale on the table near him, bristling with largepieces of toasted oat-cake; and his black, short pipe... Long Stories - Post by : ntibbs - Date : January 2011 - Author : Emily Bronte - Read : 1657

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXII Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXII

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXII
SUMMER drew to an end, and early autumn: it was past Michaelmas,but the harvest was late that year, and a few of our fields werestill uncleared. Mr. Linton and his daughter would frequently walkout among the reapers; at the carrying of the last sheaves theystayed till dusk, and the evening happening to be chill and damp,my master caught a bad cold, that settled obstinately on his lungs,and confined him indoors throughout the whole of the winter, nearlywithout intermission.Poor Cathy, frightened from her little romance, had beenconsiderably sadder and duller since its abandonment; and herfather insisted on her reading less,... Long Stories - Post by : jello8 - Date : January 2011 - Author : Emily Bronte - Read : 1481

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXI Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXI

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XXI
WE had sad work with little Cathy that day: she rose in high glee,eager to join her cousin, and such passionate tears andlamentations followed the news of his departure that Edgar himselfwas obliged to soothe her, by affirming he should come back soon:he added, however, 'if I can get him'; and there were no hopes ofthat. This promise poorly pacified her; but time was more potent;and though still at intervals she inquired of her father whenLinton would return, before she did see him again his features hadwaxed so dim in her memory that she did not recognise him.When I... Long Stories - Post by : Paddy - Date : January 2011 - Author : Emily Bronte - Read : 3225

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XX Wuthering Heights - Chapter XX

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XX
TO obviate the danger of this threat being fulfilled, Mr. Lintoncommissioned me to take the boy home early, on Catherine's pony;and, said he - 'As we shall now have no influence over his destiny,good or bad, you must say nothing of where he is gone to mydaughter: she cannot associate with him hereafter, and it isbetter for her to remain in ignorance of his proximity; lest sheshould be restless, and anxious to visit the Heights. Merely tellher his father sent for him suddenly, and he has been obliged toleave us.'Linton was very reluctant to be roused from his bed... Long Stories - Post by : diveman - Date : January 2011 - Author : Emily Bronte - Read : 1569

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XIX Wuthering Heights - Chapter XIX

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XIX
A LETTER, edged with black, announced the day of my master'sreturn, Isabella was dead; and he wrote to bid me get mourning forhis daughter, and arrange a room, and other accommodations, for hisyouthful nephew. Catherine ran wild with joy at the idea ofwelcoming her father back; and indulged most sanguine anticipationsof the innumerable excellencies of her 'real' cousin. The eveningof their expected arrival came. Since early morning she had beenbusy ordering her own small affairs; and now attired in her newblack frock - poor thing! her aunt's death impressed her with nodefinite sorrow - she obliged me, by... Long Stories - Post by : Imagineer - Date : January 2011 - Author : Emily Bronte - Read : 1149

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XVIII Wuthering Heights - Chapter XVIII

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XVIII
THE twelve years, continued Mrs. Dean, following that dismal periodwere the happiest of my life: my greatest troubles in theirpassage rose from our little lady's trifling illnesses, which shehad to experience in common with all children, rich and poor. Forthe rest, after the first six months, she grew like a larch, andcould walk and talk too, in her own way, before the heath blossomeda second time over Mrs. Linton's dust. She was the most winningthing that ever brought sunshine into a desolate house: a realbeauty in face, with the Earnshaws' handsome dark eyes, but theLintons' fair skin... Long Stories - Post by : ecmagic - Date : January 2011 - Author : Emily Bronte - Read : 2130

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XVII Wuthering Heights - Chapter XVII

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XVII
THAT Friday made the last of our fine days for a month. In theevening the weather broke: the wind shifted from south to north-east, and brought rain first, and then sleet and snow. On themorrow one could hardly imagine that there had been three weeks ofsummer: the primroses and crocuses were hidden under wintrydrifts; the larks were silent, the young leaves of the early treessmitten and blackened. And dreary, and chill, and dismal, thatmorrow did creep over! My master kept his room; I took possessionof the lonely parlour, converting it into a nursery: and... Long Stories - Post by : Darshana - Date : January 2011 - Author : Emily Bronte - Read : 1697

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XVI Wuthering Heights - Chapter XVI

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XVI
ABOUT twelve o'clock that night was born the Catherine you saw atWuthering Heights: a puny, seven-months' child; and two hoursafter the mother died, having never recovered sufficientconsciousness to miss Heathcliff, or know Edgar. The latter'sdistraction at his bereavement is a subject too painful to be dwelton; its after-effects showed how deep the sorrow sunk. A greataddition, in my eyes, was his being left without an heir. Ibemoaned that, as I gazed on the feeble orphan; and I mentallyabused old Linton for (what was only natural partiality) thesecuring his estate to his own daughter, instead of his son's.... Long Stories - Post by : REDBONE - Date : January 2011 - Author : Emily Bronte - Read : 2400

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XV Wuthering Heights - Chapter XV

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XV
ANOTHER week over - and I am so many days nearer health, andspring! I have now heard all my neighbour's history, at differentsittings, as the housekeeper could spare time from more importantoccupations. I'll continue it in her own words, only a littlecondensed. She is, on the whole, a very fair narrator, and I don'tthink I could improve her style.In the evening, she said, the evening of my visit to the Heights, Iknew, as well as if I saw him, that Mr. Heathcliff was about theplace; and I shunned going out, because I still carried his letterin my pocket,... Long Stories - Post by : Roseman - Date : January 2011 - Author : Emily Bronte - Read : 1677