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Great Boer War - Chapter 39. The End Great Boer War - Chapter 39. The End

Great Boer War - Chapter 39. The End
It only remains in one short chapter to narrate the progress of the peace negotiations, the ultimate settlement, and the final consequences of this long-drawn war. However disheartening the successive incidents may have been in which the Boers were able to inflict heavy losses upon us and to renew their supplies of arms and ammunition, it was none the less certain that their numbers were waning and that the inevitable end was steadily approaching. With mathematical precision the scientific soldier in Pretoria, with his web of barbed wire radiating out over the whole country, was week by week wearing them steadily... Nonfictions - Post by : bohlken - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur Conan Doyle - Read : 1993

Great Boer War - Chapter 38. De La Rey's Campaign Of 1902 Great Boer War - Chapter 38. De La Rey's Campaign Of 1902

Great Boer War - Chapter 38. De La Rey's Campaign Of 1902
IT will be remembered that at the close of 1901 Lord Methuen and Colonel Kekewich had both come across to the eastern side of their district and made their base at the railway line in the Klerksdorp section. Their position was strengthened by the fact that a blockhouse cordon now ran from Klerksdorp to Ventersdorp, and from Ventersdorp to Potchefstroom, so that this triangle could be effectively controlled. There remained, however, a huge tract of difficult country which was practically in the occupation of the enemy. Several thousand stalwarts were known to be riding with De la Rey and his energetic... Nonfictions - Post by : bohlken - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur Conan Doyle - Read : 2636

Great Boer War - Chapter 37. The Campaign Of January To April, 1902 Great Boer War - Chapter 37. The Campaign Of January To April, 1902

Great Boer War - Chapter 37. The Campaign Of January To April, 1902
At the opening of the year 1902 it was evident to every observer that the Boer resistance, spirited as it was, must be nearing its close. By a long succession of captures their forces were much reduced in numbers. They were isolated from the world, and had no means save precarious smuggling of renewing their supplies of ammunition. It was known also that their mobility, which had been their great strength, was decreasing, and that in spite of their admirable horsemastership their supply of remounts was becoming exhausted. An increasing number of the burghers were volunteering for service against their own... Nonfictions - Post by : bohlken - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur Conan Doyle - Read : 2212

Great Boer War - Chapter 36. The Spring Campaign (September To December, 1901) Great Boer War - Chapter 36. The Spring Campaign (September To December, 1901)

Great Boer War - Chapter 36. The Spring Campaign (September To December, 1901)
The history of the war during the African winter of 1901 has now been sketched, and some account given of the course of events in the Transvaal, the Orange River Colony, and the Cape Colony. The hope of the British that they might stamp out resistance before the grass should restore mobility to the larger bodies of Boers was destined to be disappointed. By the middle of September the veld had turned from drab to green, and the great drama was fated to last for one more act, however anxious all the British and the majority of the Boers might be... Nonfictions - Post by : bohlken - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur Conan Doyle - Read : 3434

Great Boer War - Chapter 32. The Second Invasion Of Cape Colony Great Boer War - Chapter 32. The Second Invasion Of Cape Colony

Great Boer War - Chapter 32. The Second Invasion Of Cape Colony
(DECEMBER 1900 TO APRIL 1901.) During the whole war the task of the British had been made very much more difficult by the openly expressed sympathy with the Boers from the political association known as the Afrikander Bond, which either inspired or represented the views which prevailed among the great majority of the Dutch inhabitants of Cape Colony. How strong was this rebel impulse may be gauged by the fact that in some of the border districts no less than ninety per cent of the voters joined the Boer invaders upon the occasion of their first entrance into the Colony. It... Nonfictions - Post by : bohlken - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur Conan Doyle - Read : 1457

Great Boer War - Chapter 31. The Guerilla Warfare In The Transvaal: Nooitgedacht Great Boer War - Chapter 31. The Guerilla Warfare In The Transvaal: Nooitgedacht

Great Boer War - Chapter 31. The Guerilla Warfare In The Transvaal: Nooitgedacht
Leaving De Wet in the Ficksburg mountains he lurked until after the opening of the New Year, the story of the scattered operations in the Transvaal may now be carried down to the same point--a story comprising many skirmishes and one considerable engagement, but so devoid of any central thread that it is difficult to know how to approach it. From Lichtenburg to Komati, a distance of four hundred miles, there was sporadic warfare everywhere, attacks upon scattered posts, usually beaten off but occasionally successful, attacks upon convoys, attacks upon railway trains, attacks upon anything and everything which could harass... Nonfictions - Post by : Donwhale - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur Conan Doyle - Read : 2202

Great Boer War - Chapter 30. The Campaign Of De Wet Great Boer War - Chapter 30. The Campaign Of De Wet

Great Boer War - Chapter 30. The Campaign Of De Wet
It had been hoped that the dispersal of the main Boer army, the capture of its guns and the expulsion of many both of the burghers and of the foreign mercenaries, would have marked the end of the war. These expectations were, however, disappointed, and South Africa was destined to be afflicted and the British Empire disturbed by a useless guerilla campaign. After the great and dramatic events which characterised the earlier phases of the struggle between the Briton and the Boer for the mastery of South Africa it is somewhat of the nature of an anticlimax to turn one's attention... Nonfictions - Post by : Donwhale - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur Conan Doyle - Read : 1735

Great Boer War - Chapter 29. The Advance To Komatipoort Great Boer War - Chapter 29. The Advance To Komatipoort

Great Boer War - Chapter 29. The Advance To Komatipoort
The time had now come for the great combined movement which was to sweep the main Boer army off the line of the Delagoa railway, cut its source of supplies, and follow it into that remote and mountainous Lydenburg district which had always been proclaimed as the last refuge of the burghers. Before entering upon this most difficult of all his advances Lord Roberts waited until the cavalry and mounted infantry were well mounted again. Then, when all was ready, the first step in this last stage of the regular campaign was taken by General Buller, who moved his army of... Nonfictions - Post by : Donwhale - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur Conan Doyle - Read : 2336

Great Boer War - Chapter 28. The Halt At Pretoria Great Boer War - Chapter 28. The Halt At Pretoria

Great Boer War - Chapter 28. The Halt At Pretoria
Lord Roberts had now been six weeks in the capital, and British troops had overrun the greater part of the south and west of the Transvaal, but in spite of this there was continued Boer resistance, which flared suddenly up in places which had been nominally pacified and disarmed. It was found, as has often been shown in history, that it is easier to defeat a republican army than to conquer it. From Klerksdorp, from Ventersdorp, from Rustenburg, came news of risings against the newly imposed British authority. The concealed Mauser and the bandolier were dug up once more from the... Nonfictions - Post by : Donwhale - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur Conan Doyle - Read : 1572

Great Boer War - Chapter 27. The Lines Of Communication Great Boer War - Chapter 27. The Lines Of Communication

Great Boer War - Chapter 27. The Lines Of Communication
Christian de Wet, the elder of two brothers of that name, was at this time in the prime of life, a little over forty years of age. He was a burly middle-sized bearded man, poorly educated, but endowed with much energy and common-sense. His military experience dated back to Majuba Hill, and he had a large share of that curious race hatred which is intelligible in the case of the Transvaal, but inexplicable in a Freestater who has received no injury from the British Empire. Some weakness of his sight compels the use of tinted spectacles, and he had now turned... Nonfictions - Post by : Donwhale - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur Conan Doyle - Read : 2153

Great Boer War - Chapter 26. Diamond Hill--Rundle's Operations Great Boer War - Chapter 26. Diamond Hill--Rundle's Operations

Great Boer War - Chapter 26. Diamond Hill--Rundle's Operations
The military situation at the time of the occupation of Pretoria was roughly as follows. Lord Roberts with some thirty thousand men was in possession of the capital, but had left his long line of communications very imperfectly guarded behind him. On the flank of this line of communications, in the eastern and north-eastern corner of the Free State, was an energetic force of unconquered Freestaters who had rallied round President Steyn. They were some eight or ten thousand in number, well horsed, with a fair number of guns, under the able leadership of De Wet, Prinsloo, and Olivier. Above all,... Nonfictions - Post by : Donwhale - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur Conan Doyle - Read : 1583

Great Boer War - Chapter 22. The Halt At Bloemfontein. Great Boer War - Chapter 22. The Halt At Bloemfontein.

Great Boer War - Chapter 22. The Halt At Bloemfontein.
On March 13th Lord Roberts occupied the capital of the Orange Free State. On May 1st, more than six weeks later, the advance was resumed. This long delay was absolutely necessary in order to supply the place of the ten thousand horses and mules which are said to have been used up in the severe work of the preceding month. It was not merely that a large number of the cavalry chargers had died or been abandoned, but it was that of those which remained the majority were in a state which made them useless for immediate service. How far this... Nonfictions - Post by : Donwhale - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur Conan Doyle - Read : 3546

Great Boer War - Chapter 21. Strategic Effects Of Lord Roberts's March Great Boer War - Chapter 21. Strategic Effects Of Lord Roberts's March

Great Boer War - Chapter 21. Strategic Effects Of Lord Roberts's March
From the moment that Lord Roberts with his army advanced from Ramdam all the other British forces in South Africa, the Colesberg force, the Stormberg force, Brabant's force, and the Natal force, had the pressure relieved in front of them, a tendency which increased with every fresh success of the main body. A short chapter must be devoted to following rapidly the fortunes of these various armies, and tracing the effect of Lord Roberts's strategy upon their movements. They may be taken in turn from west to east. The force under General Clements (formerly French's) had, as has already been told,... Nonfictions - Post by : Donwhale - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur Conan Doyle - Read : 1562

Great Boer War - Chapter 20. Roberts's Advance On Bloemfontein Great Boer War - Chapter 20. Roberts's Advance On Bloemfontein

Great Boer War - Chapter 20. Roberts's Advance On Bloemfontein
The surrender of Cronje had taken place on February 27th, obliterating for ever the triumphant memories which the Boers had for twenty years associated with that date. A halt was necessary to provide food for the hungry troops, and above all to enable the cavalry horses to pick up. The supply of forage had been most inadequate, and the beasts had not yet learned to find a living from the dry withered herbage of the veld. (Footnote: A battery which turned out its horses to graze found that the puzzled creatures simply galloped about the plain, and could only be reassembled... Nonfictions - Post by : Donwhale - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur Conan Doyle - Read : 2625

Great Boer War - Chapter 19. Paardeberg Great Boer War - Chapter 19. Paardeberg

Great Boer War - Chapter 19. Paardeberg
Lord Roberts's operations, prepared with admirable secrecy and carried out with extreme energy, aimed at two different results, each of which he was fortunate enough to attain. The first was that an overpowering force of cavalry should ride round the Boer position and raise the siege of Kimberley: the fate of this expedition has already been described. The second was that the infantry, following hard on the heels of the cavalry, and holding all that they had gained, should establish itself upon Cronje's left flank and cut his connection with Bloemfontein. It is this portion of the operations which has now... Nonfictions - Post by : Donwhale - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur Conan Doyle - Read : 2350

Great Boer War - Chapter 18. The Siege And Relief Of Kimberley Great Boer War - Chapter 18. The Siege And Relief Of Kimberley

Great Boer War - Chapter 18. The Siege And Relief Of Kimberley
It has already been narrated how, upon the arrival of the army corps from England, the greater part was drafted to Natal, while some went to the western side, and started under Lord Methuen upon the perilous enterprise of the relief of Kimberley. It has also been shown how, after three expensive victories, Lord Methuen's force met with a paralysing reverse, and was compelled to remain inactive within twenty miles of the town which they had come to succour. Before I describe how that succour did eventually arrive, some attention must be paid to the incidents which had occurred within the... Nonfictions - Post by : Donwhale - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur Conan Doyle - Read : 2478

Great Boer War - Chapter 17. Buller's Final Advance Great Boer War - Chapter 17. Buller's Final Advance

Great Boer War - Chapter 17. Buller's Final Advance
The heroic moment of the siege of Ladysmith was that which witnessed the repulse of the great attack. The epic should have ended at that dramatic instant. But instead of doing so the story falls back to an anticlimax of crowded hospitals, slaughtered horses, and sporadic shell fire. For another six weeks of inactivity the brave garrison endured all the sordid evils which had steadily grown from inconvenience to misfortune and from misfortune to misery. Away in the south they heard the thunder of Buller's guns, and from the hills round the town they watched with pale faces and bated breath... Nonfictions - Post by : Donwhale - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur Conan Doyle - Read : 632

Great Boer War - Chapter 16. Vaalkranz Great Boer War - Chapter 16. Vaalkranz

Great Boer War - Chapter 16. Vaalkranz
Neither General Buller nor his troops appeared to be dismayed by the failure of their plans, or by the heavy losses which were entailed by the movement which culminated at Spion Kop. The soldiers grumbled, it is true, at not being let go, and swore that even if it cost them two-thirds of their number they could and would make their way through this labyrinth of hills with its fringe of death. So doubtless they might. But from first to last their General had shown a great--some said an exaggerated--respect for human life, and he had no intention of winning a... Nonfictions - Post by : Donwhale - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur Conan Doyle - Read : 1389

Great Boer War - Chapter 12. The Dark Hour Great Boer War - Chapter 12. The Dark Hour

Great Boer War - Chapter 12. The Dark Hour
The week which extended from December 10th to December 17th, 1899, was the blackest one known during our generation, and the most disastrous for British arms during the century. We had in the short space of seven days lost, beyond all extenuation or excuse, three separate actions. No single defeat was of vital importance in itself, but the cumulative effect, occurring as they did to each of the main British forces in South Africa, was very great. The total loss amounted to about three thousand men and twelve guns, while the indirect effects in the way of loss of prestige to... Nonfictions - Post by : shyjumohan - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur Conan Doyle - Read : 819

Great Boer War - Chapter 11. Battle Of Colenso Great Boer War - Chapter 11. Battle Of Colenso

Great Boer War - Chapter 11. Battle Of Colenso
Two serious defeats had within the week been inflicted upon the British forces in South Africa. Cronje, lurking behind his trenches and his barbed wire entanglements barred Methuen's road to Kimberley, while in the northern part of Cape Colony Gatacre's wearied troops had been defeated and driven by a force which consisted largely of British subjects. But the public at home steeled their hearts and fixed their eyes steadily upon Natal. There was their senior General and there the main body of their troops. As brigade after brigade and battery after battery touched at Cape Town, and were sent on instantly... Nonfictions - Post by : shyjumohan - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur Conan Doyle - Read : 730