Full Online Books
BOOK CATEGORIES
Authors Authors Short Stories Short Stories Long Stories Long Stories Funny Stories Funny Stories Love Stories Love Stories Stories For Kids Stories For Kids Poems Poems Essays Essays Nonfictions Nonfictions Plays Plays Folktales Folktales Fairy Tales Fairy Tales Fables Fables Learning Kitchen Learning Kitchen
LINKS
Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional Free Classified Website Without Registration Free Classified Website Best Url Shortener
Twitter Twitter Add book
donate
Full Online Book HomeAuthor Ben JonsonPage 1
Famous Authors (View All Authors)

Discoveries Made Upon Men And Matter - What Is A Poet? Poem?--Poem, Poesy, Fable... Discoveries Made Upon Men And Matter - What Is A Poet? Poem?--Poem, Poesy, Fable...

Discoveries Made Upon Men And Matter - What Is A Poet? Poem?--Poem, Poesy, Fable...
What is a Poet? Poeta.--A poet is that which by the Greeks is called (Greek text), a maker, or a feigner: his art, an art of imitation or feigning; expressing the life of man in fit measure, numbers, and harmony, according to Aristotle; from the word (Greek text), which signifies to make or feign. Hence he is called a poet, not he which writeth in measure only, but that feigneth and formeth a fable, and writes things like the truth. For the fable and fiction is, as it were, the form and soul of any poetical work or... Nonfictions - Post by : AndyW - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 922

Discoveries Made Upon Men And Matter - Discoveries (cont.) Discoveries Made Upon Men And Matter - Discoveries (cont.)

Discoveries Made Upon Men And Matter - Discoveries (cont.)
Ingeniorum discrimina.--Not. 1.--In the difference of wits I have observed there are many notes; and it is a little maistry to know them, to discern what every nature, every disposition will bear; for before we sow our land we should plough it. There are no fewer forms of minds than of bodies amongst us. The variety is incredible, and therefore we must search. Some are fit to make divines, some poets, some lawyers, some physicians; some to be sent to the plough, and trades. There is no doctrine will do good where nature is wanting. Some wits... Nonfictions - Post by : AndyW - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 1826

Discoveries Made Upon Men And Matter - Timber; Or, Discoveries Made Upon Men And Matter Discoveries Made Upon Men And Matter - Timber; Or, Discoveries Made Upon Men And Matter

Discoveries Made Upon Men And Matter - Timber; Or, Discoveries Made Upon Men And Matter
TIMBER;OR,DISCOVERIES MADE UPON MEN AND MATTER,AS THEY HAVE FLOWED OUT OF HIS DAILY READINGS,OR HAD THEIR REFLUX TO HIS PECULIARNOTION OF THE TIMES.Tecum habita, ut noris quam sit tibi curta supellex {11}PERS. Sat. 4.Footnote: {11} "So live with yourself that you do not know how ill yow mind is furnished." Fortuna.--Ill fortune never crushed that man whom good fortune deceived not. I therefore have counselled my friends never to trust to her fairer side, though she seemed to make peace with them; but to place all things she gave them, so as she might ask them again without... Nonfictions - Post by : AndyW - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 3333

Discoveries Made Upon Men And Matter - Introduction Discoveries Made Upon Men And Matter - Introduction

Discoveries Made Upon Men And Matter - Introduction
Ben Jonson's "Discoveries" are, as he says in the few Latin words prefixed to them, "A wood--Sylva--of things and thoughts, in Greek "(Greek text)" (which has for its first meaning material, but is also applied peculiarly to kinds of wood, and to a wood), "from the multiplicity and variety of the material contained in it. For, as we are commonly used to call the infinite mixed multitude of growing trees a wood, so the ancients gave the name of Sylvae--Timber Trees--to books of theirs in which small works of various and diverse matter were promiscuously brought together." In this little... Nonfictions - Post by : Allnewe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 1712

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 5 Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 5

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 5
ACT V - SCENE VSCENE V. -- A ROOM IN DELIRO'S HOUSE. (ENTER MACILENTE AND DELIRO.) MACI. Tut, sir, you did bear too hard a conceit of me in that; but I will not make my love to you most transparent, in spite of any dust of suspicion that may be raised to cloud it; and henceforth, since I see it is so against your humour, I will never labour to persuade you. DELI. Why, I thank you, signior; but what is that you tell me may concern my peace so much? MACI. Faith, sir, 'tist hus. Your wife's brother,... Plays - Post by : Allnewe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 656

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 4 Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 4

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 4
ACT V - SCENE IVSCENE IV. -- A ROOM AT THE MITRE. (ENTER CARLO.) CAR. Holla! where be these shot-sharks? (ENTER DRAWER.) DRAW. By and by; you are welcome, good master Buffone. CAR.Where's George? call me George hither, quickly. DRAW. What wine please you have, sir? I'll draw you that's neat, master Buffone. CAR.Away, neophite, do as I bid thee, bring my dear George to me: -- (ENTER GEORGE.) Mass, here he comes. GEORGE.Welcome, master Carlo. CAR.What, is supper ready, George? GEORGE.Ay, sir, almost: Will you have the cloth laid, master Carlo? CAR.O, what else? Are... Plays - Post by : Allnewe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 2976

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 3 Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 3

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 3
ACT V - SCENE IIISCENE III. -- THE PALACE STAIRS. (ENTER SHIFT.) SHIFT. I am come to the court, to meet with my Countenance, Sogliardo; poor men must be glad of such countenance, when they can get no better. Well, need may insult upon a man, but it shall never make him despair of consequence. The world will say, 'tis base: tush, base! 'tis base to live under the earth, not base to live above it by any means. (ENTER FASTIDIOUS, PUNTARVOLO, SOGLIARDO, FUNGOSO, AND MACILENTE.) FAST. The poor lady is most miserably out of her humour, i'faith.... Plays - Post by : Allnewe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 2113

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 2 Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 2

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 2
ACT V - SCENE IISCENE II. -- AN APARTMENT IN THE PALACE. (ENTER SAVIOLINA, PUNTARVOLO, FASTIDIOUS BRISK, AND FUNGOSO.) SAV.Why, I thought, sir Puntarvolo, you had been gone your voyage? PUNT.Dear and most amiable lady, your divine beauties do bind me to those offices, that I cannot depart when I would. SAV.'Tis most court-like spoken, sir; but how might we do to have a sight of your dog and cat? FAST.His dog is in the court, lady. SAV.And not your cat? how dare you trust her behind you, sir. PUNT. Troth, madam, she hath sore eyes, and she doth keep... Plays - Post by : Allnewe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 2694

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 1 Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 1

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 1
ACT V - SCENE ISCENE I. -- THE PALACE STAIRS. (ENTER PUNTARVOLO, WITH HIS DOG, FOLLOWED BY FASTIDIOUS BRISK AND FUNGOSO.) PUNT.Come, gentles, Signior, you are sufficiently instructed. FAST.Who, I, sir? PUNT.No, this gentleman. But stay, I take thought how to bestow my dog; he is no competent attendant for the presence. FAST.Mass, that's true, indeed, knight; you must not carry him into the presence. PUNT. I know it, and I, like a dull beast, forgot to bring one of my cormorants to attend me. FAST.Why, you were best leave him at the porter's lodge. PUNT. Not so; his worth... Plays - Post by : Allnewe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 2145

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 4 - Scene 6 Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 4 - Scene 6

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 4 - Scene 6
ACT IV - SCENE VISCENE VI. -- PUNTARVOLO'S LODGINGS. (ENTER PUNTARVOLO, FASTIDIOUS BRISK IN A NEW SUIT, AND SERVANTS WITH THE DOG.) PUNT.Well, now my whole venture is forth, I will resolve to depart shortly. FAST. Faith, sir Puntarvolo, go to the court, and take leave of the ladies first. PUNT.I care not, if it be this afternoon's labour. Where is Carlo? FAST.Here he comes. (ENTER CARLO, SOGLIARDO, SHIFT, AND MACILENTE.) CAR. Faith, gallants, I am persuading this gentleman (POINTS TO SOGLIARDO) to turn courtier. He is a man of fair revenue, and his estate will bear the charge... Plays - Post by : Allnewe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 2976

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 4 - Scene 5 Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 4 - Scene 5

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 4 - Scene 5
ACT IV - SCENE VSCENE V. -- A ROOM IN DELIRO'S HOUSE (ENTER FUNGOSO IN A NEW SUIT, FOLLOWED BY HIS TAILOR, SHOEMAKER, AND HABERDASHER.) FUNG. Gramercy, good shoemaker, I'll put to strings myself.. (EXIT SHOEMAKER.) -- Now, sir, let me see, what must you have for this hat? HABE. Here's the bill, sir. FUNG. How does it become me, well? TAI. Excellent, sir, as ever you had any hat in your life. FUNG. Nay, you'll say so all. HABE. In faith, sir, the hat's as good as any man in this town can serve you, and will maintain fashion as... Plays - Post by : Allnewe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 1008

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 4 - Scene 1 Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 4 - Scene 1

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 4 - Scene 1
ACT IV - SCENE ISCENE I. -- A ROOM IN DELIRO'S HOUSE. (ENTER FUNGOSO, FALLACE FOLLOWING HIM.) FAL. Why are you so melancholy, brother? FUNG. I am not melancholy, I thank you, sister. FAL. Why are you not merry then? there are but two of us in all the world, and if we should not be comforts one to another, God help us! FUNG. Faith, I cannot tell, sister; but if a man had any true melancholy in him, it would make him melancholy to see his yeomanly father cut his neighbours' throats, to make his son a gentleman; and... Plays - Post by : Allnewe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 2216

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 3 - Scene 3 Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 3 - Scene 3

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 3 - Scene 3
ACT III - SCENE IIISCENE III. -- AN APARTMENT AT THE COURT (ENTER MACILENTE, FASTIDIOUS, BOTH IN A NEW SUIT, AND CINEDO, WITH TOBACCO.) FAST. Well, now signior Macilente, you are not only welcome to the court, but also to my mistress's withdrawing chamber -- Boy, get me some tobacco. I'll but go in, and shew I am here, and come to you presently, sir. (EXIT.) MACI. What's that he said? by heaven, I mark'd him not:My thoughts and I were of another world.I was admiring mine own outside here,To think what privilege and palm it bearsHere,... Plays - Post by : Allnewe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 3409

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 3 - Scene 2 Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 3 - Scene 2

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 3 - Scene 2
ACT III - SCENE IISCENE II. -- THE COUNTRY. (ENTER SORDIDO, WITH A HALTER ABOUT HIS NECK.) SORD.Nay, God's precious, if the weather and season be so respectless, that beggars shall live as well as their betters; and that my hunger and thirst for riches shall not make them hunger and thirst with poverty; that my sleep shall be broken, and their hearts not broken; that my coffers shall be full, and yet care; their's empty, and yet merry; -- 'tis time that a cross should bear flesh and blood, since flesh and blood cannot bear this cross. MIT. What, will... Plays - Post by : Allnewe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 966

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 3 - Scene 1 Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 3 - Scene 1

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 3 - Scene 1
ACT III - SCENE ISCENE I. -- THE MIDDLE AISLE OF ST. PAUL'S. SHIFT. (COMING FORWARD.) This is rare, I have set up my bills without discovery. (ENTER ORANGE.) ORANGE. What, signior Whiffe! what fortune has brought you into these west parts? SHIFT. Troth, signior, nothing but your rheum; I have been taking an ounce of tobacco hard by here, with a gentleman, and I am come to spit private in Paul's. 'Save you, sir. ORANGE. Adieu, good signior Whiffe. (PASSES ONWARD.) (ENTER CLOVE.) CLOVE. Master Apple-John! you are well met; when shall we sup together, and... Plays - Post by : Allnewe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 2949

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 2 - Scene 2 Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 2 - Scene 2

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 2 - Scene 2
ACT II - SCENE IISCENE II. A ROOM IN DELIRO'S HOUSE.(ENTER DELIRO, MACILENTE, AND FIDO WITH FLOWERS AND PERFUMES.)DELI. I'll tell you by and by, sir, --Welcome good Macilente, to my house,To sojourn even for ever; if my bestin cates, and every sort of good entreaty,May move you stay with me.(HE CENSETH: THE BOY STREWS FLOWERS.)MACI. I thank you, sir. --And yet the muffled Fates, had it pleased them,Might have supplied me from their own full store.Without this word, 'I thank you', to a fool.I see no reason why that dog call'd Chance,Should fawn upon this fellow more than... Plays - Post by : Allnewe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 3214

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 2 - Scene 1 Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 2 - Scene 1

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 2 - Scene 1
ACT II - SCENE ISCENE I. -- THE COUNTRY; BEFORE PUNTARVOLO'S HOUSE. (ENTER FASTIDIOUS BRISK, CINEDO, CARLO BUFFONE, AND SOGLIARDO.) FAST. Cinedo, watch when the knight comes, and give us word. CIN. I will, sir. (EXIT.) FAST.How lik'st thou my boy, Carlo? CAR. O, well, well. He looks like a colonel of the Pigmies horse, or one of these motions in a great antique clock; he would shew well upon a haberdasher's stall, at a corner shop, rarely. FAST. 'Sheart, what a damn'd witty rogue's this! How he confounds with his similes! CAR. Better with similes than smiles:... Plays - Post by : Allnewe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 580

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 1 - Scene 1 Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 1 - Scene 1

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 1 - Scene 1
ACT I - SCENE ISCENE I. -- The Country. (ENTER MACILENTE, WITH A BOOK.) MACI. "Viri est, fortunae caecitatem facile ferre."'Tis true; but, Stoic , in the vast world,Doth that man breathe, that can so much commandHis blood and his affection? Well, I seeI strive in vain to cure my wounded soul;For every cordial that my thoughts applyTurns to a corsive and doth eat it farther.There is no taste in this philosophy;'Tis like a potion that a man should drink,But turns his stomach with the sight of it.I am no such pill'd Cynick to believe,That beggary... Plays - Post by : Allnewe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 3128

The Poetaster; Or, His Arraignment - Glossary The Poetaster; Or, His Arraignment - Glossary

The Poetaster; Or, His Arraignment - Glossary
ABATE, cast down, subdue. ABHORRING, repugnant (to), at variance. ABJECT, base, degraded thing, outcast. ABRASE, smooth, blank. ABSOLUTE(LY), faultless(ly). ABSTRACTED, abstract, abstruse. ABUSE, deceive, insult, dishonour, make ill use of. ACATER, caterer. ACATES, cates. ACCEPTIVE, willing, ready to accept, receive. ACCOMMODATE, fit, befitting. (The word was a fashionable one and used on all occasions. See "Henry IV.," pt. 2, iii. 4). ACCOST, draw near, approach. ACKNOWN, confessedly acquainted with. ACME, full maturity. ADALANTADO, lord deputy or governor of a Spanish province. ADJECTION, addition. ADMIRATION, astonishment. ADMIRE, wonder, wonder at. ADROP, philosopher's stone, or substance from which obtained. ADSCRIVE, subscribe.... Plays - Post by : Morningwing - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 2207

The Poetaster; Or, His Arraignment - Act 5 - Scene 1 The Poetaster; Or, His Arraignment - Act 5 - Scene 1

The Poetaster; Or, His Arraignment - Act 5 - Scene 1
ACT V - SCENE IACT V SCENE I.-An Apartment in the Palace. (Enter CAESAR, MECAENAS, GALLUS, TIBULLUS, HORACE, and Equites Romani.) Caes. We, that have conquer'd still, to save the conquer'd, And loved to make inflictions fear'd, not felt; Grieved to reprove, and joyful to reward; More proud of reconcilement than revenge; Resume into the late state of our love, Worthy Cornelius Gallus, and Tibullus: You both are gentlemen: and, you,... Plays - Post by : Morningwing - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 1319