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Washington Irving - Chapter 10. Last Years: The Character Of His Literature Washington Irving - Chapter 10. Last Years: The Character Of His Literature

Washington Irving - Chapter 10. Last Years: The Character Of His Literature
CHAPTER X. LAST YEARS: THE CHARACTER OF HIS LITERATUREThe last years of Irving's life, although full of activity and enjoyment,--abated only by the malady which had so long tormented him,--offer little new in the development of his character, and need not much longer detain us. The calls of friendship and of honor were many, his correspondence was large, he made many excursions to scenes that were filled with pleasant memories, going even as far south as Virginia, and he labored assiduously at the "Life of Washington,"--attracted however now and then by some other tempting theme. But his delight was in the... Nonfictions - Post by : Marklouw - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 2835

Washington Irving - Chapter 9. The Characteristic Works Washington Irving - Chapter 9. The Characteristic Works

Washington Irving - Chapter 9. The Characteristic Works
CHAPTER IX. THE CHARACTERISTIC WORKSThe Knickerbocker's "History of New York" and the "Sketch-Book" never would have won for Irving the gold medal of the Royal Society of Literature, or the degree of D.C.L. from Oxford. However much the world would have liked frankly to honor the writer for that which it most enjoyed and was under most obligations for, it would have been a violent shock to the constitution of things to have given such honor to the mere humorist and the writer of short sketches. The conventional literary proprieties must be observed. Only some laborious, solid, and improving work of... Nonfictions - Post by : pujangga - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 2858

Washington Irving - Chapter 8. Return To America: Sunnyside: The Mission To Madrid Washington Irving - Chapter 8. Return To America: Sunnyside: The Mission To Madrid

Washington Irving - Chapter 8. Return To America: Sunnyside: The Mission To Madrid
CHAPTER VIII. RETURN TO AMERICA: SUNNYSIDE: THE MISSION TO MADRIDIn 1831 Mr. Irving was thrown, by his diplomatic position, into the thick of the political and social tumult, when the Reform Bill was pending and war was expected in Europe. It is interesting to note that for a time he laid aside his attitude of the dispassionate observer, and caught the general excitement. He writes in March, expecting that the fate of the cabinet will be determined in a week, looking daily for decisive news from Paris, and fearing dismal tidings from Poland. "However," he goes on to say in a... Nonfictions - Post by : pujangga - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 3242

Washington Irving - Chapter 4. Society And 'Salmagundi' Washington Irving - Chapter 4. Society And "Salmagundi"

Washington Irving - Chapter 4. Society And 'Salmagundi'
CHAPTER IV. SOCIETY AND "SALMAGUNDI"On Irving's return to America in February, 1806, with reestablished health, life did not at first take on a more serious purpose. He was admitted to the bar, but he still halted.(1) Society more than ever attracted him and devoured his time. He willingly accepted the office of "champion at the tea-parties;" he was one of a knot of young fellows of literary tastes and convivial habits, who delighted to be known as "The Nine Worthies," or "Lads of Kilkenny." In his letters of this period I detect a kind of callowness and affectation which is not... Nonfictions - Post by : pujangga - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 1895

Washington Irving - Chapter 3. Manhood: First Visit To Europe Washington Irving - Chapter 3. Manhood: First Visit To Europe

Washington Irving - Chapter 3. Manhood: First Visit To Europe
CHAPTER III. MANHOOD: FIRST VISIT TO EUROPEIrving's health, always delicate, continued so much impaired when he came of age, in 1804, that his brothers determined to send him to Europe. On the 19th of May he took passage for Bordeaux in a sailing vessel, which reached the mouth of the Garonne on the 25th of June. His consumptive appearance when he went on board caused the captain to say to himself, "There's a chap who will go overboard before we get across;" but his condition was much improved by the voyage. He stayed six weeks at Bordeaux to improve himself in... Nonfictions - Post by : pujangga - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 2326

Washington Irving - Chapter 2. Boyhood Washington Irving - Chapter 2. Boyhood

Washington Irving - Chapter 2. Boyhood
CHAPTER II. BOYHOODWashington Irving was born in the city of New York, April 3, 1783. He was the eighth son of William and Sarah Irving, and the youngest of eleven children, three of whom died in infancy. His parents, though of good origin, began life in humble circumstances. His father was born on the island of Shapinska. His family, one of the most respectable in Scotland, traced its descent from William De Irwyn, the secretary and armor-bearer of Robert Bruce; but at the time of the birth of William Irving its fortunes had gradually decayed, and the lad sought his livelihood,... Nonfictions - Post by : pujangga - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 1382

Washington Irving - Chapter 1. Preliminary Washington Irving - Chapter 1. Preliminary

Washington Irving - Chapter 1. Preliminary
CHAPTER I. PRELIMINARYIt is over twenty years since the death of Washington Irving removed that personal presence which is always a powerful, and sometimes the sole, stimulus to the sale of an author's books, and which strongly affects the contemporary judgment of their merits. It is nearly a century since his birth, which was almost coeval with that of the Republic, for it took place the year the British troops evacuated the city of New York, and only a few months before General Washington marched in at the head of the Continental army and took possession of the metropolis. For fifty... Nonfictions - Post by : pujangga - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 843

Saunterings - The Myth Of The Sirens Saunterings - The Myth Of The Sirens

Saunterings - The Myth Of The Sirens
I like to walk upon the encircling ridge behind Sorrento, which commands both bays. From there I can look down upon the Isles of the Sirens. The top is a broad, windy strip of pasture, which falls off abruptly to the Bay of Salerno on the south: a regular embankment of earth runs along the side of the precipitous steeps, towards Sorrento. It appears to be a line of defence for musketry, such as our armies used to throw up: whether the French, who conducted siege operations from this promontory on Capri, under Murat, had anything to do with it, does... Nonfictions - Post by : pujangga - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 1769

Saunterings - St. Maria A Castello Saunterings - St. Maria A Castello

Saunterings - St. Maria A Castello
The Great St. Angelo and that region are supposed to be the haunts of brigands. From those heights they spy out the land, and from thence have, more than once, descended upon the sea-road between Castellamare and Sorrento, and caught up English and German travelers. This elevation commands, also, the Paestum way. We have no faith in brigands in these days; for in all our remote and lonely explorations of this promontory we have never met any but the most simple-hearted and good-natured people, who were quite as much afraid of us as we were of them. But there are not... Nonfictions - Post by : pujangga - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 3394

Saunterings - The Story Of Fiammetta Saunterings - The Story Of Fiammetta

Saunterings - The Story Of Fiammetta
At vespers on the fete of St. Antonino, and in his church, I saw the Signorina Fiammetta. I stood leaning against a marble pillar near the altar-steps, during the service, when I saw the young girl kneeling on the pavement in act of prayer. Her black lace veil had fallen a little back from her head; and there was something in her modest attitude and graceful figure that made her conspicuous among all her kneeling companions, with their gay kerchiefs and bright gowns. When she rose and sat down, with folded hands and eyes downcast, there was something so pensive in... Nonfictions - Post by : why97 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 1733

Saunterings - Children Of The Sun Saunterings - Children Of The Sun

Saunterings - Children Of The Sun
The common people of this region are nothing but children; and ragged, dirty, and poor as they are, apparently as happy, to speak idiomatically, as the day is long. It takes very little to please them; and their easily-excited mirth is contagious. It is very rare that one gets a surly return to a salutation; and, if one shows the least good-nature, his greeting is met with the most jolly return. The boatman hauling in his net sings; the brown girl, whom we meet descending a steep path in the hills, with an enormous bag or basket of oranges on her... Nonfictions - Post by : why97 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 694

Saunterings - A Dry Time Saunterings - A Dry Time

Saunterings - A Dry Time
For three years, once upon a time, it did not rain in Sorrento. Not a drop out of the clouds for three years, an Italian lady here, born in Ireland, assures me. If there was an occasional shower on the Piano during all that drought, I have the confidence in her to think that she would not spoil the story by noticing it. The conformation of the hills encircling the plain would be likely to lead any shower astray, and discharge it into the sea, with whatever good intentions it may have started down the promontory for Sorrento. I can see... Nonfictions - Post by : why97 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 953

Saunterings - Monkish Perches Saunterings - Monkish Perches

Saunterings - Monkish Perches
On heights at either end of the Piano di Sorrento, and commanding it, stood two religious houses: the Convent of the Carnaldoli to the northeast, on the crest of the hill above Meta; the Carthusian Monastery of the Deserto, to the southwest, three miles above Sorrento. The longer I stay here, the more respect I have for the taste of the monks of the Middle Ages. They invariably secured the best places for themselves. They seized all the strategic points; they appropriated all the commanding heights; they knew where the sun would best strike the grapevines; they perched themselves wherever there... Nonfictions - Post by : why97 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 2951

Saunterings - Fascination Saunterings - Fascination

Saunterings - Fascination
There are three places where I should like to live; naming them in the inverse order of preference,--the Isle of Wight, Sorrento, and Heaven. The first two have something in common, the almost mystic union of sky and sea and shore, a soft atmospheric suffusion that works an enchantment, and puts one into a dreamy mood. And yet there are decided contrasts. The superabundant, soaking sunshine of Sorrento is of very different quality from that of the Isle of Wight. On the island there is a sense of home, which one misses on this promontory, the fascination of which, no less... Nonfictions - Post by : why97 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 3376

Saunterings - The Price Of Oranges Saunterings - The Price Of Oranges

Saunterings - The Price Of Oranges
If ever a northern wanderer could be suddenly transported to look down upon the Piano di Sorrento, he would not doubt that he saw the Garden of the Hesperides. The orange-trees cannot well be fuller: their branches bend with the weight of fruit. With the almond-trees in full flower, and with the silver sheen of the olive leaves, the oranges are apples of gold in pictures of silver. As I walk in these sunken roads, and between these high walls, the orange boughs everywhere hang over; and through the open gates of villas I look down alleys of golden glimmer, roses... Nonfictions - Post by : joannent - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 2497

Saunterings - On Top Of The House Saunterings - On Top Of The House

Saunterings - On Top Of The House
The tiptop of the Villa Nardi is a flat roof, with a wall about it three feet high, and some little turreted affairs, that look very much like chimneys. Joseph, the gray-haired servitor, has brought my chair and table up here to-day, and here I am, established to write. I am here above most earthly annoyances, and on a level with the heavenly influences. It has always seemed to me that the higher one gets, the easier it must be to write; and that, especially at a great elevation, one could strike into lofty themes, and launch out, without fear of... Nonfictions - Post by : joannent - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 1499

Saunterings - Sea And Shore Saunterings - Sea And Shore

Saunterings - Sea And Shore
It is not always easy, when one stands upon the highlands which encircle the Piano di Sorrento, in some conditions of the atmosphere, to tell where the sea ends and the sky begins. It seems practicable, at such times, for one to take ship and sail up into heaven. I have often, indeed, seen white sails climbing up there, and fishing-boats, at secure anchor I suppose, riding apparently like balloons in the hazy air. Sea and air and land here are all kin, I suspect, and have certain immaterial qualities in common. The contours of the shores and the outlines of... Nonfictions - Post by : joannent - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 2327

Saunterings - A High Day In Rome Saunterings - A High Day In Rome

Saunterings - A High Day In Rome
PALM SUNDAY IN ST. PETER'S The splendid and tiresome ceremonies of Holy Week set in; also the rain, which held up for two days. Rome without the sun, and with rain and the bone-penetrating damp cold of the season, is a wretched place. Squalor and ruins and cheap splendor need the sun; the galleries need it; the black old masters in the dark corners of the gaudy churches need it; I think scarcely anything of a cardinal's big, blazing footman, unless the sun shines on him, and radiates from his broad back and his splendid calves; the models, who get up... Nonfictions - Post by : joannent - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 2831

Saunterings - Resting-Place Of Caesars--Picture Of A Beautiful Heretic Saunterings - Resting-Place Of Caesars--Picture Of A Beautiful Heretic

Saunterings - Resting-Place Of Caesars--Picture Of A Beautiful Heretic
Very different from the tomb of Dante, and different in the associations it awakes, is the Rotunda or Mausoleum of Theodoric the Goth, outside the Porta Serrata, whose daughter, Amalasuntha, as it is supposed, about the year 530, erected this imposing structure as a certain place "to keep his memory whole and mummy hid" for ever. But the Goth had not lain in it long before Arianism went out of fashion quite, and the zealous Roman Catholics despoiled his costly sleeping-place, and scattered his ashes abroad. I do not know that any dead person has lived in it since. The tomb... Nonfictions - Post by : joannent - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 2326

Saunterings - Dante And Byron Saunterings - Dante And Byron

Saunterings - Dante And Byron
The pilgrim to Ravenna, who has any idea of what is due to the genius of Dante, will be disappointed when he approaches his tomb. Its situation is in a not very conspicuous corner, at the foot of a narrow street, bearing the poet's name, and beside the Church of San Francisco, which is interesting as containing the tombs of the Polenta family, whose hospitality to the wandering exile has rescued their names from oblivion. Opposite the tomb is the shabby old brick house of the Polentas Dante passed many years of his life. It is tenanted now by all... Nonfictions - Post by : joannent - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 1797