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Wild Animals From The Indian Stand-point Wild Animals From The Indian Stand-point

Wild Animals From The Indian Stand-point
"Tula, tula, kola, the game is plentiful--once more the flats of the Cheyenne are covered with buffalo--winter is still at a distance and all is well!" Thus laughingly exclaimed old Hohay as he approached the teepee of Sheyaka, a renowned hunter of the Sioux. "Ugh, you are all here, even Kangee and Katola. What is in your minds?" he continued, as he entered and took his seat. "Ho, brother-in-law, it is good of you to join us. We are merely enjoying our smoke," replied the genial host. "Ah, you are still the coyote that you were in your younger days! Smoke... Short Stories - Post by : jabberwocky - Date : November 2011 - Author : Charles Alexander Eastman - Read : 811

The Challenge The Challenge

The Challenge
The medicine-drum was struck with slow, monotonous beat--that sound which always comes forth from the council-lodge with an impressive air of authority. Upon this particular occasion it was merely a signal to open the ears of the people. It was the prelude to an announcement of the day's programme, including the names of those warriors who had been chosen to supply the governing body with food and tobacco during that day. These names were presently announced in a sing-song or chanting call which penetrated to the outskirts of the Indian village. Just as Tawahinkpayota, or Many Arrows, was cutting up a... Short Stories - Post by : mjoyner2004 - Date : November 2011 - Author : Charles Alexander Eastman - Read : 1670

The River People The River People

The River People
Away up the Pipestone Creek, within sight of the Great Pipestone Quarry, lived old Chapawee and her old man Hezee, of the beaver tribe. Unlike some of their neighbors, they had emigrated from a great distance. They had, therefore, much valuable experience; and this experience was not theirs alone--it was shared with their immediate family. Hence their children and their children's children were uncommonly wise. They had come to this country many years before, and had established their home in this ancient and much-prized resort of the two-legged tribe. Around the Pipestone Quarry the wild Red men would camp in large... Short Stories - Post by : Mothergoose - Date : November 2011 - Author : Charles Alexander Eastman - Read : 2250

Hootay Of The Little Rosebud Hootay Of The Little Rosebud

Hootay Of The Little Rosebud
On the south side of Scout Butte there is a crescent-shaped opening, walled in by the curving sides of the hill. This little plain cannot be seen from the top of the butte. There is a terrace upon its brow on which a few scrub pines grow, so regularly that one would think them set there by human hands. Half-way up the incline there stood at one time a lone cedar-tree, and at its foot there might have been discerned a flat, soft mound. It consisted of earth thrown up from the diggings of a cavern. The wild people approaching from... Short Stories - Post by : Jim_Hutton - Date : November 2011 - Author : Charles Alexander Eastman - Read : 1710

The Gray Chieftain The Gray Chieftain

The Gray Chieftain
On the westernmost verge of Cedar Butte stood Haykinshkah and his mate. They looked steadily toward the setting sun, over a landscape which up to that time had scarcely been viewed by man--the inner circle of the Bad Lands. Cedar Butte guards the southernmost entrance to that wonderland, standing fully a thousand feet above the surrounding country, and nearly half a mile long by a quarter of a mile wide. The summit is a level, grassy plain, its edges heavily fringed with venerable cedars. To attempt the ascent of this butte is like trying to scale the walls of Babylon, for... Short Stories - Post by : sidneiye - Date : November 2011 - Author : Charles Alexander Eastman - Read : 796

A Founder Of Ten Towns A Founder Of Ten Towns

A Founder Of Ten Towns
Upon a grassy plateau, overlooking the flats of the Owl River, was spread out Pezpeza's town. The borders of the table-land were defined by the river's bed, and it was sufficiently high for the little inhabitants to command the valley both up and down for a considerable distance. Shungela Pahah, or Fox Ridge, stretched upward on the horizon, and the rough country back of it formed many ravines and gulches for the solitary habitations of wolves and foxes. No prettier site could be imagined for a town of the prairie-dog people, among whom there is no more enterprising frontiersman than Pezpeza.... Short Stories - Post by : Remco_Buining - Date : November 2011 - Author : Charles Alexander Eastman - Read : 841

The Sky Warrior The Sky Warrior

The Sky Warrior
The all-night rain had ceased, and daylight appeared once more over the eastern buttes. Hooyah looked about her, anxiously scanning the gray dusk of morning for a glimpse of her mate, the while she spread her long pinions over three rollicking and mischievous youngsters as any eagle woman ever brooded. Her piercing gaze was directed oftenest toward the lone pine--his favorite sleeping-tree. Surely it was time for him to call her out on the usual morning hunt. The Eagle's Nest butte was well known to the wild hunters of that region, since it could be seen from a great distance and... Short Stories - Post by : mpibizsa - Date : November 2011 - Author : Charles Alexander Eastman - Read : 1092

The Mustering Of The Herds The Mustering Of The Herds

The Mustering Of The Herds
"Moo! Moo!" rang out the deep, air-rending call--the gathering call of the herds! Hinpoha, or Curly Hair, the young bison mother, threw back her head and listened nervously. She stood over her new-born baby in a hidden nook upon the Shaeyela River, that flows through the Land of Mystery. No one was there to see, except two magpies which were loitering in the neighborhood, apparently waiting for the mother to go away that they might tease the helpless infant. Tenderly she licked the moist hair of her dear one's coat, while the beautiful black-and-white bird with the long tail talked to... Short Stories - Post by : Andrew_Pearson - Date : November 2011 - Author : Charles Alexander Eastman - Read : 2333

Wechah The Provider Wechah The Provider

Wechah The Provider
"Come, Wechah, come away! the dogs will tease you dreadfully if they find you up a tree. Enakanee (hurry)!" Wasula urged, but the mischievous Wechah still chose to remain upon the projecting limb of an oak which made him a comfortable seat. It was apparently a great temptation to him to climb every large, spreading tree that came in his way, and Wasula had had some thrilling experiences with her pet when he had been attacked by the dogs of the camp and even by wild animals, so it was no wonder that she felt some anxiety for him. Wasula was... Short Stories - Post by : Bill_Hely - Date : November 2011 - Author : Charles Alexander Eastman - Read : 2557

The Dance Of The Little People The Dance Of The Little People

The Dance Of The Little People
In full view of Wetaota, upon an open terrace half-way up the side of the hill in the midst of virgin Big Woods, there were grouped in an irregular circle thirty teepees of the Sioux. The yellowish-white skin cones contrasted quite naturally with the variegated foliage of September, yet all of the woodland people knew well that they had not been there on the day before. Wetaota, the Lake of Many Islands, lies at the heart of Haya Tanka, the Big Mountain. It is the chosen home of many wild tribes. Here the crane, the Canadian goose, the loon, and other... Short Stories - Post by : patstone - Date : November 2011 - Author : Charles Alexander Eastman - Read : 3155

On Wolf Mountain On Wolf Mountain

On Wolf Mountain
On the eastern slope of the Big Horn Mountains, the Mayala clan of gray wolves, they of the Steep Places, were following on the trail of a herd of elk. It was a day in late autumn. The sun had appeared for an instant, and then passed behind a bank of cold cloud. Big flakes of snow were coming down, as the lean, gray hunters threaded a long ravine, cautiously stopping at every knoll or divide to survey the outlook before continuing their uncertain pursuit. The large Mayala wolf with his mate and their five full-grown pups had been driven away... Short Stories - Post by : Gilbert - Date : November 2011 - Author : Charles Alexander Eastman - Read : 3388

The Great Cat's Nursery The Great Cat's Nursery

The Great Cat's Nursery
A harsh and hateful cry of a sudden broke the peace of a midsummer night upon the creek called Bear-runs-in-the-Lodge. It told many things to the Red hunter, who, though the hour was late, still sat beside the dying camp-fire, pulling away at his long-stemmed pipe. "Ugh!" he muttered, as he turned his head in the direction of the deep woods and listened attentively. The great cat's scream was not repeated. The hunter resumed his former attitude and continued to smoke. The night was sultry and threatened storm, and all creatures, especially the fiercer wild animals, become nervous and irritable when... Short Stories - Post by : jerry_tire5 - Date : November 2011 - Author : Charles Alexander Eastman - Read : 3196

The Soul Of The Indian, An Interpretation The Soul Of The Indian, An Interpretation

The Soul Of The Indian, An Interpretation
Author: (AKA Ohiyesa), Charles A. Eastman TO MY WIFE ELAINE GOODALE EASTMAN IN GRATEFUL RECOGNITION OF HER EVER-INSPIRING COMPANIONSHIP IN THOUGHT AND WORK AND IN LOVE OF HER MOST INDIAN-LIKE VIRTUES I DEDICATE THIS BOOK  I speak for each no-tongued tree That, spring by spring, doth nobler be, And dumbly and most wistfully... Nonfictions - Post by : cline354 - Date : November 2011 - Author : Charles Alexander Eastman - Read : 2222

Hole-in-the-day Hole-in-the-day

Hole-in-the-day
(I wish to thank Reverend C. H. Beaulieu of Le Soeur, Minnesota, for much of the material used in this chapter.) In the beginning of the nineteenth century, the Indian nations of the Northwest first experienced the pressure of civilization. At this period there were among them some brilliant leaders unknown to history, for the curious reason that they cordially received and welcomed the newcomers rather than opposed them. The only difficulties were those arising among the European nations themselves, and often involving the native tribes. Thus new environments brought new motives, and our temptations were increased manyfold with the new... Short Stories - Post by : jamn1.1 - Date : November 2011 - Author : Charles Alexander Eastman - Read : 2611

Little Wolf Little Wolf

Little Wolf
If any people ever fought for liberty and justice, it was the Cheyennes. If any ever demonstrated their physical and moral courage beyond cavil, it was this race of purely American heroes, among whom Little Wolf was a leader. I knew the chief personally very well. As a young doctor, I was sent to the Pine Ridge agency in 1890, as government physician to the Sioux and the Northern Cheyennes. While I heard from his own lips of that gallant dash of his people from their southern exile to their northern home, I prefer that Americans should read of it in... Short Stories - Post by : george2 - Date : November 2011 - Author : Charles Alexander Eastman - Read : 3101

Chief Joseph Chief Joseph

Chief Joseph
The Nez Perce tribe of Indians, like other tribes too large to be united under one chief, was composed of several bands, each distinct in sovereignty. It was a loose confederacy. Joseph and his people occupied the Imnaha or Grande Ronde valley in Oregon, which was considered perhaps the finest land in that part of the country. When the last treaty was entered into by some of the bands of the Nez Perce, Joseph's band was at Lapwai, Idaho, and had nothing to do with the agreement. The elder chief in dying had counseled his son, then not more than twenty-two... Short Stories - Post by : encsteph - Date : November 2011 - Author : Charles Alexander Eastman - Read : 1454

Roman Nose Roman Nose

Roman Nose
This Cheyenne war chief was a contemporary of Dull Knife. He was not so strong a character as the other, and was inclined to be pompous and boastful; but with all this he was a true type of native American in spirit and bravery. While Dull Knife was noted in warfare among Indians, Roman Nose made his record against the whites, in defense of territory embracing the Republican and Arickaree rivers. He was killed on the latter river in 1868, in the celebrated battle with General Forsythe. Save Chief Gall and Washakie in the prime of their manhood, this chief had... Short Stories - Post by : coastal99 - Date : November 2011 - Author : Charles Alexander Eastman - Read : 3206

Dull Knife Dull Knife

Dull Knife
The life of Dull Knife, the Cheyenne, is a true hero tale. Simple, child-like yet manful, and devoid of selfish aims, or love of gain, he is a pattern for heroes of any race. Dull Knife was a chief of the old school. Among all the Indians of the plains, nothing counts save proven worth. A man's caliber is measured by his courage, unselfishness and intelligence. Many writers confuse history with fiction, but in Indian history their women and old men and even children witness the main events, and not being absorbed in daily papers and magazines, these events are rehearsed... Short Stories - Post by : shashi - Date : November 2011 - Author : Charles Alexander Eastman - Read : 1537

American Horse American Horse

American Horse
One of the wittiest and shrewdest of the Sioux chiefs was American Horse, who succeeded to the name and position of an uncle, killed in the battle of Slim Buttes in 1876. The younger American Horse was born a little before the encroachments of the whites upon the Sioux country became serious and their methods aggressive, and his early manhood brought him into that most trying and critical period of our history. He had been tutored by his uncle, since his own father was killed in battle while he was still very young. The American Horse band was closely attached to... Short Stories - Post by : cgiguy - Date : November 2011 - Author : Charles Alexander Eastman - Read : 1812

Two Strike Two Strike

Two Strike
It is a pity that so many interesting names of well-known Indians have been mistranslated, so that their meaning becomes very vague if it is not wholly lost. In some cases an opposite meaning is conveyed. For instance there is the name, "Young-Man-Afraid-of-His-Horses." It does not mean that the owner of the name is afraid of his own horse--far from it! Tashunkekokipapi signifies "The young men (of the enemy) fear his horses." Whenever that man attacks, the enemy knows there will be a determined charge. The name Tashunkewitko, or Crazy Horse, is a poetic simile. This leader was likened to an... Short Stories - Post by : markp - Date : November 2011 - Author : Charles Alexander Eastman - Read : 2681