Full Online Books
BOOK CATEGORIES
Authors Authors Short Stories Short Stories Long Stories Long Stories Funny Stories Funny Stories Love Stories Love Stories Stories For Kids Stories For Kids Poems Poems Essays Essays Nonfictions Nonfictions Plays Plays Folktales Folktales Fairy Tales Fairy Tales Fables Fables Learning Kitchen Learning Kitchen
LINKS
Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional Free Classified Website Without Registration Free Classified Website Daniel Company
Twitter Twitter Add book
donate
Full Online Book HomeAuthor Charles LambPage 1
Famous Authors (View All Authors)

The Pawnbroker's Daughter, A Farce - Act 1 - Scene 2 The Pawnbroker's Daughter, A Farce - Act 1 - Scene 2

The Pawnbroker's Daughter, A Farce - Act 1 - Scene 2
ACT I - SCENE IISCENE II.--A Butcher's Shop.(CUTLET. BEN.)CUTLETReach me down that book off the shelf the shoulder of veal hangs.BENIs this it?CUTLETNo--this is "Flowers of Sentiment"--the other--aye, this is a good book. "An Argument against the Use of Animal Food. By J.R." _That means Joseph Ritson. I will open it anywhere, and read just as it happens. One cannot dip amiss in such books as these. The motto, I see, is from Pope. I dare say, very much to the purpose. (Reads.) "The lamb thy riot dooms to bleed to-day,... Plays - Post by : mindout - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 3288

The Pawnbroker's Daughter, A Farce - Act 1 - Scene 1 The Pawnbroker's Daughter, A Farce - Act 1 - Scene 1

The Pawnbroker's Daughter, A Farce - Act 1 - Scene 1
ACT I - SCENE ISCENE I.--An Apartment at Flint's house.(FLINT. WILLIAM.)FLINTCarry those umbrellas, cottons, and wearing-apparel, up stairs. You may send that chest of tools to Robins's.WILLIAMThat which you lent six pounds upon to the journeyman carpenter that had the sick wife?FLINTThe same.WILLIAMThe man says, if you can give him till Thursday--FLINTNot a minute longer. His time was out yesterday. These improvident fools!WILLIAMThe finical gentleman has been here about the seal that was his grandfather's.FLINTHe cannot have it. Truly, our trade would be brought to a fine pass, if we were bound to humour the fancies of our customers. This man... Plays - Post by : mindout - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 1594

John Woodvil; A Tragedy - Act 5 John Woodvil; A Tragedy - Act 5

John Woodvil; A Tragedy - Act 5
ACT V(JOHN WOODVIL)(_dressing_). JOHN How beautiful, (_handling his mourning_) And comely do these mourning garments shew! Sure Grief hath set his sacred impress here, To claim the world's respect! they note so feelingly By outward types the serious man within.-- Alas! what part or portion can I claim In all the decencies of virtuous sorrow, Which other mourners use? as namely, This black attire, abstraction from society,... Plays - Post by : ldjhns - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 2643

John Woodvil; A Tragedy - Act 2 John Woodvil; A Tragedy - Act 2

John Woodvil; A Tragedy - Act 2
ACT II(SCENE.--An Apartment in Woodvil Hall.)(John Woodvil--alone.)(_Reading Parts of a Letter._)"When Love grows cold, and indifference has usurped upon oldEsteem, it is no marvel if the world begin to account _that dependence, which hitherto has been esteemed honorable shelter. The course I have taken (in leaving this house, not easily wroughtthereunto,) seemed to me best for the once-for-all releasing ofyourself (who in times past have deserved well of me) from thenow daily, and not-to-be-endured, tribute of forced love,and ill-dissembled reluctance of affection. "MARGARET." Gone! gone! my girl? so hasty, Margaret!... Plays - Post by : atisa - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 3376

John Woodvil; A Tragedy - Act 1 John Woodvil; A Tragedy - Act 1

John Woodvil; A Tragedy - Act 1
ACT I(SCENE.--A Servants' Apartment in Woodvil Hall.) (Servants drinking--Time, the morning.) A Song by DANIEL"When the King enjoys his own again."PETERA delicate song. Where did'st learn it, fellow?DANIELEven there thou learnest thy oaths and thy politics--at our master's table.--Where else should a serving-man pick uphis poor accomplishments?MARTINWell spoken, Daniel. O rare Daniel!--his oaths and his politics!excellent!FRANCISAnd where did'st pick up thy knavery, Daniel?PETER That came to him by inheritance. His family have supplied the shire of Devon, time out of mind, with good thieves and bad... Plays - Post by : atisa - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 1499

John Woodvil; A Tragedy - Characters John Woodvil; A Tragedy - Characters

John Woodvil; A Tragedy - Characters
(1798-1802. Text of 1818) CHARACTERS SIR WALTER WOODVIL. JOHN. } SIMON. } his sons. LOVEL. } GRAY. } Pretended friends of John. SANDFORD. Sir Walter's old steward. MARGARET. Orphan ward of Sir Walter. FOUR GENTLEMEN. John's riotous companions. SERVANTS. SCENE--for the... Plays - Post by : mr.shih - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 2912

Mrs. Leicester's School - Chapter 10. Arabella Hardy Mrs. Leicester's School - Chapter 10. Arabella Hardy

Mrs. Leicester's School - Chapter 10. Arabella Hardy
CHAPTER X. ARABELLA HARDY(_By Charles Lamb_) I was born in the East Indies. I lost my father and mother young. At the age of five my relations thought it proper that I should be sent to England for my education. I was to be entrusted to the care of a young woman who had a character for great humanity and discretion; but just as I had taken leave of my friends, and we were about to take our passage, the young woman was taken suddenly ill, and could not go on board. In this unpleasant emergency, no one knew how to... Long Stories - Post by : qwerty - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 2321

Mrs. Leicester's School - Chapter 9. Susan Yates Mrs. Leicester's School - Chapter 9. Susan Yates

Mrs. Leicester's School - Chapter 9. Susan Yates
CHAPTER IX. SUSAN YATES(_By Charles Lamb_) I was born and brought up, in a house in which my parents had all their lives resided, which stood in the midst of that lonely tract of land called the Lincolnshire fens. Few families besides our own lived near the spot, both because it was reckoned an unwholesome air, and because its distance from any town or market made it an inconvenient situation. My father was in no very affluent circumstances, and it was a sad necessity which he was put to, of having to go many miles to fetch any thing he wanted... Long Stories - Post by : qwerty - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 848

Mrs. Leicester's School - Chapter 8. Charlotte Wilmot Mrs. Leicester's School - Chapter 8. Charlotte Wilmot

Mrs. Leicester's School - Chapter 8. Charlotte Wilmot
CHAPTER VIII. CHARLOTTE WILMOT(_By Mary Lamb_) Until I was eleven years of age, my life was one continued series of indulgence and delight. My father was a merchant, and supposed to be in very opulent circumstances, at least I thought so, for at a very early age I perceived that we lived in a more expensive way than any of my father's friends did. It was not the pride of birth, of which, miss Withers, you once imagined you might justly boast, but the mere display of wealth that I was early taught to set an undue value on. My parents... Long Stories - Post by : qwerty - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 1865

Mrs. Leicester's School - Chapter 5. Margaret Green Mrs. Leicester's School - Chapter 5. Margaret Green

Mrs. Leicester's School - Chapter 5. Margaret Green
CHAPTER V. MARGARET GREEN(_By Mary Lamb_) My father has been dead near three years. Soon after his death, my mother being left in reduced circumstances, she was induced to accept the offer of Mrs. Beresford, an elderly lady of large fortune, to live in her house as her companion, and the superintendent of her family. This lady was my godmother, and as I was my mother's only child, she very kindly permitted her to have me with her. Mrs. Beresford lived in a large old family mansion; she kept no company, and never moved except from the breakfast-parlour to the eating-room,... Long Stories - Post by : qwerty - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 800

Mrs. Leicester's School - Chapter 4. Elinor Forester Mrs. Leicester's School - Chapter 4. Elinor Forester

Mrs. Leicester's School - Chapter 4. Elinor Forester
CHAPTER IV. ELINOR FORESTER(_By Mary Lamb_) When I was very young, I had the misfortune to lose my mother. My father very soon married again. In the morning of the day in which that event took place, my father set me on his knee, and, as he often used to do after the death of my mother, he called me his dear little orphaned Elinor, and then he asked me if I loved miss Saville. I replied "Yes." Then he said this dear lady was going to be so kind as to be married to him, and that she was to... Long Stories - Post by : qwerty - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 1123

Mrs. Leicester's School - Chapter 3. Ann Withers Mrs. Leicester's School - Chapter 3. Ann Withers

Mrs. Leicester's School - Chapter 3. Ann Withers
CHAPTER III. ANN WITHERS(_By Mary Lamb_) My name you know is Withers, but as I once thought I was the daughter of sir Edward and lady Harriot Lesley, I shall speak of myself as miss Lesley, and call sir Edward and lady Harriot my father and mother during the period I supposed them entitled to those beloved names. When I was a little girl, it was the perpetual subject of my contemplation, that I was an heiress, and the daughter of a baronet; that my mother was the honourable lady Harriot; that we had a nobler mansion, infinitely finer pleasure-grounds, and... Long Stories - Post by : qwerty - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 3160

Mrs. Leicester's School - Chapter 2. Louisa Manners Mrs. Leicester's School - Chapter 2. Louisa Manners

Mrs. Leicester's School - Chapter 2. Louisa Manners
CHAPTER II. LOUISA MANNERS(_By Mary Lamb_) My name is Louisa Manners; I was seven years of age last birthday, which was on the first of May. I remember only four birthdays. The day I was four years old is the first that I recollect. On the morning of that day, as soon as I awoke, I crept into mamma's bed, and said, "Open your eyes, mamma, for it is my birthday. Open your eyes, and look at me!" Then mamma told me I should ride in a post chaise, and see my grandmamma and my sister Sarah. Grandmamma lived at a... Long Stories - Post by : qwerty - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 2227

Mrs. Leicester's School - Chapter 1. Elizabeth Villiers Mrs. Leicester's School - Chapter 1. Elizabeth Villiers

Mrs. Leicester's School - Chapter 1. Elizabeth Villiers
CHAPTER I. ELIZABETH VILLIERS(_By Mary Lamb_) My father is the curate of a village church, about five miles from Amwell. I was born in the parsonage-house, which joins the church-yard. The first thing I can remember was my father teaching me the alphabet from the letters on a tombstone that stood at the head of my mother's grave. I used to tap at my father's study-door; I think I now hear him say, "Who is there?--What do you want, little girl?" "Go and see mamma. Go and learn pretty letters." Many times in the day would my father lay aside his... Long Stories - Post by : qwerty - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 1980

Mrs. Leicester's School - Preface Mrs. Leicester's School - Preface

Mrs. Leicester's School - Preface
MRS. LEICESTER'S SCHOOL, OR, THE HISTORY OF SEVERAL YOUNG LADIES RELATED BY THEMSELVES (_Written 1808. 1st Edition 1809. Text of 2nd Edition 1809_) DEDICATION. TO THE YOUNG LADIES AT AMWELL SCHOOL  My dear young friends, Though released from the business of the school, the absence of your governess confines me to Amwell during the vacation. I cannot better employ my leisure hours than in contributing to the amusement of you my kind pupils, who, by your affectionate attentions to my instructions, have rendered a life of labour pleasant to me. On your return to school I hope to have a fair... Long Stories - Post by : ilmondo - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 3367

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 101 To Letter 107 The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 101 To Letter 107

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 101 To Letter 107
LETTER CI TO LETTER CVIILETTER CI. TO MR. GILLMAN. _November 30, 1829. Dear G.,--The excursionists reached home and the good town of Enfield a little after four, without slip or dislocation. Little has transpired concerning the events of the back-journey, save that on passing the house of 'Squire Mellish, situate a stone bow's cast from the hamlet, Father Westwood (1), with a good-natured wonderment, exclaimed, "I cannot think what is gone of Mr. Mellish's rooks. I fancy they have taken flight somewhere; but I have missed them two or three years past." All this while, according to his fellow-traveller's report, the... Nonfictions - Post by : Priscilla - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 1361

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 71 To Letter 80 The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 71 To Letter 80

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 71 To Letter 80
LETTER LXXI TO LETTER LXXXLETTER LXXI. TO WALTER WILSON. _December 16, 1822. Dear Wilson,--_Lightning I was going to call you. You must have thought me negligent in not answering your letter sooner. But I have a habit of never writing letters but at the office; 'tis so much time cribbed out of the Company; and I am but just got out of the thick of a tea-sale, in which most of the entry of notes, deposits, etc., usually falls to my share. I have nothing of De Foe's but two or three novels and the "Plague History." (1) I can... Nonfictions - Post by : Priscilla - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 1480

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 61 To Letter 70 The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 61 To Letter 70

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 61 To Letter 70
LETTER LXI TO LETTER LXXLETTER LXI. TO WORDSWORTH. _April 26, 1816. Dear W.,--I have just finished the pleasing task of correcting the revise of the poems and letter. (1) I hope they will come out faultless. One blunder I saw and shuddered at. The hallucinating rascal had printed _battered for _battened_, this last not conveying any distinct sense to his gaping soul. The Reader (as they call 'em) had discovered it, and given it the marginal brand; but the substitutory _n had not yet appeared. I accompanied his notice with a most pathetic address to the printer not to neglect the... Nonfictions - Post by : Priscilla - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 2861

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 51 To Letter 60 The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 51 To Letter 60

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 51 To Letter 60
LETTER LI TO LETTER LXLETTER LI. TO MISS WORDSWORTH. _August_, 1810. Mary has left a little space for me to fill up with nonsense, as the geographers used to cram monsters in the voids of the maps, and call it _Terra Incognita_. She has told you how she has taken to water like a hungry otter. I too limp after her in lame imitation, (1) but it goes against me a little at first. I have been acquaintance with it now for full four days, and it seems a moon. I am full of cramps and rheumatisms, and cold internally, so... Nonfictions - Post by : rayling - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 3373

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 41 To Letter 50 The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 41 To Letter 50

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 41 To Letter 50
LETTER XLI TO LETTER LLETTER XLI. TO MANNING. _February 19, 1803. My Dear Manning,--The general scope of your letter afforded no indications of insanity, but some particular points raised a scruple. For God's sake, don't think any more of "Independent Tartary." (1) What are you to do among such Ethiopians? Is there no _lineal descendant of Prester John? Is the chair empty? Is the sword unswayed? Depend upon it, they'll never make you their king as long as any branch of that great stock is remaining. I tremble for your Christianity. They will certainly circumcise you. Read Sir John Mandeville's travels... Nonfictions - Post by : ID3000 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 2599