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Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 18 Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 18

Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 18
VOLUME I CHAPTER XVIIII wandered over this deserted mansion, in a considerable degree, at random. Effluvia of a pestilential nature assailed me from every corner. In the front room of the second story, I imagined that I discovered vestiges of that catastrophe which the past night had produced. The bed appeared as if some one had recently been dragged from it. The sheets were tinged with yellow, and with that substance which is said to be characteristic of this disease, the gangrenous or black vomit. The floor exhibited similar stains. There are many who will regard my conduct as the last... Long Stories - Post by : Martin_Sojka - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Brockden Brown - Read : 1741

Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 17 Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 17

Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 17
VOLUME I CHAPTER XVIIIt was now incumbent on me to seek the habitation of Thetford. To leave this house accessible to every passenger appeared to be imprudent. I had no key by which I might lock the principal door. I therefore bolted it on the inside, and passed through a window, the shutters of which I closed, though I could not fasten after me. This led me into a spacious court, at the end of which was a brick wall, over which I leaped into the street. This was the means by which I had formerly escaped from the same precincts.... Long Stories - Post by : Martin_Sojka - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Brockden Brown - Read : 2784

Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 16 Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 16

Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 16
VOLUME I CHAPTER XVIThe features of one whom I had seen so transiently as Wallace may be imagined to be not easily recognised, especially when those features were tremulous and deathful. Here, however, the differences were too conspicuous to mislead me. I beheld one in whom I could recollect none that bore resemblance. Though ghastly and livid, the traces of intelligence and beauty were undefaced. The life of Wallace was of more value to a feeble individual; but surely the being that was stretched before me, and who was hastening to his last breath, was precious to thousands. Was he not... Long Stories - Post by : Martin_Sojka - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Brockden Brown - Read : 781

Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 15 Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 15

Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 15
VOLUME I CHAPTER XVThese meditations did not enfeeble my resolution, or slacken my pace. In proportion as I drew near the city, the tokens of its calamitous condition became more apparent. Every farm-house was filled with supernumerary tenants, fugitives from home, and haunting the skirts of the road, eager to detain every passenger with inquiries after news. The passengers were numerous; for the tide of emigration was by no means exhausted. Some were on foot, bearing in their countenances the tokens of their recent terror, and filled with mournful reflections on the forlornness of their state. Few had secured to themselves... Long Stories - Post by : Martin_Sojka - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Brockden Brown - Read : 3241

Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 14 Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 14

Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 14
VOLUME I CHAPTER XIVThis rumour was of a nature to absorb and suspend the whole soul. A certain sublimity is connected with enormous dangers that imparts to our consternation or our pity a tincture of the pleasing. This, at least, may be experienced by those who are beyond the verge of peril. My own person was exposed to no hazard. I had leisure to conjure up terrific images, and to personate the witnesses and sufferers of this calamity. This employment was not enjoined upon me by necessity, but was ardently pursued, and must therefore have been recommended by some nameless charm.... Long Stories - Post by : Martin_Sojka - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Brockden Brown - Read : 2606

Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 10 Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 10

Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 10
VOLUME I CHAPTER X"Having ascertained my purpose, it was requisite to search out the means by which I might effect it. These were not clearly or readily suggested. The more I contemplated my project, the more numerous and arduous its difficulties appeared. I had no associates in my undertaking. A due regard to my safety, and the unextinguished sense of honour, deterred me from seeking auxiliaries and co-agents. The esteem of mankind was the spring of all my activity, the parent of all my virtue and all my vice. To preserve this, it was necessary that my guilty projects should have... Long Stories - Post by : Veselin_Andreev - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Brockden Brown - Read : 697

Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 9 Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 9

Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 9
VOLUME I CHAPTER IXWelbeck did not return, though hour succeeded hour till the clock struck ten. I inquired of the servants, who informed me that their master was not accustomed to stay out so late. I seated myself at a table, in a parlour, on which there stood a light, and listened for the signal of his coming, either by the sound of steps on the pavement without or by a peal from the bell. The silence was uninterrupted and profound, and each minute added to my sum of impatience and anxiety. To relieve myself from the heat of the weather,... Long Stories - Post by : Veselin_Andreev - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Brockden Brown - Read : 1851

Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 8 Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 8

Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 8
VOLUME I CHAPTER VIIIThis extraordinary interview was now past. Pleasure as well as pain attended my reflections on it. I adhered to the promise I had improvidently given to Welbeck, but had excited displeasure, and perhaps suspicion, in the lady. She would find it hard to account for my silence. She would probably impute it to perverseness, or imagine it to flow from some incident connected with the death of Clavering, calculated to give a new edge to her curiosity. It was plain that some connection subsisted between her and Welbeck. Would she drop the subject at the point which it... Long Stories - Post by : Veselin_Andreev - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Brockden Brown - Read : 2149

Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 7 Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 7

Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 7
VOLUME I CHAPTER VIIAfter viewing various parts of the city, intruding into churches, and diving into alleys, I returned. The rest of the day I spent chiefly in my chamber, reflecting on my new condition; surveying my apartment, its presses and closets; and conjecturing the causes of appearances. At dinner and supper I was alone. Venturing to inquire of the servant where his master and mistress were, I was answered that they were engaged. I did not question him as to the nature of their engagement, though it was a fertile source of curiosity. Next morning, at breakfast, I again met... Long Stories - Post by : Veselin_Andreev - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Brockden Brown - Read : 758

Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 6 Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 6

Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 6
VOLUME I CHAPTER VIIn a short time the lady retired. I naturally expected that some comments would be made on her behaviour, and that the cause of her surprise and distress on seeing me would be explained; but Welbeck said nothing on that subject. When she had gone, he went to the window and stood for some time occupied, as it seemed, with his own thoughts. Then he turned to me, and, calling me by my name, desired me to accompany him up-stairs. There was neither cheerfulness nor mildness in his address, but neither was there any thing domineering or arrogant.... Long Stories - Post by : Veselin_Andreev - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Brockden Brown - Read : 1581

Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 5 Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 5

Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 5
VOLUME I CHAPTER VNow I was once more on public ground. By so many anxious efforts had I disengaged myself from the perilous precincts of private property. As many stratagems as are usually made to enter a house had been employed by me to get out of it. I was urged to the use of them by my fears; yet, so far from carrying off spoil, I had escaped with the loss of an essential part of my dress. I had now leisure to reflect. I seated myself on the ground and reviewed the scenes through which I had just passed.... Long Stories - Post by : Veselin_Andreev - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Brockden Brown - Read : 1860

Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 4 Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 4

Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Volume 1 - Chapter 4
VOLUME I CHAPTER IVWe arrived at a brick wall, through which we passed by a gate into an extensive court or yard. The darkness would allow me to see nothing but outlines. Compared with the pigmy dimensions of my father's wooden hovel, the buildings before me were of gigantic loftiness. The horses were here far more magnificently accommodated than I had been. By a large door we entered an elevated hall. "Stay here," said he, "just while I fetch a light." He returned, bearing a candle, before I had time to ponder on my present situation. We now ascended a staircase,... Long Stories - Post by : Veselin_Andreev - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Brockden Brown - Read : 1954

Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Preface Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Preface

Arthur Mervyn; Or, Memoirs Of The Year 1793 - Preface
The evils of pestilence by which this city has lately been afflicted will probably form an era in its history. The schemes of reformation and improvement to which they will give birth, or, if no efforts of human wisdom can avail to avert the periodical visitations of this calamity, the change in manners and population which they will produce, will be, in the highest degree, memorable. They have already supplied new and copious materials for reflection to the physician and the political economist. They have not been less fertile of instruction to the moral observer, to whom they have furnished new... Long Stories - Post by : cjv01 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Brockden Brown - Read : 3087

Jane Talbot - Letter 70 - To Henry Golden Jane Talbot - Letter 70 - To Henry Golden

Jane Talbot - Letter 70 - To Henry Golden
Letter LXX - To Henry GoldenTo Henry Golden New York, February 12. And are you then alive? Are you then returned? Still do you remember, still love, the ungrateful and capricious Jane? Have you indeed come back to soothe her almost broken heart,--to rescue her from the grave,--to cheer her with the prospect of peaceful and bright days yet to come? Oh, my full heart! Sorrow has not hitherto been able quite to burst this frail tenement. I almost fear that joy,--so strange to me is joy, and so far, so very far, beyond my notions of possibility was your return,--I... Long Stories - Post by : cjv01 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Brockden Brown - Read : 2728

Jane Talbot - Letter 69 - To Mr. Montford Jane Talbot - Letter 69 - To Mr. Montford

Jane Talbot - Letter 69 - To Mr. Montford
Letter LXIX - To Mr. MontfordTo Mr. Montford New Haven, February 10. My dear friend:-- This letter is written in extreme pain; yet no pain that I ever felt, no external pain possible for me to feel, is equal to the torment I derive from suspense. Good Heaven! what an untoward accident! to be forcibly immured in a tavern-chamber; when the distance is so small between me and that certainty after which my soul pants! I ought not thus to alarm my beloved friends, but I know not what I write: my head is in confusion, my heart in tumults; a... Long Stories - Post by : cjv01 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Brockden Brown - Read : 1951

Jane Talbot - Letter 68 - To Mrs. Montford Jane Talbot - Letter 68 - To Mrs. Montford

Jane Talbot - Letter 68 - To Mrs. Montford
Letter LXVIII - To Mrs. MontfordTo Mrs. Montford Banks of Delaware, November 26. I beseech you, dear Mrs. Montford, take some measures for drawing our dear Jane from this place. There is no remedy but absence from this spot, cheerful company and amusing engagements, for the sullen grief which has seized her. Ever since the arrival of your letter, giving us the fatal tidings of your brother's misfortune, she has been--in a strange way--I am almost afraid to tell you. I know how much you love her; but, indeed, indeed, unless somebody with more spirit and skill than I possess will... Long Stories - Post by : cjv01 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Brockden Brown - Read : 1622

Jane Talbot - Letter 67 - To Mrs. Talbot Jane Talbot - Letter 67 - To Mrs. Talbot

Jane Talbot - Letter 67 - To Mrs. Talbot
Letter LXVII - To Mrs. TalbotTo Mrs. Talbot New York, November 23. You do not write to me, my dear Jane. Why are you silent? Surely you cannot be indifferent to my happiness. You must know how painful, at a moment like this, your silence must prove. I have waited from day to day in expectation of a letter; but more than a week has passed, and none has come. Let me hear from you immediately, I entreat you. I am afraid you are ill; or perhaps you are displeased with me. Unconsciously I may have given you offence. But, indeed,... Long Stories - Post by : cjv01 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Brockden Brown - Read : 2228

Jane Talbot - Letter 66 - To Jane Talbot Jane Talbot - Letter 66 - To Jane Talbot

Jane Talbot - Letter 66 - To Jane Talbot
Letter LXVI - To Jane TalbotTo Jane Talbot New York, November 15. The fear that what I have to communicate may be imparted more abruptly and with false or exaggerated circumstances induces me to write to you. Yesterday week, a ship arrived in this port from Batavia, in which my husband's brother, Stephen Montford, came passenger. You will be terrified at these words; but calm your apprehensions. Harry does _not accompany him, it is true, nor are we acquainted with his present situation. The story of their unfortunate voyage cannot be minutely related now. Suffice it to say that a wicked... Long Stories - Post by : cjv01 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Brockden Brown - Read : 1657

Jane Talbot - Letter 65 - To G. Cartwright Jane Talbot - Letter 65 - To G. Cartwright

Jane Talbot - Letter 65 - To G. Cartwright
Letter LXV - To G. CartwrightTo G. Cartwright Banks of Delaware, October 5. My brother:-- It would avail me nothing to deny the confessions to which you allude. Neither will I conceal from you that I am much grieved at the discovery. Far am I from deeming your good opinion of little value; but in this case I was more anxious to deserve it than possess it. Little, indeed, did you know me, when you imagined me insensible to your merit and forgetful of the happy days of our childhood,--the recollection of which has a thousand times made my tears flow.... Long Stories - Post by : cjv01 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Brockden Brown - Read : 3179

Jane Talbot - Letter 61 - To Mrs. Talbot Jane Talbot - Letter 61 - To Mrs. Talbot

Jane Talbot - Letter 61 - To Mrs. Talbot
Letter LXI - To Mrs. TalbotTo Mrs. Talbot New York, October 22. You tell me, my dear Jane, that you are coming to reside in this city; but you have not gratified my impatience by saying how soon. Tell me when you propose to come. Is there not something in which I can be of service to you?--some preparations to be made? Tell me the day when you expect to arrive among us, that I may wait on you as soon as possible. I shall embrace my sister with a delight which I cannot express. I will not part with the... Long Stories - Post by : cjv01 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Brockden Brown - Read : 2742