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A Paradox On Art A Paradox On Art

A Paradox On Art
Is it not part of the pedantry of letters to limit the word art, a little narrowly, to certain manifestations of the artistic spirit, or, at all events, to set up a comparative estimate of the values of the several arts, a little unnecessarily? Literature, painting, sculpture, music, these we admit as art, and the persons who work in them as artists; but dancing, for instance, in which the performer is at once creator and interpreter, and those methods of interpretation, such as the playing of musical instruments, or the conducting of an orchestra, or acting, have we scrupulously considered the... Essays - Post by : bawarrior - Date : November 2011 - Author : Arthur Symons - Read : 3384

Notes On Wagner At Bayreuth Notes On Wagner At Bayreuth

Notes On Wagner At Bayreuth
I. BAYREUTH AND MUNICH Bayreuth is Wagner's creation in the world of action, as the music-dramas are his creation in the world of art; and it is a triumph not less decisive, in its transposition of dream into reality. Remember that every artist, in every art, has desired his own Bayreuth, and that only Wagner has attained it. Who would not rather remain at home, receiving the world, than go knocking, humbly or arrogantly, at many doors, offering an entertainment, perhaps unwelcome? The artist must always be at cautious enmity with his public, always somewhat at its mercy, even after he... Essays - Post by : HRDoubleU - Date : November 2011 - Author : Arthur Symons - Read : 3211

Mozart In The Mirabell-garten Mozart In The Mirabell-garten

Mozart In The Mirabell-garten
They are giving a cycle of Mozart operas at Munich, at the Hof-Theater, to follow the Wagner operas at the Prinz-Regenten-Theatre; and I stayed, on my way to Salzburg, to hear "Die Zauberflöte." It was perfectly given, with a small, choice orchestra under Herr Zumpe, and with every part except the tenor's admirably sung and acted. Herr Julius Zarest, from Hanover, was particularly good as Papageno; the Eva of "Die Meistersinger" made an equally good Pamina. And it was staged under Herr von Possart's direction, as suitably and as successfully, in its different way, as the Wagner opera had been. The... Essays - Post by : bluegirl - Date : November 2011 - Author : Arthur Symons - Read : 939

The Meiningen Orchestra The Meiningen Orchestra

The Meiningen Orchestra
Other orchestras give performances, readings, approximations; the Meiningen orchestra gives an interpretation, that is, the thing itself. When this orchestra plays a piece of music every note lives, and not, as with most orchestras, every particularly significant note. Brahms is sometimes dull, but he is never dull when these people play him; Schubert is sometimes tame, but not when they play him. What they do is precisely to put vitality into even those parts of a composition in which it is scarcely present, or scarcely realisable; and that is a much more difficult thing, and really a more important thing, for... Essays - Post by : HRDoubleU - Date : November 2011 - Author : Arthur Symons - Read : 2615

The Dramatisation Of Song The Dramatisation Of Song

The Dramatisation Of Song
All art is a compromise, in which the choice of what is to be foregone must be left somewhat to the discretion of nature. When the sculptor foregoes colour, when the painter foregoes relief, when the poet foregoes the music which soars beyond words and the musician that precise meaning which lies in words alone, he follows a kind of necessity in things, and the compromise seems to be ready-made for him. But there will always be those who are discontented with no matter what fixed limits, who dream, like Wagner, of a possible, or, like Mallarmé, of an impossible, fusion... Essays - Post by : Jimntac - Date : November 2011 - Author : Arthur Symons - Read : 841

A Reflection At A Dolmetsch Concert A Reflection At A Dolmetsch Concert

A Reflection At A Dolmetsch Concert
The interpreter of ancient music, Arnold Dolmetsch, is one of those rare magicians who are able to make roses blossom in mid-winter. While music has been modernising itself until the piano becomes an orchestra, and Berlioz requires four orchestras to obtain a pianissimo, this strange man of genius has quietly gone back a few centuries and discovered for himself an exquisite lost world, which was disappearing like a fresco peeling off a wall. He has burrowed in libraries and found unknown manuscripts like a savant, he has worked at misunderstood notations and found out a way of reading them like a... Essays - Post by : sdhite - Date : November 2011 - Author : Arthur Symons - Read : 1004

Paderewski Paderewski

Paderewski
I shall never cease to associate Paderewski with the night of the Jubilee. I had gone on foot from the Temple through those packed, gaudy, noisy, and vulgarised streets, through which no vehicles could pass, to a rare and fantastic house at the other end of London, a famous house hospitable to all the arts; and Paderewski sat with closed eyes and played the piano, there in his friend's house, as if he were in his own home. After the music was over, someone said to me, "I feel as if I had been in hell," so profound was the emotion... Essays - Post by : jonar - Date : November 2011 - Author : Arthur Symons - Read : 831

Pachmann And The Piano Pachmann And The Piano

Pachmann And The Piano
I It seems to me that Pachmann is the only pianist who plays the piano as it ought to be played. I admit his limitations, I admit that he can play only certain things, but I contend that he is the greatest living pianist because he can play those things better than any other pianist can play anything. Pachmann is the Verlaine of pianists, and when I hear him I think of Verlaine reading his own verse, in a faint, reluctant voice, which you overheard. Other players have mastered the piano, Pachmann absorbs its soul, and it is only when he... Essays - Post by : future - Date : November 2011 - Author : Arthur Symons - Read : 796

Technique And The Artist Technique And The Artist

Technique And The Artist
Technique and the artist: that is a question, of interest to the student of every art, which was brought home to me with unusual emphasis the other afternoon, as I sat in the Queen's Hall, and listened to Ysaye and Busoni. Are we always quite certain what we mean when we speak of an artist? Have we quite realised in our own minds the extent to which technique must go to the making of an artist, and the point at which something else must be superadded? That is a matter which I often doubt, and the old doubt came back to... Essays - Post by : GARY_THOMAS - Date : November 2011 - Author : Arthur Symons - Read : 2208

On Writing About Music On Writing About Music

On Writing About Music
The reason why music is so much more difficult to write about than any other art, is because music is the one absolutely disembodied art, when it is heard, and no more than a proposition of Euclid, when it is written. It is wholly useless, to the student no less than to the general reader, to write about music in the style of the programmes for which we pay sixpence at the concerts. "Repeated by flute and oboe, with accompaniment for clarionet (in triplets) and strings pizzicato, and then worked up by the full orchestra, this melody is eventually allotted to... Essays - Post by : duchesseva - Date : November 2011 - Author : Arthur Symons - Read : 2764

The Sicilian Actors The Sicilian Actors

The Sicilian Actors
I I have been seeing the Sicilian actors in London. They came here from Paris , I read, "la passion paraît décidement," to a dramatic critic, "avoir partout ses inconvenients," especially on the stage. We are supposed to think so here, but for once London has applauded an acting which is more primitively passionate than anything we are accustomed to on our moderate stage. Some of it was spoken in Italian, some in the Sicilian dialect, and not many in the English part of the audience could follow very closely the words as they were spoken. Yet so marvellously real were... Essays - Post by : trixia - Date : November 2011 - Author : Arthur Symons - Read : 1516

A Theory Of The Stage A Theory Of The Stage

A Theory Of The Stage
Life and beauty are the body and soul of great drama. Mix the two as you will, so long as both are there, resolved into a single substance. But let there be, in the making, two ingredients, and while one is poetry, and comes bringing beauty, the other is a violent thing which has been scornfully called melodrama, and is the emphasis of action. The greatest plays are melodrama by their skeleton, and poetry by the flesh which clothes that skeleton. The foundation of drama is that part of the action which can be represented in dumb show. Only the essential... Essays - Post by : riker - Date : November 2011 - Author : Arthur Symons - Read : 1259

Great Acting In English Great Acting In English

Great Acting In English
Why is it that we have at the present moment no great acting in England? We can remember it in our own time, in Irving, who was a man of individual genius. In him it was the expression of a romantic temperament, really Cornish, that is, Celtic, which had been cultivated like a rare plant, in a hothouse. Irving was an incomparable orchid, a thing beautiful, lonely, and not quite normal. We have one actress now living, an exception to every rule, in whom a rare and wandering genius comes and goes: I mean, of course, Mrs. Patrick Campbell. She enchants... Essays - Post by : marketingtest - Date : November 2011 - Author : Arthur Symons - Read : 2777

The Speaking Of Verse The Speaking Of Verse

The Speaking Of Verse
Was there ever at any time an art, an acquired method, of speaking verse, as definite as the art and method of singing it? The Greeks, it has often been thought, had such a method, but we are still puzzling in vain over their choruses, and wondering how far they were sung, how far they were spoken. Wagner pointed out the probability that these choruses were written to fixed tunes, perhaps themselves the accompaniment to dances, because it can hardly be believed that poems of so meditative a kind could have themselves given rise to such elaborate and not apparently expressive... Essays - Post by : Jack_Bastide - Date : November 2011 - Author : Arthur Symons - Read : 3382

On Crossing Stage To Right On Crossing Stage To Right

On Crossing Stage To Right
If you look into the actors' prompt-books, the most frequent direction which you will find is this: "Cross stage to right." It is not a mere direction, it is a formula; it is not a formula only, but a universal remedy. Whenever the action seems to flag, or the dialogue to become weak or wordy, you must "cross stage to right"; no matter what is wrong with the play, this will set it right. We have heard so much of the "action" of a play, that the stage-manager in England seems to imagine that dramatic action is literally a movement of... Essays - Post by : phenz - Date : November 2011 - Author : Arthur Symons - Read : 2041

The Price Of Realism The Price Of Realism

The Price Of Realism
Modern staging, which has been carried in England to its highest point of excellence, professes to aim at beauty, and is, indeed, often beautiful in detail. But its real aim is not at the creation of beautiful pictures, in subordination to the words and actions of the play, but at supplementing words and actions by an exact imitation of real surroundings. Imitation, not creation, is its end, and in its attempt to imitate the general aspect of things it leads the way to the substitution of things themselves for perfectly satisfactory indications of them. "Real water" we have all heard of,... Essays - Post by : Leo2770 - Date : November 2011 - Author : Arthur Symons - Read : 3301

The Test Of The Actor The Test Of The Actor

The Test Of The Actor
The interest of bad plays lies in the test which they afford of the capability of the actor. To what extent, however, can an actor really carry through a play which has not even the merits of its defects, such a play, for instance, as Mr. Henry Arthur Jones has produced in "The Princess's Nose"? Mr. Jones has sometimes been mistaken for a man of letters, as by a distinguished dramatic critic, who, writing a complimentary preface, has said: "The claim of Mr. Henry Arthur Jones's more ambitious plays to rank as literature may have been in some cases grudgingly allowed,... Essays - Post by : Cy_Price - Date : November 2011 - Author : Arthur Symons - Read : 1246

A Play And The Public A Play And The Public

A Play And The Public
John Oliver Hobbes, Mrs. Craigie, once wrote a play called "The Bishop's Move," which was an attempt to do artistically what so many writers for the stage have done without thinking about art at all. She gave us good writing instead of bad, delicate worldly wisdom instead of vague sentiment or vague cynicism, and the manners of society instead of an imitation of some remote imitation of those manners. The play is a comedy, and the situations are not allowed to get beyond the control of good manners. The game is after all the thing, and the skill of the game.... Essays - Post by : baldeggs - Date : November 2011 - Author : Arthur Symons - Read : 2571

The Question Of Censorship The Question Of Censorship

The Question Of Censorship
The letter of protest which appeared in the Times of June 30, 1903, signed by Mr. Swinburne, Mr. Meredith, and Mr. Hardy, the three highest names in contemporary English literature, will, I hope, have done something to save the literary reputation of England from such a fate as one eminent dramatic critic sees in store for it. "Once more," says the Athenæum, "the caprice of our censure brings contempt upon us, and makes, or should make, us the laughing-stock of Europe." The Morning Post is more lenient, and is "sincerely sorry for the unfortunate censor," because "he has immortalised himself by... Essays - Post by : hartman - Date : November 2011 - Author : Arthur Symons - Read : 1385

'monna, Vanna' "monna, Vanna"

'monna, Vanna'
In his earlier plays Maeterlinck invented a world of his own, which was a sort of projection into space of the world of nursery legends and of childish romances. It was at once very abstract and very local. There was a castle by the sea, a "well at the world's end," a pool in a forest; princesses with names out of the "Morte d'Arthur" lost crowns of gold; and blind beggars without a name wandered in the darkness of eternal terror. Death was always the scene-shifter of the play, and destiny the stage-manager. The people who came and went had the... Essays - Post by : dhouse - Date : November 2011 - Author : Arthur Symons - Read : 696