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Muggahmaht'adem, The Dance Of Old Age, Or The Magic Of The Weewillmekq' Muggahmaht'adem, The Dance Of Old Age, Or The Magic Of The Weewillmekq'

Muggahmaht'adem, The Dance Of Old Age, Or The Magic Of The Weewillmekq'
Muggahmaht'adem, the Dance of Old Age, Or the Magic of the Weewillmekq' (Footnote: This mysterious being is called _Wee-wil-li-ah-mek_ in Penobscot The correct pronounciation is very nearly _Wee-wil-'l-mekqu'_ for both Penobscot and Passamaquoddy, but this would be a difficult utterence for any one who has never listened to the Algonquin soft gutturals. Mrs. W. Wallace Brown informs me that "the _Weewillmekqu'_ is a snail." This would account for its being thought to inhabit both land and water.) (Passamaquoddy.) Of old times. There lived in a village many Indians. Among them was a handsome young man, very brave, a great hunter. And... Short Stories - Post by : madblitzer - Date : July 2011 - Author : Charles G. Leland - Read : 3460

How A Woman Lost A Gun For Fear Of The Weewillmekq How A Woman Lost A Gun For Fear Of The Weewillmekq

How A Woman Lost A Gun For Fear Of The Weewillmekq
There was a man and his wife who had got together all they had for the fall hunt. They went up the St. John's River; they left the village of Foxerbica; they went twenty-five miles beyond it. They passed the falls on the upper side to get some game. They cooked and ate. They got ready to start again; they launched the canoe. (Footnote: This story and the preceding are taken _word for word_ from the Indian narration. The singular precision of minute details is very characteristic of many of these legends.) They shoved the canoe twenty-five feet from the shore.... Short Stories - Post by : carefree - Date : July 2011 - Author : Charles G. Leland - Read : 728

Story Of The Three Strong Men Story Of The Three Strong Men

Story Of The Three Strong Men
(Micmac.) There was a chieftain in the days of yore. He had a great desire for a poor girl who was a servant, and who worked for him. To win this girl he first I most lose his wife. He took his wife afar into the woods to gather spruce-gum, and then left her there. She soon found out that she had lost her way, and, wandering, she lost it more and more for many days, until she came at last to a bear's den , going in, she found the Chief of all the bears, who welcomed her, provided for... Short Stories - Post by : vwebb - Date : July 2011 - Author : Charles G. Leland - Read : 1856

The Invisible One The Invisible One

The Invisible One
(Micmac.) There was once a large Indian village situated on the border of a lake,--_Nameskeek' oodun Kuspemku_ (M.). At the end of the place was a lodge, in which dwelt a being who was always invisible. (Footnote: In this Micmac tale, which is manifestly corrupted in many ways, the hero is said to be "a youth whose _teeomul_ (or tutelary animal) was the moose," whence he took his name. In the Passamaquoddy version nothing is said about a moose. A detailed account of the difficulty attending the proper analysis of this tradition will be found at the end of this chapter.)... Short Stories - Post by : kld113 - Date : July 2011 - Author : Charles G. Leland - Read : 934

How One Of The Partridge's Wives Became A Sheldrake Duck How One Of The Partridge's Wives Became A Sheldrake Duck

How One Of The Partridge's Wives Became A Sheldrake Duck
How One of the Partridge's Wives Became a Sheldrake Duck, and Why her Feet and Feathers are Red. _N'karnayoo_, of the old time, there was a hunter who lived in the woods. He had a brother, (Footnote: The word brother is so generally applied in adoption or friendship that it cannot here be taken in a literal sense. The brother in this case seems to have been a goblin or spirit.) who was so small that he kept him in a box, and when he went forth he closed this very carefully, for fear lest an evil spirit (Mitche-hant) should get... Short Stories - Post by : camelot - Date : July 2011 - Author : Charles G. Leland - Read : 2286

The Mournful Mystery Of The Partridge-witch The Mournful Mystery Of The Partridge-witch

The Mournful Mystery Of The Partridge-witch
The Mournful Mystery of the Partridge-witch; Setting Forth How a Young Man died from Love. Of the olden time. Two brothers went hunting in the autumn, and that as far as the head waters of the Penobscot they remained all winter. But in March their snow-shoes (_agahmook_, P.) gave out, as did their moccasins, and they wished that a woman were there to mend them. When the younger brother returned first to the lodge, the next day,-- which he generally did, to get it ready for the elder,--he was astonished to find that some one had been there before him,... Short Stories - Post by : dmack - Date : July 2011 - Author : Charles G. Leland - Read : 1850

How The Partridge Built Good Canoes For All The Birds, And A Bad One For Himself How The Partridge Built Good Canoes For All The Birds, And A Bad One For Himself

How The Partridge Built Good Canoes For All The Birds, And A Bad One For Himself
(How The Partridge Built Good Canoes For All The Birds, And A Bad One For Himself) When a partridge beats upon a hollow log he makes a noise like an Indian at work upon a canoe, and when an Indian taps at a canoe it sounds afar off like the drumming of a partridge, even of _Mitchihess_. And this comes because that _N'karnayoo_, of ancient days, the Partridge, was the canoe builder for all the other birds. Yes, for all at once. And on a certain day they every one assembled, and each got into his bark, and truly it was... Short Stories - Post by : wcapell - Date : July 2011 - Author : Charles G. Leland - Read : 1170

The Story Of A Partridge And His Wonderful Wigwam The Story Of A Partridge And His Wonderful Wigwam

The Story Of A Partridge And His Wonderful Wigwam
Once a man was traveling through the woods, and he heard afar off a sound as of footsteps beating the ground. So he sought to find the people that made it, and went on for a full week ere he came to them. And it was a man and his wife dancing about a tree, in the top of which was a Raccoon. They had, by their constant treading, worn a trench in the ground; indeed, they were in it up to their waists. (Footnote: To dance away the ground, or walk knee-deep in it, was characteristic of wizards. So was... Short Stories - Post by : Lecia - Date : July 2011 - Author : Charles G. Leland - Read : 2044

Origin Of The Black Snakes Origin Of The Black Snakes

Origin Of The Black Snakes
(Passamaquoddy.) Far away, very far in the north, there dwelt by the border of a great lake a man and his wife. They had no children, and the woman was very beautiful and passionate. The lake was frozen over during the greater part of the year. One day when the woman cut away the ice, she saw in the water a bright pair of large eyes looking steadily at her. They charmed her so that she could not move. Then she distinguished a handsome face; it was that of a fine slender young man. He came out of the water. His... Short Stories - Post by : RedSlug - Date : July 2011 - Author : Charles G. Leland - Read : 2961

The Mother Of Serpents The Mother Of Serpents

The Mother Of Serpents
(Passamaquoddy.) There was once a couple well advanced in years. They were powerful and rich in the Indian fashion, but they were unhappy because they had no children. This was near the river St. John's, on the shore of a small lake. After the woman had gone in vain to all the medicine men and _m'teoulin_, she heard of an old doctress, or witch, who lived not very far off. And though hope was almost dead, the witch was consulted. She gave the wife some herbs, and bade her steep them in a pot out-of-doors, and then let them boil. When... Short Stories - Post by : sammy - Date : July 2011 - Author : Charles G. Leland - Read : 2612

Of The Woman Who Loved A Serpent Who Lived In A Lake Of The Woman Who Loved A Serpent Who Lived In A Lake

Of The Woman Who Loved A Serpent Who Lived In A Lake
(Passamaquoddy.) Of old times. There was a very beautiful woman. She turned the heads of all the men. She married, and her husband died very soon after, but she immediately took another. Within a single year she had five husbands, and these were the cleverest and handsomest and bravest in the tribe. And then she married again. This, the sixth, was such a silent man that he passed for a fool. But he was wiser than people thought. He came to believe, by thinking it over, that this woman had some strange secret. He resolved to find it out. So he... Short Stories - Post by : virtualtomcat - Date : July 2011 - Author : Charles G. Leland - Read : 2569

How Two Girls Were Changed To Water-snakes, And Of Two Others That Became Mermai How Two Girls Were Changed To Water-snakes, And Of Two Others That Became Mermai

How Two Girls Were Changed To Water-snakes, And Of Two Others That Became Mermai
(Passamaquoddy.) Pocumkwess, or Thoroughfare, is sixty-five miles from Campobello. There was an Indian village there in the old times. Two young Indian girls had a strange habit of absenting themselves all day every Sunday. No one knew for a long time where they went or what they did. But this was how they passed their time. They would take a canoe and go six miles down the Grand Lake , at the north end, is a great ledge of rock and sixty feet of water. There they stayed. All day long they ran about naked or swam; they were wanton, witch-like... Short Stories - Post by : trouseredape - Date : July 2011 - Author : Charles G. Leland - Read : 2506

Of The Woman Who Married The Thunder, And Of Their Boy Of The Woman Who Married The Thunder, And Of Their Boy

Of The Woman Who Married The Thunder, And Of Their Boy
(Passamaquoddy.) Once a woman went to the edge of a lake (Footnote: It is impossible to distinguish in any Indian story between lake and sea.) and lay down to sleep. As she awoke, she saw a great serpent, with glittering eyes, crawl from the water, and stealthily approach her. She had no power to resist his embrace. After her return to her people her condition betrayed itself, and she was much persecuted; they pursued her with sticks and stones, howling abuse. She fled from the village; she went afar into wild places, and, sitting down on the grass, wept, wishing that... Short Stories - Post by : goodnews - Date : July 2011 - Author : Charles G. Leland - Read : 2537

The Thunder And Lightning Men The Thunder And Lightning Men

The Thunder And Lightning Men
(Passamaquoddy.) This is truly an old Indian story of old time. Once an Indian was whirled up by the roaring wind: he was taken up in a thunder-storm, and set down again in the village of the Thunders. (Footnote: This tale is transcribed, with very little alteration, from a manuscript collection of tales written in Indian-English by an Indian. I retain the word _thunders_ as expressive of the beings in question. It has for title, _A Story called "An Indian transformed into a Thunder!"_) In after-times he described them as very like human beings: they used bows and arrows (_tah-bokque_), and... Short Stories - Post by : Ken_Reno - Date : July 2011 - Author : Charles G. Leland - Read : 3733

How A Hunter Visited The Thunder Spirits Who Dwell In Mount Katahdin How A Hunter Visited The Thunder Spirits Who Dwell In Mount Katahdin

How A Hunter Visited The Thunder Spirits Who Dwell In Mount Katahdin
(Passamaquoddy.) _N'karnayoo_. Of old times. Once an Indian went forth to hunt. And he departed from the east branch of the Penobscot, and came to the head of another branch that leads into the east branch, and this he followed even to the foot of Mount Katahdin. (Footnote: This minuteness of needless detail is very characteristic of Indian tales. I do not think that it is introduced for the sake of local color, or to give an air of truthful seeming, because the Indian simply believes the whole, as it is. I think the reason may be that, owing to their... Short Stories - Post by : MikeAtPFF - Date : July 2011 - Author : Charles G. Leland - Read : 1052

Of The Girl Who Married Mount Katahdin Of The Girl Who Married Mount Katahdin

Of The Girl Who Married Mount Katahdin
Of the Girl who married Mount Katahdin, and how all the Indians brought about their own Ruin. (Penobscot.) Of the old time. There was once an Indian girl gathering blueberries on Mount Katahdin. And, being lonely, she said, "I would that I had a husband!" And seeing the great mountain in all its glory rising on high, with the red sunlight on the top, she added, "I wish Katahdin were a man, and would marry me!" All this she was heard to say ere she went onward and up the mountain, but for three years she was never seen again. Then... Short Stories - Post by : thedealmaker - Date : July 2011 - Author : Charles G. Leland - Read : 1912

The Girl-chenoo The Girl-chenoo

The Girl-chenoo
(Micmac.) Of the old time. Far up the Saguenay River a branch turns off to the north, running back into the land of ice and snow. Ten families went up this stream one autumn in their canoes, to be gone all winter on a hunt. Among them was a beautiful girl, twenty years of age. A young man in the band wished her to become his wife, but she flatly refused him. Perhaps she did it in such a way as to wound his pride; certainly she roused all that was savage in him, and he gave up all his mind... Short Stories - Post by : 46250 - Date : July 2011 - Author : Charles G. Leland - Read : 992

The Story Of The Great Chenoo The Story Of The Great Chenoo

The Story Of The Great Chenoo
(Passamaquoddy.) What the Micmacs call a Chenoo is known to the Passamaquoddies as a _Kewahqu'_ or _Kewoqu'_. And this is their origin. When the _k'tchi m'teoulin_, or Great Big Witch, (Footnote: When legends from the Anglo-Indian manuscript collection of Mitchell are given, many of the phrases or words in the original are retained, without regard to style or correctness. Wizard is here placed for witch.) is conquered by the smaller witches, or _M'teoulinssisk_, they can kill him or turn him into a _Kewahqu'_. He still fights, however, with the other _Kewaquiyck_. When they get ready to fight, they suddenly become as... Short Stories - Post by : themailman - Date : July 2011 - Author : Charles G. Leland - Read : 3623

The Chenoo, Or The Story Of A Cannibal With An Icy Heart The Chenoo, Or The Story Of A Cannibal With An Icy Heart

The Chenoo, Or The Story Of A Cannibal With An Icy Heart
(Micmac and Passamaquoddy.) Of the old time. An Indian, with his wife and their little boy, went one autumn far away to hunt in the northwest. And having found a fit place to pass the winter, they built a wigwam. The man brought home the game, the woman dressed and dried the meat, the small boy played about shooting birds with bow and arrow; in Indian-wise all went well. One afternoon, when the man was away and the wife gathering wood, she heard a rustling in the bushes, as though some beast were brushing through them, and, looking up, she saw... Short Stories - Post by : 36701 - Date : July 2011 - Author : Charles G. Leland - Read : 1665

The Amazing Adventures Of Master Rabbit The Amazing Adventures Of Master Rabbit

The Amazing Adventures Of Master Rabbit
(AMAZING ADVENTURES OF MASTER RABBIT WITH THE OTTER, THE WOODPECKER GIRLS, AND MOOIN THE BEAR ALSO A FULL ACCOUNT OF THE FAMOUS CHASE, IN WHICH HE FOOLED LUSIFEE, THE WILD CAT) I. How Master Rabbit sought to rival Keeoony, the Otter. Of old times, _Mahtigwess_, the Rabbit, who is called in the Micmac tongue _Ableegumooch_, lived with his grandmother, waiting for better times; and truly he found it a hard matter in midwinter, when ice was on the river and snow was on the plain, to provide even for his small household. And running through the forest one day he found... Short Stories - Post by : Jack_Hughes - Date : July 2011 - Author : Charles G. Leland - Read : 2624