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Human Machine - Chapter 16. Reason, Reason! Human Machine - Chapter 16. Reason, Reason!

Human Machine - Chapter 16. Reason, Reason!
CHAPTER XVI. REASON, REASON!In conclusion, I must insist upon several results of what I may call the 'intensive culture' of the reason. The brain will not only grow more effectively powerful in the departments of life where the brain is supposed specially to work, but it will also enlarge the circle of its activities. It will assuredly interfere in everything. The student of himself must necessarily conduct his existence more and more according to the views of his brain. This will be most salutary and agreeable both for himself and for the rest of the world. You object. You say it... Nonfictions - Post by : Brent - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arnold Bennett - Read : 2195

Human Machine - Chapter 15. L.S.D. Human Machine - Chapter 15. L.S.D.

Human Machine - Chapter 15. L.S.D.
CHAPTER XV. L.S.DAnybody who really wishes to talk simple truth about money at the present time is confronted by a very serious practical difficulty. He must put himself in opposition to the overwhelming body of public opinion, and resign himself to being regarded either as a _poseur_, a crank, or a fool. The public is in search of happiness now, as it was a million years ago. Money is not the principal factor in happiness. It may be argued whether, as a factor in happiness, money is of twentieth-rate importance or fiftieth-rate importance. But it cannot be argued whether money, in... Nonfictions - Post by : Brent - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arnold Bennett - Read : 2973

Human Machine - Chapter 14. A Man And His Environment Human Machine - Chapter 14. A Man And His Environment

Human Machine - Chapter 14. A Man And His Environment
CHAPTER XIV. A MAN AND HIS ENVIRONMENTI now come to an entirely different aspect of the whole subject. Hitherto I have dealt with the human machine as a contrivance for adapting the man to his environment. My aim has been to show how much depends on the machine and how little depends on the environment, and that the essential business of the machine is to utilise, for making the stuff of life, the particular environment in which it happens to find itself--and no other! All this, however, does not imply that one must accept, fatalistically and permanently and passively, any preposterous... Nonfictions - Post by : Brent - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arnold Bennett - Read : 1608

Human Machine - Chapter 13. Success And Failure Human Machine - Chapter 13. Success And Failure

Human Machine - Chapter 13. Success And Failure
CHAPTER XIII. SUCCESS AND FAILUREI am sadly aware that these brief chapters will be apt to convey, especially to the trustful and enthusiastic reader, a false impression; the impression of simplicity; and that when experience has roughly corrected this impression, the said reader, unless he is most solemnly warned, may abandon the entire enterprise in a fit of disgust, and for ever afterwards maintain a cynical and impolite attitude towards all theories of controlling the human machine. Now, the enterprise is not a simple one. It is based on one simple principle--the conscious discipline of the brain by selected habits of... Nonfictions - Post by : Brent - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arnold Bennett - Read : 2525

Human Machine - Chapter 12. An Interest In Life Human Machine - Chapter 12. An Interest In Life

Human Machine - Chapter 12. An Interest In Life
CHAPTER XII. AN INTEREST IN LIFEAfter a certain period of mental discipline, of deliberate habit-forming and habit-breaking, such as I have been indicating, a man will begin to acquire at any rate a superficial knowledge, a nodding acquaintance, with that wonderful and mysterious affair, his brain, and he will also begin to perceive how important a factor in daily life is the control of his brain. He will assuredly be surprised at the miracles which lie between his collar and his hat, in that queer box that he calls his head. For the effects that can be accomplished by mere steady,... Nonfictions - Post by : Robins - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arnold Bennett - Read : 3099

Human Machine - Chapter 11. An Interlude Human Machine - Chapter 11. An Interlude

Human Machine - Chapter 11. An Interlude
CHAPTER XI. AN INTERLUDEFor ten chapters you have stood it, but not without protest. I know the feeling which is in your minds, and which has manifested itself in numerous criticisms of my ideas. That feeling may be briefly translated, perhaps, thus: 'This is all very well, but it isn't true, not a bit! It's only a fairy-tale that you have been telling us. Miracles don't happen,' etc. I, on my part, have a feeling that unless I take your feeling in hand at once, and firmly deal with it, I had better put my shutters up, for you will have... Nonfictions - Post by : Robins - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arnold Bennett - Read : 2024

Human Machine - Chapter 7. What 'Living' Chiefly Is Human Machine - Chapter 7. What 'Living' Chiefly Is

Human Machine - Chapter 7. What 'Living' Chiefly Is
CHAPTER VII. WHAT 'LIVING' CHIEFLY ISIt is in intercourse--social, sentimental, or business--with one's fellows that the qualities and the condition of the human machine are put to the test and strained. That part of my life which I conduct by myself, without reference--or at any rate without direct reference--to others, I can usually manage in such a way that the gods do not positively weep at the spectacle thereof. My environment is simpler, less puzzling, when I am alone, my calm and my self-control less liable to violent fluctuations. Impossible to be disturbed by a chair! Impossible that a chair should... Nonfictions - Post by : Shdwstr - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arnold Bennett - Read : 2188

Human Machine - Chapter 6. Lord Over The Noddle Human Machine - Chapter 6. Lord Over The Noddle

Human Machine - Chapter 6. Lord Over The Noddle
CHAPTER VI. LORD OVER THE NODDLEHaving proved by personal experiment the truth of the first of the two great principles which concern the human machine--namely, that the brain is a servant, not a master, and can be controlled--we may now come to the second. The second is more fundamental than the first, but it can be of no use until the first is understood and put into practice. The human machine is an apparatus of brain and muscle for enabling the Ego to develop freely in the universe by which it is surrounded, without friction. Its function is to convert the... Nonfictions - Post by : Robins - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arnold Bennett - Read : 1116

Human Machine - Chapter 5. Habit-Forming By Concentration Human Machine - Chapter 5. Habit-Forming By Concentration

Human Machine - Chapter 5. Habit-Forming By Concentration
CHAPTER V. HABIT-FORMING BY CONCENTRATIONAs soon as the will has got the upper hand of the brain--as soon as it can say to the brain, with a fair certainty of being obeyed: 'Do this. Think along these lines, and continue to do so without wandering until I give you leave to stop'--then is the time arrived when the perfecting of the human machine may be undertaken in a large and comprehensive spirit, as a city council undertakes the purification and reconstruction of a city. The tremendous possibilities of an obedient brain will be perceived immediately we begin to reflect upon what... Nonfictions - Post by : Robins - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arnold Bennett - Read : 1724

Human Machine - Chapter 4. The First Practical Step Human Machine - Chapter 4. The First Practical Step

Human Machine - Chapter 4. The First Practical Step
CHAPTER IV. THE FIRST PRACTICAL STEPThe brain is a highly quaint organism. Let me say at once, lest I should be cannonaded by physiologists, psychologists, or metaphysicians, that by the 'brain' I mean the faculty which reasons and which gives orders to the muscles. I mean exactly what the plain man means by the brain. The brain is the diplomatist which arranges relations between our instinctive self and the universe, and it fulfils its mission when it provides for the maximum of freedom to the instincts with the minimum of friction. It argues with the instincts. It takes them on one... Nonfictions - Post by : fastt2wealth - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arnold Bennett - Read : 2712

Human Machine - Chapter 3. The Brain As A Gentleman-At-Large Human Machine - Chapter 3. The Brain As A Gentleman-At-Large

Human Machine - Chapter 3. The Brain As A Gentleman-At-Large
CHAPTER III. THE BRAIN AS A GENTLEMAN-AT-LARGEIt is not as if, in this business of daily living, we were seriously hampered by ignorance either as to the results which we ought to obtain, or as to the general means which we must employ in order to obtain them. With all our absorption in the mere preliminaries to living, and all our carelessness about living itself, we arrive pretty soon at a fairly accurate notion of what satisfactory living is, and we perceive with some clearness the methods necessary to success. I have pictured the man who wakes up in the middle... Nonfictions - Post by : eforinfo - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arnold Bennett - Read : 564

Human Machine - Chapter 2. Amateurs In The Art Of Living Human Machine - Chapter 2. Amateurs In The Art Of Living

Human Machine - Chapter 2. Amateurs In The Art Of Living
CHAPTER II. AMATEURS IN THE ART OF LIVINGConsidering that we have to spend the whole of our lives in this human machine, considering that it is our sole means of contact and compromise with the rest of the world, we really do devote to it very little attention. When I say 'we,' I mean our inmost spirits, the instinctive part, the mystery within that exists. And when I say 'the human machine' I mean the brain and the body--and chiefly the brain. The expression of the soul by means of the brain and body is what we call the art of... Nonfictions - Post by : Robins - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arnold Bennett - Read : 2409

Human Machine - Chapter 1. Taking Oneself For Granted Human Machine - Chapter 1. Taking Oneself For Granted

Human Machine - Chapter 1. Taking Oneself For Granted
CHAPTER I. TAKING ONESELF FOR GRANTEDThere are men who are capable of loving a machine more deeply than they can love a woman. They are among the happiest men on earth. This is not a sneer meanly shot from cover at women. It is simply a statement of notorious fact. Men who worry themselves to distraction over the perfecting of a machine are indubitably blessed beyond their kind. Most of us have known such men. Yesterday they were constructing motorcars. But to-day aeroplanes are in the air--or, at any rate, they ought to be, according to the inventors. Watch the inventors.... Nonfictions - Post by : Mark_Pocock - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arnold Bennett - Read : 3161

The Roll-call - Part 1 - Chapter 9. Competition The Roll-call - Part 1 - Chapter 9. Competition

The Roll-call - Part 1 - Chapter 9. Competition
PART I CHAPTER IX. COMPETITIONIOn the face of the door on the third floor of the house in Russell Square the words 'G.E. Cannon' appeared in dirty white paint and the freshly added initials 'A.R.I.B.A.' in clean white paint. The addition of the triumphant initials (indicating that George had kissed the rod of the Royal Institute of British Architects in order to conquer) had put the sign as a whole out of centre, throwing it considerably to the right on the green door-face. Within the small and bare room, on an evening in earliest spring in 1904, sat George at the... Long Stories - Post by : gftgd - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arnold Bennett - Read : 747

The Roll-call - Part 1 - Chapter 8. Inspiration The Roll-call - Part 1 - Chapter 8. Inspiration

The Roll-call - Part 1 - Chapter 8. Inspiration
PART I CHAPTER VIII. INSPIRATIONIGeorge, despite his own dispositions, as he went up in the lift, to obviate the danger of such a mishap, was put out of countenance by the overwhelming splendour of Miss Irene Wheeler's flat. And he did not quite recover his aplomb until the dinner was nearly finished. The rooms were very large and lofty; they blazed with electric light, though the day had not yet gone; they gleamed with the polish of furniture, enamel, bookbindings, marble, ivory, and precious metals; they were ennobled by magnificent pictures, and purified by immense quantities of lovely flowers. George had... Long Stories - Post by : gftgd - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arnold Bennett - Read : 969

The Roll-call - Part 1 - Chapter 7. The Rupture The Roll-call - Part 1 - Chapter 7. The Rupture

The Roll-call - Part 1 - Chapter 7. The Rupture
PART I CHAPTER VII. THE RUPTUREIDuring the whole of the next day George waited for a letter from Marguerite. There was nothing at the club by the first post; he went to the office, hoping that as he had addressed his telegram from Russell Square she might have written to Russell Square; there was nothing at Russell Square. At lunch-time no word had arrived at the club; when the office closed no word had arrived at the office; the last post brought nothing to the club. He might have sent another telegram to Alexandra Grove, but he was too proud to... Long Stories - Post by : gftgd - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arnold Bennett - Read : 2565

The Roll-call - Part 1 - Chapter 6. The Dinner The Roll-call - Part 1 - Chapter 6. The Dinner

The Roll-call - Part 1 - Chapter 6. The Dinner
PART I CHAPTER VI. THE DINNERIEarly on the morning of a Tuesday in the second half of June 1903, George Cannon was moving fast on a motor-bicycle westwards down the slope of Piccadilly. At any rate he had the sensation of earliness, and was indeed thereby quite invigorated; it almost served instead of the breakfast which he had not yet taken. But thousands of people travelling in the opposite direction in horse-omnibuses and in a few motor-buses seemed to regard the fact of their being abroad at that hour as dully normal. They had fought, men and girls, for places in... Long Stories - Post by : Fred_E - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arnold Bennett - Read : 754

The Roll-call - Part 1 - Chapter 5. The Tea The Roll-call - Part 1 - Chapter 5. The Tea

The Roll-call - Part 1 - Chapter 5. The Tea
PART I CHAPTER V. THE TEAI"Tea is ready, Mr. Cannon," said Mr. Haim in his most courteous style, coming softly into George's room. And George looked up at the old man's wrinkled face, and down at his crimson slippers, with the benevolent air of a bookworm permitting himself to be drawn away from an ideal world into the actual. Glasses on the end of George's nose would have set off the tableau, but George had outgrown the spectacles which had disfigured his boyhood. As a fact, since his return that afternoon from Mrs. John's, he had, to the detriment of modesty... Long Stories - Post by : Fred_E - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arnold Bennett - Read : 2485

The Roll-call - Part 1 - Chapter 4. The Luncheon The Roll-call - Part 1 - Chapter 4. The Luncheon

The Roll-call - Part 1 - Chapter 4. The Luncheon
PART I CHAPTER IV. THE LUNCHEONIGeorge, having had breakfast in bed, opened his door for the second time that morning, and duly found on the mat the can of hot water (covered with a bit of old blanket) and the can of cold water which comprised the material for his bath. There was no sound in the house. The new spouse might be upstairs or she might be downstairs--he could not tell; but the cans proved that she was immanent and regardful; indeed, she never forgot anything. And George's second state at No. 8 was physically even better than his first.... Long Stories - Post by : Fred_E - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arnold Bennett - Read : 572

The Roll-call - Part 1 - Chapter 3. The Charwoman The Roll-call - Part 1 - Chapter 3. The Charwoman

The Roll-call - Part 1 - Chapter 3. The Charwoman
PART I CHAPTER III. THE CHARWOMANIGeorge entered Alexandra Grove very early the next evening, having dined inadequately and swiftly so that he might reach the neighbourhood of Marguerite at the first moment justifiable. He would have omitted dinner and trusted to Marguerite's kitchen, only that, in view of the secrecy resolved upon, appearances had to be preserved. The secrecy in itself was delicious, but even the short experiences of the morning had shown both of them how extremely difficult it would be for two people who were everything to each other to behave as though they were nothing to each other.... Long Stories - Post by : Fred_E - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arnold Bennett - Read : 2004