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The Agony Of The Victorian Age The Agony Of The Victorian Age

The Agony Of The Victorian Age
For a considerable time past everybody must have noticed, especially in private conversation, a growing tendency to disparagement and even ridicule of all men and things, and aspects of things, which can be defined as "Victorian." Faded habits of mind are lightly dismissed as typical of the Victorian Age, and old favourite poets, painters, and musicians are treated with the same scorn as the glued chairs and glass bowls of wax flowers of sixty years ago. The new generation are hardly willing to distinguish what was good from what was bad in the time of their grandmothers. With increasing audacity they... Essays - Post by : davetropeano - Date : November 2011 - Author : Edmund Gosse - Read : 933

Some Soldier Poets Some Soldier Poets

Some Soldier Poets
The two years which preceded the outbreak of the war were marked in this country by a revival of public interest in the art of poetry. To this movement coherence was given and organisation introduced by Mr. Edward Marsh's now-famous volume entitled Georgian Poetry. The effect of this collection--for it is hardly correct to call it an anthology--of the best poems written by the youngest poets since 1911 was two-fold; it acquainted readers with work few had "the leisure or the zeal to investigate," and it brought the writers themselves together in a corporate and selected relation. I do not recollect... Essays - Post by : Roger_Mayne - Date : November 2011 - Author : Edmund Gosse - Read : 2837

The Lyrical Poetry Of Thomas Hardy The Lyrical Poetry Of Thomas Hardy

The Lyrical Poetry Of Thomas Hardy
When, about Christmas time in 1898, Mr. Hardy's admirers, who were expecting from him a new novel, received instead a thick volume of verse, there was mingled with their sympathy and respect a little disappointment and a great failure in apprehension. Those who were not rude enough to suggest that a cobbler should stick to his last, reminded one another that many novelists had sought relaxation by trifling with the Muses. Thackeray had published Ballads, and George Eliot had expatiated in a Legend of Jubal. No one thought the worse of Coningsby because its author had produced a Revolutionary Epic. It... Essays - Post by : pkrnts - Date : November 2011 - Author : Edmund Gosse - Read : 3976

Three Experiments In Portraiture Three Experiments In Portraiture

Three Experiments In Portraiture
I LADY DOROTHY NEVILL AN OPEN LETTER Dear Lady Burghclere, When we met for the first time after the death of our friend, you desired me to produce what you were kind enough to call "one of my portraits." But the art of the portrait-writer is capricious, and at that time I felt wholly disinclined for the adventure. I excused myself on the ground that the three thick volumes of her reminiscences made a further portrait needless, and I reflected, though I did not say, that the difficulties of presenting the evanescent charm and petulant wit of... Essays - Post by : maris - Date : November 2011 - Author : Edmund Gosse - Read : 3195

The Novels Of Benjamin Disraeli The Novels Of Benjamin Disraeli

The Novels Of Benjamin Disraeli
It is not easy for a man whose sovereign ambition is seen to be leading him with great success in a particular direction to obtain due credit for what he accomplishes with less manifest success in another. There is no doubt that Disraeli as an author has, at all events until very lately, suffered from the splendour of his fame as a politician. But he was an author long before he became a statesman, and it certainly is a little curious that even in his youth, although he was always commercially successful with his books, they were never, as we say,... Essays - Post by : netpower - Date : November 2011 - Author : Edmund Gosse - Read : 2084

The Challenge Of The Brontes The Challenge Of The Brontes

The Challenge Of The Brontes
THE CHALLENGE OF THE BRONTËS(1) Although I possess in no degree the advantage which so many of the members of your society enjoy in being personally connected with the scenes and even, perhaps, with the characters associated with the Brontë family, I cannot begin my little address to you to-day without some invocation of the genius of the place. We meet at Dewsbury because the immortal sisters were identified with Dewsbury. Is it then not imperative that for whatever picture of them I may endeavour to present before you this afternoon, Dewsbury should form the background? Unfortunately, however, although in the... Essays - Post by : gsheiner - Date : November 2011 - Author : Edmund Gosse - Read : 1956

The Author Of 'pelham' The Author Of "pelham"

The Author Of 'pelham'
One hundred and twenty years have nearly passed since the birth of Bulwer-Lytton, and he continues to be suspended in a dim and ambiguous position in the history of our literature. He combined extraordinary qualities with fatal defects. He aimed at the highest eminence, and failed to reach it, but he was like an explorer, who is diverted from the main ascent of a mountain, and yet annexes an important table-land elsewhere. Bulwer-Lytton never secured the ungrudging praise of the best judges, but he attained great popularity, and has even now not wholly lost it. He is never quoted as one... Essays - Post by : mbumbarova - Date : November 2011 - Author : Edmund Gosse - Read : 1283

The Centenary Of Edgar Allan Poe The Centenary Of Edgar Allan Poe

The Centenary Of Edgar Allan Poe
In the announcements of the approaching celebration of the centenary of Poe in this country, the fact of his having been a poet was concealed. Perhaps his admirers hoped that it might be overlooked, as without importance, or condoned as the result of bad habits. At all events, the statement that the revels on that occasion would be conducted by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was quite enough to prove that it was the prose writer of "The Black Cat" and "The Murders in the Rue Morgue," and not the verso writer of "Ulalume" and "Annabel Lee" who would be the centre... Essays - Post by : Pauley - Date : November 2011 - Author : Edmund Gosse - Read : 2445

The Charm Of Sterne The Charm Of Sterne

The Charm Of Sterne
THE CHARM OF STERNE(1) It is exactly two hundred years to-night since there was born, at Clonmel, in Ireland, a son to a subaltern in an English regiment just home from the Low Countries. "My birthday," Laurence Sterne tells us, "was ominous to my poor father, who was, the day after our arrival, with many other brave officers, broke and sent adrift into the wide world with a wife and two children." The life of the new baby was one of perpetual hurry and scurry; his mother, who had been an old campaigner, daughter of what her son calls "a noted... Essays - Post by : visshop - Date : November 2011 - Author : Edmund Gosse - Read : 1633

Two Pioneers Of Romanticism: Joseph And Thomas Warton Two Pioneers Of Romanticism: Joseph And Thomas Warton

Two Pioneers Of Romanticism: Joseph And Thomas Warton
The origins of the Romantic Movement in literature have been examined so closely and so often that it might be supposed that the subject must be by this time exhausted. But no subject of any importance in literature is ever exhausted, because the products of literature grow or decay, burgeon or wither, as the generations of men apply their ever-varying organs of perception to them. I intend, with your permission, to present to you a familiar phase of the literary life of the eighteenth century from a fresh point of view, and in relation to two men whose surname warrants a... Essays - Post by : twain - Date : November 2011 - Author : Edmund Gosse - Read : 2817

Catharine Trotter, The Precursor Of The Bluestockings Catharine Trotter, The Precursor Of The Bluestockings

Catharine Trotter, The Precursor Of The Bluestockings
The practically complete absence of the Woman of Letters from our tropical and profuse literature of the early and middle seventeenth century has often been observed with wonder. While France had her Madeleine de Scudéry and her Mlle. de Gournay and her Mère Angelique Arnauld, Englishwomen of the Stuart age ventured upon no incursions into philosophy, fiction, or theology. More and more eagerly, however, they read books; and as a consequence of reading, they began at last to write. The precious Margaret, Duchess of Newcastle, hob-a-nobbed with every Muse in her amazing divagations. But the earliest professional woman of letters was... Essays - Post by : markfarrar - Date : November 2011 - Author : Edmund Gosse - Read : 1328

The Songs Of Shakespeare The Songs Of Shakespeare

The Songs Of Shakespeare
Among the "co-supremes and stars of love" which form the constellated glory of our greatest poet there is one small splendour which we are apt to overlook in our general survey. But, if we isolate it from other considerations, it is surely no small thing that Shakespeare created and introduced into our literature the Dramatic Song. If with statistical finger we turn the pages of all his plays, we shall discover, not perhaps without surprise, that these contain not fewer than fifty strains of lyrical measure. Some of the fifty, to be sure, are mere star-dust, but others include some of... Essays - Post by : degmentor - Date : November 2011 - Author : Edmund Gosse - Read : 3021

The Shepherd Of The Ocean The Shepherd Of The Ocean

The Shepherd Of The Ocean
THE SHEPHERD OF THE OCEAN(1) Three hundred years have gone by to-day since Sir Walter Raleigh was beheaded, in presence of a vast throng of spectators, on the scaffold of Old Palace Yard in Westminster. General Gordon said that England is what her adventurers have made her, and there is not in all English history a more shining and violent specimen of the adventurous type than Raleigh. I am desired to deliver a brief panegyric on this celebrated freebooter, and I go behind the modern definition of the word "panegyric" (as a pompous and ornamented piece of rhetoric) to its original... Essays - Post by : ksmason - Date : November 2011 - Author : Edmund Gosse - Read : 3500

The Future Of English Poetry The Future Of English Poetry

The Future Of English Poetry
The English Association Pamphlet No. 25 THE FUTURE OF ENGLISH POETRY by EDMUND GOSSE, C.B. June, 1913 THE FUTURE OF ENGLISH POETRY J'ai vu le cheval rose ouvrir ses ailes d'or, Et, flairant le laurier que je tenais encor, Verdoyant à jamais, hier comme aujourd'hui, Se cabrer vers le Jour et ruer vers la Nuit. HENRI DE RÉGNIER.In venturing this afternoon to address an audience accustomed to listen to those whose positive authority is universally recognized, and in taking for my theme a subject not, like theirs, distinct in its definitions or consecrated by tradition... Essays - Post by : allenr - Date : November 2011 - Author : Edmund Gosse - Read : 1191

The Shaving Of Shagpat The Shaving Of Shagpat

The Shaving Of Shagpat
THE SHAVING OF SHAGPAT. An Arabian Entertainment. By George Meredith. Chapman and Hall. 1856. It is nearly forty years since I first heard of The Shaving of Shagpat. I was newly come, in all my callow ardour, into the covenant of Art and Letters, and I was moving about, still bewildered, in a new world. In this new world, one afternoon, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, standing in front of his easel, remarked to all present whom it should concern, that The Shaving of Shagpat was a book which Shakespeare might have been glad to write. I now understand that in the warm... Essays - Post by : bigdr - Date : November 2011 - Author : Edmund Gosse - Read : 2256

Ionica Ionica

Ionica
IONICA. Smith Elder & Co., 65, Cornhill. 1858. Good poetry seems to be almost as indestructible as diamonds. You throw it out of the window into the roar of London, it disappears in a deep brown slush, the omnibus and the growler pass over it, and by and by it turns up again somewhere uninjured, with all the pure fire lambent in its facets. No doubt thoroughly good specimens of prose do get lost, dragged down the vortex of a change of fashion, and never thrown back again to light. But the quantity of excellent verse produced in any generation is... Essays - Post by : coinn13 - Date : November 2011 - Author : Edmund Gosse - Read : 2111

The Duke Of Rutland's Poems The Duke Of Rutland's Poems

The Duke Of Rutland's Poems
ENGLAND'S TRUST AND OTHER POEMS. By Lord John Manners. London: printed for J.G. & J. Rivington, St. Paul's Church Yard, and Waterloo Place, Pall Mall. 1841. My newspaper informed me this morning that Lord John Manners took his seat last night, in the Upper House, as the Duke of Rutland. These little romantic surprises are denied to Americans, who do not find that old friends get new names, which are very old names, in the course of a night. My Transatlantic readers will never have to grow accustomed to speak of Mr. Lowell as the Earl of Mount Auburn, and I... Essays - Post by : Jeremy_Daley - Date : November 2011 - Author : Edmund Gosse - Read : 1581

Ultra-crepidarius Ultra-crepidarius

Ultra-crepidarius
ULTRA-CREPIDARIUS; a Satire on William Gifford. By Leigh Hunt. London, 1823: printed for John Hunt, 22, Old Bond Street, and 38, Tavistock Street, Covent Garden. If the collector of first editions requires an instance from which to justify the faith which is in him against those who cry out that bibliography is naught, Leigh Hunt is a good example to his hand. This active and often admirable writer, during a busy professional life, issued a long series of works in prose and verse which are of every variety of commonness and scarcity, but which have never been, and probably never will... Essays - Post by : 61080 - Date : November 2011 - Author : Edmund Gosse - Read : 3289

The Fancy The Fancy

The Fancy
THE FANCY: A Selection from the Poetical Remains of the late Peter Corcoran, of Gray's Inn, student at law. With a brief Memoir of his life. London: printed for Taylor & Hessey, Fleet Street. 1820. The themes of the poets run in a very narrow channel. Since the old heroic times when the Homers and the Gunnlaugs sang of battle with the sleet of lances hurtling around them, a great calm has settled down upon Parnassus. Generation after generation pipes the same tune of love and Nature, of the liberal arts and the illiberal philosophies; the same imagery, the same metres,... Essays - Post by : landinfo - Date : November 2011 - Author : Edmund Gosse - Read : 3337

Peter Bell And His Tormentors Peter Bell And His Tormentors

Peter Bell And His Tormentors
PETER BELL: A Tale in Verse, by William Wordsworth. London: Printed by Strahan and Spottiswoode, Printers-Street: for Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme and Brown, Paternoster Row. 1819. None of Wordsworth's productions are better known by name than Peter Bell, and yet few, probably, are less familiar, even to convinced Wordsworthians. The poet's biographers and critics have commonly shirked the responsibility of discussing this poem, and when the Primrose stanza has been quoted, and the Parlour stanza smiled at, there is usually no more said about Peter Bell. A puzzling obscurity hangs around its history. We have no positive knowledge why its publication... Essays - Post by : goodthng - Date : November 2011 - Author : Edmund Gosse - Read : 1709