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An Outback Marriage - Chapter 9. Some Visitors An Outback Marriage - Chapter 9. Some Visitors

An Outback Marriage - Chapter 9. Some Visitors
CHAPTER IX. SOME VISITORSAfter breakfast next morning Mary decided to spend the day in the company of the children, who were having holidays."Just as well for you to learn the house firsts" said Hugh, "before you tackle the property. The youngsters know where everything is--within four miles, anyhow."Two little girls were impressed, and were told to take Miss Grant round and show her the way about the place; and they set off together in the bright morning sunlight, on a trip of exploration.Now, no true Australian, young or old, ever takes any trouble or undergoes any exertion or goes anywhere without... Long Stories - Post by : maltiti - Date : May 2012 - Author : Banjo Paterson - Read : 3276

An Outback Marriage - Chapter 8. At The Homestead An Outback Marriage - Chapter 8. At The Homestead

An Outback Marriage - Chapter 8. At The Homestead
CHAPTER VIII. AT THE HOMESTEADMiss Grant's arrival at Kuryong homestead caused great excitement among the inhabitants. Mrs. Gordon received her in a motherly way, trying hard not to feel that a new mistress had come into the house; she was anxious to see whether the girl exhibited any signs of her father's fiery temper and imperious disposition. The two servant-girls at the homestead--great herculean, good-natured bush-girls, daughters of a boundary-rider, whose highest ideal of style and refinement was Kuryong drawing-room--breathed hard and stared round-eyed, like wild fillies, at the unconscious intruder. The station-hands--Joe, the wood-and-water boy, old Alfred the groom, Bill... Long Stories - Post by : aidis - Date : May 2012 - Author : Banjo Paterson - Read : 3558

An Outback Marriage - Chapter 7. Mr. Blake's Relations An Outback Marriage - Chapter 7. Mr. Blake's Relations

An Outback Marriage - Chapter 7. Mr. Blake's Relations
CHAPTER VII. MR. BLAKE'S RELATIONSAs soon as Hugh got his team swinging along at a steady ten miles an hour on the mountain road, Mary Grant opened the conversation."Mr. Gordon," she said, "who is Mr. Blake?""He's the lawyer from Tarrong.""Yes, I know. Mrs. Connellan called him the 'lier.' But I thought you didn't seem to like him. Isn't he nice?""I suppose so. His father was a gentleman--the police magistrate up here.""Then, why don't you like him? Is there anything wrong about him?"Hugh straightened his leaders and steadied the vehicle over a little gully."There's nothing wrong about him," he said, "only--his mother... Long Stories - Post by : Pallieter - Date : May 2012 - Author : Banjo Paterson - Read : 3768

An Outback Marriage - Chapter 6. A Coach Accident An Outback Marriage - Chapter 6. A Coach Accident

An Outback Marriage - Chapter 6. A Coach Accident
CHAPTER VI. A COACH ACCIDENTThe coach from Tarrong railway station to Emu Flat, and then on to Donohoe's Hotel, ran twice a week. Pat Donohoe was mailman, contractor and driver, and his admirers said that Pat could hit his five horses in more places at once than any other man on the face of the earth. His coach was horsed by the neighbouring squatters, through whose stations the road ran; and any horse that developed homicidal tendencies, or exhibited a disinclination to work, was at once handed over to the mailman to be licked into shape. The result was that, as... Long Stories - Post by : ronrosser - Date : May 2012 - Author : Banjo Paterson - Read : 1619

An Outback Marriage - Chapter 5. The Coming Of The Heiress An Outback Marriage - Chapter 5. The Coming Of The Heiress

An Outback Marriage - Chapter 5. The Coming Of The Heiress
CHAPTER V. THE COMING OF THE HEIRESSThe spring--the glorious hill-country spring--was down on Kuryong. All the flats along Kiley's River were knee-deep in green grass. The wattle-trees were out in golden bloom, and the snow-water from the mountains set the river running white with foam, fighting its way over bars of granite into big pools where the platypus dived, and the wild ducks--busy with the cares of nesting--just settled occasionally to snatch a hasty meal and then hurried off, with a whistle of strong wings, back to their little ones. The breeze brought down from the hills a scent of grass... Long Stories - Post by : kaprice - Date : May 2012 - Author : Banjo Paterson - Read : 3436

An Outback Marriage - Chapter 4. The Old Station An Outback Marriage - Chapter 4. The Old Station

An Outback Marriage - Chapter 4. The Old Station
CHAPTER IV. THE OLD STATIONThere are few countries in the world with such varieties of climate as Australia, and though some stations are out in the great, red-hot, frying wastes of the Never-Never, others are up in the hills where a hot night is a thing unknown snow falls occasionally, and where it is no uncommon thing to spend a summer's evening by the side of a roaring fire. In the matter of improvements, too, stations vary greatly. Some are in a wilderness, with fittings to match; others have telephones between homestead and out-stations, the jackeroos dress for dinner, and... Long Stories - Post by : salescopypro - Date : May 2012 - Author : Banjo Paterson - Read : 3480

An Outback Marriage - Chapter 3. In Push Society An Outback Marriage - Chapter 3. In Push Society

An Outback Marriage - Chapter 3. In Push Society
CHAPTER III. IN PUSH SOCIETYThe passing of the evening afterwards is the only true test of a dinner's success. Many a good dinner, enlivened with wine and made brilliant with repartee, has died out in gloom. The guests have all said their best things during the meal, and nothing is left but to smoke moodily and look at the clock. Our heroes were not of that mettle. They meant to have some sort of fun, and the various amusements of Sydney were canvassed. It was unanimously voted too hot for the theatres, ditto for billiards. There were no supporters for a... Long Stories - Post by : tgranum - Date : May 2012 - Author : Banjo Paterson - Read : 3103

An Outback Marriage - Chapter 2. A Dinner For Five An Outback Marriage - Chapter 2. A Dinner For Five

An Outback Marriage - Chapter 2. A Dinner For Five
CHAPTER II. A DINNER FOR FIVEA club dining-room in Australia is much like one in any other part of the world. Even at the Antipodes--though the seasons are reversed, and the foxes have wings--we still shun the club bore, and let him have a table to himself; the head waiter usually looks a more important personage than any of the members or guests; and men may be seen giving each other dinners from much the same ignoble motives as those which actuate their fellows elsewhere. In the Cassowary Club, on the night of which we tell, the Bo'sun was giving his... Long Stories - Post by : Joanne_L._Mason - Date : May 2012 - Author : Banjo Paterson - Read : 2334

An Outback Marriage - Chapter 1. In The Club An Outback Marriage - Chapter 1. In The Club

An Outback Marriage - Chapter 1. In The Club
CHAPTER I. IN THE CLUBIt was a summer's evening in Sydney, and the north-east wind that comes down from New Guinea and the tropical islands over leagues of warm sea, brought on its wings a heavy depressing moisture. In the streets people walked listlessly, perspired, mopped themselves, and abused their much-vaunted climate. Everyone who could manage it was out of town, either on the heights of Moss Vale or the Blue Mountains, escaping from the Inferno of Sydney.In the Cassowary Club, weary, pallid waiters brought iced drinks to such of the members as were condemned to spend the summer in town.... Long Stories - Post by : gem2015 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Banjo Paterson - Read : 1645

Sunrise On The Coast Sunrise On The Coast

Sunrise On The Coast
Grey dawn on the sand-hills--the night wind has drifted All night from the rollers a scent of the sea; With the dawn the grey fog his battalions has lifted, At the call of the morning they scatter and flee. Like mariners calling the roll of their number The sea-fowl put out to the infinite deep. And far over-head--sinking softly to slumber-- Worn out by their watching, the stars fall asleep. To eastward resteth the dome of the skies on The sea-line, stirs softly the curtain of night; And far from behind the enshrouded horizon Comes the voice of a God... Poems - Post by : laketahoeusa - Date : January 2011 - Author : Banjo Paterson - Read : 3763

The Angel's Kiss The Angel's Kiss

The Angel's Kiss
An angel stood beside the bed Where lay the living and the dead. He gave the mother--her who died-- A kiss that Christ the Crucified Had sent to greet the weary soul When, worn and faint, it reached its goal. He gave the infant kisses twain, One on the breast, one on the brain. "Go forth into the world," he said, "With blessings on your heart and head, "For God, who ruleth righteously, Hath ordered that to such as be "From birth deprived of mother's love, I bring His blessing from above; "But if the mother's life He spare Then she... Poems - Post by : shark - Date : January 2011 - Author : Banjo Paterson - Read : 1687

The Maori's Wool The Maori's Wool

The Maori's Wool
_Now, this is just a simple tale to tell the reader how They civilised the Maori tribe at Rooti-iti-au._ . . . . . The Maoris are a mighty race--the finest ever known; Before the missionaries came they worshipped wood and stone; They went to war and fought like fiends, and when the war was done They pacified their conquered foes by eating every one. But now-a-days about the pahs in idleness they lurk, Prepared to smoke or drink or talk--or anything but work. The richest tribe in all the North in sheep and horse and cow Were those who led... Poems - Post by : bunni - Date : January 2011 - Author : Banjo Paterson - Read : 2281

Tommy Corrigan Tommy Corrigan

Tommy Corrigan
(Killed, Steeplechasing at Flemington.) You talk of riders on the flat, of nerve and pluck and pace, Not one in fifty has the nerve to ride a steeplechase. It's right enough while horses pull and take their fences strong, To rush a flier to the front and bring the field along; But what about the last half-mile, with horses blown and beat-- When every jump means all you know to keep him on his feet? When any slip means sudden death--with wife and child to keep-- It needs some nerve to draw the whip and flog him at the leap-- But... Poems - Post by : Joseph_Guy - Date : January 2011 - Author : Banjo Paterson - Read : 1794

A Ballad Of Ducks A Ballad Of Ducks

A Ballad Of Ducks
The railway rattled and roared and swung With jolting carriage and bumping trucks. The sun, like a billiard red ball, hung In the Western sky: and the tireless tongue Of the wild-eyed man in the corner told This terrible tale of the days of old, And the party that ought to have kept the ducks. "Well, it ain't all joy bein' on the land With an overdraft that'd knock you flat; And the rabbits have pretty well took command; But the hardest thing for a man to stand Is the feller who says 'Well, I told you so! You should ha'... Poems - Post by : Teamplay1 - Date : January 2011 - Author : Banjo Paterson - Read : 2977

An Evening In Dandaloo An Evening In Dandaloo

An Evening In Dandaloo
It was while we held our races-- Hurdles, sprints and steeplechases-- Up in Dandaloo, That a crowd of Sydney stealers, Jockeys, pugilists and spielers Brought some horses, real heelers, Came and put us through. Beat our nags and won our money, Made the game by no means funny, Made us rather blue; When the racing was concluded, Of our hard-earned coin denuded Dandaloonies sat and brooded There in Dandaloo. . . . . . Night came down on Johnson's shanty Where the grog was no means scanty, And a tumult grew Till some wild, excited person Galloped down the township cursing,... Poems - Post by : howel - Date : January 2011 - Author : Banjo Paterson - Read : 2096

Not On It Not On It

Not On It
The new chum's polo pony was the smartest pony yet-- The owner backed it for the Cup for all that he could get. The books were laying fives to one, in tenners; and you bet He was on it. The bell was rung, the nags came out their quality to try, The band played "What Ho! Robbo!" as our hero cantered by, The people in the Leger Stand cried out, "Hi, Mister, Hi! Are you on it?" They watched him as the flag went down; his fate is quickly told-- The pony gave a sudden spring, and off the rider rolled.... Poems - Post by : Roger - Date : January 2011 - Author : Banjo Paterson - Read : 3014

The Pannikin Poet The Pannikin Poet

The Pannikin Poet
There's nothing here sublime, But just a roving rhyme, Run off to pass the time, With nought titanic in The theme that it supports, And, though it treats of quarts, It's bare of golden thoughts-- It's just a pannikin. I think it's rather hard That each Australian bard-- Each wan, poetic card-- With thoughts galvanic in His fiery soul alight, In wild aerial flight, Will sit him down and write About a pannikin. He makes some new-chum fare From out his English lair To hunt the native bear, That curious mannikin; And then when times get bad That wandering English lad... Poems - Post by : Carmen_Maranon - Date : January 2011 - Author : Banjo Paterson - Read : 3135

The Mylora Elopement The Mylora Elopement

The Mylora Elopement
By the winding Wollondilly where the weeping willows weep, And the shepherd, with his billy, half awake and half asleep, Folds his fleecy flocks that linger homewards in the setting sun, Lived my hero, Jim the Ringer, "cocky" on Mylora Run. Jimmy loved the super's daughter, Miss Amelia Jane McGrath. Long and earnestly he sought her, but he feared her stern papa; And Amelia loved him truly--but the course of love, if true, Never yet ran smooth or duly, as I think it ought to do. Watching with his slow affection once Jim saw McGrath the boss Riding out by Jim's... Poems - Post by : jeffk - Date : January 2011 - Author : Banjo Paterson - Read : 2328

When Dacey Rode The Mule When Dacey Rode The Mule

When Dacey Rode The Mule
'Twas to a small, up-country town, When we were boys at school, There came a circus with a clown, Likewise a bucking mule. The clown announced a scheme they had Spectators for to bring-- They'd give a crown to any lad Who'd ride him round the ring. And, gentle reader, do not scoff Nor think a man a fool-- To buck a porous-plaster off Was pastime to that mule. The boys got on; he bucked like sin; He threw them in the dirt, What time the clown would raise a grin By asking, "Are you hurt?" But Johnny Dacey came one... Poems - Post by : sbeard - Date : January 2011 - Author : Banjo Paterson - Read : 2914

The Corner Man The Corner Man

The Corner Man
I dreamed a dream at the midnight deep, When fancies come and go To vex a man in his soothing sleep With thoughts of awful woe-- I dreamed that I was a corner-man Of a nigger minstrel show. I cracked my jokes, and the building rang With laughter loud and long; I hushed the house as I softly sang An old plantation song-- A tale of the wicked slavery days Of cruelty and wrong. A small boy sat on the foremost seat-- A mirthful youngster he; He beat the time with his restless feet To each new melody, And he picked... Poems - Post by : websmar2 - Date : January 2011 - Author : Banjo Paterson - Read : 2837