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Ethics - Notes Ethics - Notes

Ethics - Notes
P 2, l. 16. For this term, as here employed, our language contains no equivalent expression except an inconvenient paraphrase. There are three senses which it bears in this treatise: the first (in which it is here employed) is its strict etymological signfication "The science of Society," and this includes everything which can bear at all upon the well-being of Man in his social capacity, "Quicquid agunt homines nostri est farrago libelli." It is in this view that it is fairly denominated most commanding and inclusive. The second sense (in which it occurs next, just below) is "Moral Philosophy." Aristotle explains... Nonfictions - Post by : tonyjohn - Date : May 2012 - Author : Aristotle - Read : 1967

Ethics - Book 10 Ethics - Book 10

Ethics - Book 10
BOOK XNext, it would seem, follows a discussion respecting Pleasure, for it is thought to be most closely bound up with our kind: and so men train the young, guiding them on their course by the rudders of Pleasure and Pain. And to like and dislike what one ought is judged to be most important for the formation of good moral character: because these feelings extend all one's life through, giving a bias towards and exerting an influence on the side of Virtue and Happiness, since men choose what is pleasant and avoid what is painful. Subjects such as these then,... Nonfictions - Post by : tonyjohn - Date : May 2012 - Author : Aristotle - Read : 1505

Ethics - Appendix Ethics - Appendix

Ethics - Appendix
On (Greek: epistaemae), from I. Post. Analyt. chap. i. and ii. (Such parts only are translated as throw light on the Ethics.) All teaching, and all intellectual learning, proceeds on the basis of previous knowledge, as will appear on an examination of all. The Mathematical Sciences, and every other system, draw their conclusions in this method. So too of reasonings, whether by syllogism, or induction: for both teach through what is previously known, the former assuming the premisses as from wise men, the latter proving universals from the evidentness of the particulars. In like manner too rhetoricians persuade, either through examples... Nonfictions - Post by : tonyjohn - Date : May 2012 - Author : Aristotle - Read : 2113

Ethics - Book 6 Ethics - Book 6

Ethics - Book 6
BOOK VII having stated in a former part of this treatise that men should choose the mean instead of either the excess or defect, and that the mean is according to the dictates of Right Reason; we will now proceed to explain this term. For in all the habits which we have expressly mentioned, as likewise in all the others, there is, so to speak, a mark with his eye fixed on which the man who has Reason tightens or slacks his rope; and there is a certain limit of those mean states which we say are in accordance with Right... Nonfictions - Post by : tonyjohn - Date : May 2012 - Author : Aristotle - Read : 2874

Ethics - Book 5 Ethics - Book 5

Ethics - Book 5
BOOK V(Sidenote:1129a) Now the points for our inquiry in respect of Justice and Injustice are, what kind of actions are their object-matter, and what kind of a mean state Justice is, and between what points the abstract principle of it, i.e. the Just, is a mean. And our inquiry shall be, if you please, conducted in the same method as we have observed in the foregoing parts of this treatise. We see then that all men mean by the term Justice a moral state such that in consequence of it men have the capacity of doing what is just, and actually... Nonfictions - Post by : tonyjohn - Date : May 2012 - Author : Aristotle - Read : 1069

Ethics - Book 4 Ethics - Book 4

Ethics - Book 4
BOOK IVI We will next speak of Liberality. Now this is thought to be the mean state, having for its object-matter Wealth: I mean, the Liberal man is praised not in the circumstances of war, nor in those which constitute the character of perfected self-mastery, nor again in judicial decisions, but in respect of giving and receiving Wealth, chiefly the former. By the term Wealth I mean "all those things whose worth is measured by money." Now the states of excess and defect in regard of Wealth are respectively Prodigality and Stinginess: the latter of these terms we attach invariably to... Nonfictions - Post by : tonyjohn - Date : May 2012 - Author : Aristotle - Read : 2300

Ethics - Book 3 Ethics - Book 3

Ethics - Book 3
BOOK IIII Now since Virtue is concerned with the regulation of feelings and actions, and praise and blame arise upon such as are voluntary, while for the involuntary allowance is made, and sometimes compassion is excited, it is perhaps a necessary task for those who are investigating the nature of Virtue to draw out the distinction between what is voluntary and what involuntary; and it is certainly useful for legislators, with respect to the assigning of honours and punishments. III Involuntary actions then are thought to be of two kinds, being done either on compulsion, or by reason of ignorance. An... Nonfictions - Post by : tonyjohn - Date : May 2012 - Author : Aristotle - Read : 2599

Ethics - Book 2 Ethics - Book 2

Ethics - Book 2
BOOK IIWell: human Excellence is of two kinds, Intellectual and Moral: now the Intellectual springs originally, and is increased subsequently, from teaching (for the most part that is), and needs therefore experience and time; whereas the Moral comes from custom, and so the Greek term denoting it is but a slight deflection from the term denoting custom in that language. From this fact it is plain that not one of the Moral Virtues comes to be in us merely by nature: because of such things as exist by nature, none can be changed by custom: a stone, for instance, by nature... Nonfictions - Post by : tonyjohn - Date : May 2012 - Author : Aristotle - Read : 2107

Ethics - Book 1 Ethics - Book 1

Ethics - Book 1
BOOK IEvery art, and every science reduced to a teachable form, and in like manner every action and moral choice, aims, it is thought, at some good: for which reason a common and by no means a bad description of the Chief Good is, "that which all things aim at." Now there plainly is a difference in the Ends proposed: for in some cases they are acts of working, and in others certain works or tangible results beyond and beside the acts of working: and where there are certain Ends beyond and beside the actions, the works are in their nature... Nonfictions - Post by : tonyjohn - Date : May 2012 - Author : Aristotle - Read : 2477

Proper And Safe Remedies Proper And Safe Remedies

Proper And Safe Remedies
PROPER AND SAFE REMEDIES FOR CURING ALL THOSE DISTEMPERS THAT ARE PECULIAR TO THE FEMALE SEX AND ESPECIALLY THOSE OBSERVATIONS TO BEARING OF CHILDREN. Having finished the first part of this book, and wherein, I hope, amply made good my promise to the reader, I am now come to treat only of those distempers to which they are more subject when in a breeding condition, and those that keep them from being so; together with such proper and safe remedies as may be sufficient to repel them. And since amongst all the diseases to which human nature is subject, there is... Nonfictions - Post by : limbei - Date : September 2011 - Author : Aristotle - Read : 2402

Displaying The Secrets Of Nature Relating To Physiognomy Displaying The Secrets Of Nature Relating To Physiognomy

Displaying The Secrets Of Nature Relating To Physiognomy
CHAPTER I SECTION 1.--Of Physiognomy, showing what it is, and whence it is derived. Physiognomy is an ingenious science, or knowledge of nature, by which the inclinations and dispositions of every creature are understood, and because some of the members are uncompounded, and entire of themselves, as the tongue, the heart, etc., and some are of a mixed nature, as the eyes, the nose and others, we therefore say that there are signs which agree and live together, which inform a wise man how to make his judgment before he be too rash to deliver it to the world. Nor is... Nonfictions - Post by : leonard063083 - Date : September 2011 - Author : Aristotle - Read : 1444

The Categories The Categories

The Categories
The Categories By Aristotle Translated by E. M. Edghill  Section 1 Part 1 Things are said to be named 'equivocally' when, though they have a common name, the definition corresponding with the name differs for each. Thus, a real man and a figure in a picture can both lay claim to the name 'animal'; yet these are equivocally so named, for, though they have a common name, the definition corresponding with the name differs for each. For should any one define in what sense each is an animal, his definition in the one case will be appropriate to that case only.... Nonfictions - Post by : SimonUK71 - Date : March 2011 - Author : Aristotle - Read : 2560

Poetics Poetics

Poetics
THE POETICS OF ARISTOTLE By Aristotle A Translation By S. H. Butcher (Transcriber's Annotations and Conventions: the translator left intact some Greek words to illustrate a specific point of the original discourse. In this transcription, in order to retain the accuracy of this text, those words are rendered by spelling out each Greek letter individually, such as {alpha beta gamma delta...}. The reader can distinguish these words by the enclosing braces {}. Where multiple words occur together, they are separated by the "/" symbol for clarity. Readers who do not speak or read the Greek language will usually neither gain nor... Nonfictions - Post by : hotbobs - Date : March 2011 - Author : Aristotle - Read : 509

A Treatise On Government - BOOK VIII - Chapter VII A Treatise On Government - BOOK VIII - Chapter VII

A Treatise On Government - BOOK VIII - Chapter VII
We are now to enter into an inquiry concerning harmony and rhythm;whether all sorts of these are to be employed in education, or whethersome peculiar ones are to be selected; and also whether we should givethe same directions to those who are engaged in music as part ofeducation, or whether there is something different from these two.Now, as all music consists in melody and rhythm, we ought not to beunacquainted with the power which each of these has in education; andwhether we should rather choose music in which melody prevails, orrhythm: but when I consider how many things have been well... Nonfictions - Post by : Jigar_Banker - Date : January 2011 - Author : Aristotle - Read : 1982

A Treatise On Government - BOOK VIII - Chapter VI A Treatise On Government - BOOK VIII - Chapter VI

A Treatise On Government - BOOK VIII - Chapter VI
ill now determine whether it is proper that children should betaught to sing, and play upon any instrument, which we have beforemade a matter of doubt. Now, it is well known that it makes a greatdeal of difference when you would qualify any one in any art, for theperson himself to learn the practical part of it; for it is a thingvery difficult, if not impossible, for a man to be a good judge ofwhat he himself cannot do. It is also very necessary that childrenshould have some employment which will amuse them; for which reasonthe rattle of Archytas seems well... Nonfictions - Post by : eagle75 - Date : January 2011 - Author : Aristotle - Read : 2352

A Treatise On Government - BOOK VIII - Chapter V A Treatise On Government - BOOK VIII - Chapter V

A Treatise On Government - BOOK VIII - Chapter V
respect to music we have already spoken a little in a doubtfulmanner upon this subject. It will be proper to go over again moreparticularly what we then said, which may serve as an introduction towhat any other person may choose to offer thereon; for it is no easymatter to distinctly point out what power it has, nor on what accountsone should apply it, whether as an amusement and refreshment, as sleepor wine; as these are nothing serious, but pleasing, and the killersof care, as Euripides says; for which reason they class in the sameorder and use for the same purpose all... Nonfictions - Post by : Jeff_Casmer - Date : January 2011 - Author : Aristotle - Read : 558

A Treatise On Government - BOOK VIII - Chapter IV A Treatise On Government - BOOK VIII - Chapter IV

A Treatise On Government - BOOK VIII - Chapter IV
those states which seem to take the greatest care of theirchildren's education, bestow their chief attention on wrestling,though it both prevents the increase of the body and hurts the form ofit. This fault the Lacedaemonians did not fall into, for they madetheir children fierce by painful labour, as chiefly useful to inspirethem with courage: though, as we have already often said, this isneither the only thing nor the principal thing necessary to attend to;and even with respect to this they may not thus attain their end; forwe do not find either in other animals, or other nations, that couragenecessarily attends the... Nonfictions - Post by : leapoffaith - Date : January 2011 - Author : Aristotle - Read : 1800

A Treatise On Government - BOOK VIII - Chapter III A Treatise On Government - BOOK VIII - Chapter III

A Treatise On Government - BOOK VIII - Chapter III
There are four things which it is usual to teach children--reading,gymnastic exercises, and music, to which (in the fourth place) someadd painting. Reading and painting are both of them of singular usein life, and gymnastic exercises, as productive of courage. As tomusic, some persons may doubt, as most persons now use it for the sakeof pleasure: but those who originally made it part of education didit because, as has been already said, nature requires that we shouldnot only be properly employed, but to be able to enjoy leisurehonourably: for this (to repeat what I have already... Nonfictions - Post by : dockrue - Date : January 2011 - Author : Aristotle - Read : 1635

A Treatise On Government - BOOK VIII - Chapter II A Treatise On Government - BOOK VIII - Chapter II

A Treatise On Government - BOOK VIII - Chapter II
education is, and how children ought to be instructed, is whatshould be well known; for there are doubts concerning the business ofit, as all people do not agree in those things they would have a childtaught, both with respect to their improvement in virtue and a happylife: nor is it clear whether the object of it should be to improvethe reason or rectify the morals. From the present mode of educationwe cannot determine with certainty to which men incline, whether toinstruct a child in what will be useful to him in life; or what tendsto virtue, and what is excellent: for... Nonfictions - Post by : DonTino - Date : January 2011 - Author : Aristotle - Read : 1891

A Treatise On Government - BOOK VIII - Chapter I A Treatise On Government - BOOK VIII - Chapter I

A Treatise On Government - BOOK VIII - Chapter I
ne can doubt that the maigstrate ought greatly to interest himselfin the care of youth; for where it is neglected it is hurtful to thecity, for every state ought to be governed according to its particularnature; for the form and manners of each government are peculiar toitself; and these, as they originally established it, so they usuallystill preserve it. For instance, democratic forms and manners ademocracy; oligarchic, an oligarchy: but, universally, the bestmanners produce the best government. Besides, as in every business andart there are some things which men are to learn first and be madeaccustomed to, which are necessary to... Nonfictions - Post by : dockrue - Date : January 2011 - Author : Aristotle - Read : 1401