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Becket - ACT V Becket - ACT V

Becket - ACT V
ACT VSCENE I.--_Castle in Normandy. King's Chamber_. HENRY, ROGER OF YORK, FOLIOT, JOCELYN OF SALISBURY. ROGER OF YORK.Nay, nay, my liege,He rides abroad with armed followers,Hath broken all his promises to thyself,Cursed and anathematised us right and left,Stirr'd up a party there against your son-- HENRY.Roger of York, you always hated him,Even when you both were boys at Theobald's. ROGER OF YORK.I always hated boundless arrogance.In mine own cause I strove against him there,And in thy cause I strive against him now. HENRY.I cannot think he moves against my son,Knowing right well with what a tendernessHe... Plays - Post by : betty17 - Date : July 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 734

Becket - ACT IV Becket - ACT IV

Becket - ACT IV
ACT IVSCENE I.--_The Outskirts of the Bower_. GEOFFREY (_coming out of the wood_).Light again! light again! Margery? no, that's a finer thing there. Howit glitters! ELEANOR (_entering_).Come to me, little one. How camest thou hither? GEOFFREY.On my legs. ELEANOR.And mighty pretty legs too. Thou art the prettiest child I ever saw.Wilt thou love me? GEOFFREY.No; I only love mother. ELEANOR.Ay; and who is thy mother? GEOFFREY.They call her--But she lives secret, you see. ELEANOR.Why? GEOFFREY.Don't know why. ELEANOR.Ay, but some one comes to see her now and then. Who is he?... Plays - Post by : davmac - Date : July 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 1923

Becket - ACT III Becket - ACT III

Becket - ACT III
ACT IIISCENE I.--_The Bower_. HENRY _and ROSAMUND. HENRY.All that you say is just. I cannot answer itTill better times, when I shall put away-- ROSAMUND.What will you put away? HENRY. That which you ask meTill better times. Let it content you nowThere is no woman that I love so well. ROSAMUND.No woman but should be content with that-- HENRY.And one fair child to fondle! ROSAMUND. O yes, the childWe waited for so long--heaven's gift at last--And how you doated on him then! To-dayI almost fear'd your kiss was colder--yes--But then the child _is such a... Plays - Post by : edburdo - Date : July 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 1106

Becket - ACT II Becket - ACT II

Becket - ACT II
ACT IISCENE I.--ROSAMUND'S _Bower. A Garden of Flowers. In the midst a bankof wild-flowers with a bench before it_. _Voices heard singing among the trees_. _Duet_. 1. Is it the wind of the dawn that I hear in the pine overhead? 2. No; but the voice of the deep as it hollows the cliffs of the land. 1. Is there a voice coming up with the voice of the deep from thestrand,One coming up with a song in the flush of the glimmering red? 2. Love that is born of the deep coming up with... Plays - Post by : Lost_Dutchman - Date : July 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 2642

Becket - ACT I Becket - ACT I

Becket - ACT I
ACT ISCENE I.--BECKET'S _House in London. Chamber barely furnished_. BECKET_unrobing_. HERBERT OF BOSHAM _and SERVANT. SERVANT.Shall I not help your lordship to your rest? BECKET.Friend, am I so much better than thyselfThat thou shouldst help me? Thou art wearied outWith this day's work, get thee to thine own bed.Leave me with Herbert, friend. (_Exit SERVANT.Help me off, Herbert, with this--and this. HERBERT.Was not the people's blessing as we pastHeart-comfort and a balsam to thy blood? BECKET.The people know their Church a tower of strength,A bulwark against Throne and Baronage.Too heavy for me, this; off with it, Herbert!... Plays - Post by : kdemoise - Date : July 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 1747

Becket - PROLOGUE Becket - PROLOGUE

Becket - PROLOGUE
PROLOGUE_A Castle in Normandy. Interior of the Hall. Roofs of a City seenthro' Windows_. HENRY _and BECKET _at chess_. HENRY.So then our good Archbishop TheobaldLies dying. BECKET.I am grieved to know as much. HENRY.But we must have a mightier man than heFor his successor. BECKET. Have you thought of one? HENRY.A cleric lately poison'd his own mother,And being brought before the courts of the Church,They but degraded him. I hope they whipt him.I would have hang'd him. BECKET. It is your move. HENRY. Well--there. (_Moves_.The Church in the pell-mell of Stephen's timeHath climb'd... Plays - Post by : roweis - Date : July 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 3394

Becket - DRAMATIS PERSONAE Becket - DRAMATIS PERSONAE

Becket - DRAMATIS PERSONAE
DRAMATIS PERSONAEBECKET BY ALFRED LORD TENNYSON, POET LAUREATE CONTENTS BECKET TO THE LORD CHANCELLOR, THE RIGHT HONOURABLE EARL OF SELBORNE. MY DEAR SELBORNE, _To you, the honoured Chancellor of our own day, I dedicate thisdramatic memorial of your great predecessor;--which, altho' notintended in its present form to meet the exigencies of our moderntheatre, has nevertheless--for so you have assured me--won yourapprobation. Ever yours_, TENNYSON. _DRAMATIS PERSONAE_. HENRY II. (_son of the Earl of Anjou_).THOMAS BECKET, _Chancellor of England, afterwards Archbishop of Canterbury_.GILBERT FOLIOT, _Bishop of London_.ROGER, _Archbishop of York_.... Plays - Post by : 61668 - Date : July 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 2170

Oenone Oenone

Oenone
There lies a vale in Ida, lovelier Than all the valleys of Ionian hills. The swimming vapour slopes athwart the glen, Puts forth an arm, and creeps from pine to pine And loiters, slowly drawn. On either hand 5 The lawns and meadow-ledges midway down Hang rich in flowers, and far below them roars The long brook falling thro' the clov'n ravine In cataract after cataract to the sea. Behind the valley topmost Gargarus... Poems - Post by : glider - Date : May 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 3597

The Brook The Brook

The Brook
I come from haunts of coot and hern, I make sudden sally And sparkle out among the fern, To bicker down a valley. By thirty hills I hurry down, Or slip between the ridges, By twenty thorps, a little town, And half a hundred bridges. * * * I... Poems - Post by : trafficjon - Date : May 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 2290

Song From 'maud' (see What A Lovely Shell) Song From "maud" (see What A Lovely Shell)

Song From 'maud' (see What A Lovely Shell)
See what a lovely shell, Small and pure as a pearl, Lying close to my foot, Frail, but a work divine, Made so fairily well With delicate spire and whorl, How exquisitely minute, A miracle of design! What is it? a learned man Could give it a clumsy name. Let him name it who can, The beauty would be the same. The tiny cell is... Poems - Post by : patstone - Date : May 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 1990

Song From 'maud' (come Into The Garden, Maud) Song From "maud" (come Into The Garden, Maud)

Song From 'maud' (come Into The Garden, Maud)
Come into the garden, Maud, For the black bat, night, has flown, Come into the garden, Maud, I am here at the gate alone; And the woodbine spices are wafted abroad, And the musk of the roses blown. For a breeze of morning moves, And the planet of Love is on high, Beginning to faint in the light that she loves On a bed... Poems - Post by : brseminars - Date : May 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 1827

From 'locksley Hall' From "locksley Hall"

From 'locksley Hall'
Love took up the glass of Time, and turn'd it in his glowing hands; Every moment, lightly shaken, ran itself in golden sands. Love took up the harp of Life, and smote on all the chords with might; Smote the chord of Self, that, trembling, pass'd in music out of sight. Many a morning on the moorland did we hear the copses ring, And her whisper throng'd my pulses with the fulness of the Spring. Many an evening by the waters did we... Poems - Post by : a1forweb - Date : May 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 1668

Song From 'maud' (go Not, Happy Day) Song From "maud" (go Not, Happy Day)

Song From 'maud' (go Not, Happy Day)
Go not, happy day, From the shining fields, Go not, happy day, Till the maiden yields. Rosy is the West, Rosy is the South, Roses are her cheeks, And a rose her mouth When the happy Yes Falters from her lips, Pass and blush the news Over glowing ships; Over blowing seas,... Poems - Post by : dwierman - Date : May 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 2689

Song From 'the Princess' (sweet And Low, Sweet And Low) Song From "the Princess" (sweet And Low, Sweet And Low)

Song From 'the Princess' (sweet And Low, Sweet And Low)
Sweet and low, sweet and low, Wind of the western sea, Low, low, breathe and blow, Wind of the western sea! Over the rolling waters go, Come from the dying moon, and blow, Blow him again to me; While my little one, while my pretty one, sleeps. Sleep and rest, sleep and rest, Father will come to thee soon; Rest, rest, on mother's... Poems - Post by : kostas - Date : May 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 3581

Ring Out, Wild Bells Ring Out, Wild Bells

Ring Out, Wild Bells
Ring out, wild bells, to the wild sky, The flying cloud, the frosty light: The year is dying in the night; Ring out, wild bells, and let him die. Ring out the old, ring in the new, Ring, happy bells, across the snow: The year is going, let him go; Ring out the false, ring in the true. Ring out the... Poems - Post by : commish - Date : May 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 2485

From 'the Princess' From "the Princess"

From 'the Princess'
Tears, idle tears, I know not what they mean, Tears from the depth of some divine despair Rise in the heart, and gather to the eyes, In looking on the happy Autumn-fields, And thinking of the days that are no more. Fresh as the first beam glittering on a sail, That brings our friends up from the underworld, Sad as the last which reddens over one That sinks with all we love below the verge;... Poems - Post by : patstone - Date : May 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 965

Song From 'the Princess' (the Splendor Falls On Castle-walls) Song From "the Princess" (the Splendor Falls On Castle-walls)

Song From 'the Princess' (the Splendor Falls On Castle-walls)
The splendor falls on castle-walls And snowy summits old in story: The long light shakes across the lakes, And the wild cataract leaps in glory. Blow, bugle, blow, set the wild echoes flying, Blow, bugle; answer, echoes, dying, dying, dying. O hark, O hear! how thin and clear, And thinner, clearer, farther... Poems - Post by : andrewpearson - Date : May 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 2760

From 'enoch Arden' (the Mountain Wooded To The Peak, The Lawns) From "enoch Arden" (the Mountain Wooded To The Peak, The Lawns)

From 'enoch Arden' (the Mountain Wooded To The Peak, The Lawns)
The mountain wooded to the peak, the lawns And winding glades high up like ways to Heaven, The slender coco's drooping crown of plumes The lightning flash of insect and of bird, The lustre of the long convolvuluses That coil'd around the stately stems, and ran Ev'n to the limit of the land, the glows And glories of the broad belt of the world, All these he saw; but what he fain had seen... Poems - Post by : Mike_Carmen - Date : May 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 3014

From 'enoch Arden' (but Enoch Yearn'd To See Her Face Again) From "enoch Arden" (but Enoch Yearn'd To See Her Face Again)

From 'enoch Arden' (but Enoch Yearn'd To See Her Face Again)
But Enoch yearn'd to see her face again; 'If I might look on her sweet face again And know that she is happy.' So the thought Haunted and harass'd him, and drove him forth At evening when the dull November day Was growing duller twilight, to the hill. There he sat down gazing on all below; There did a thousand memories roll upon him, Unspeakable for sadness. By and by The ruddy square of... Poems - Post by : 2jesters - Date : May 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 1256

The Charge Of The Light Brigade The Charge Of The Light Brigade

The Charge Of The Light Brigade
I. Half a league, half a league, Half a league onward, All in the valley of Death Rode the six hundred. 'Forward, the Light Brigade!' 'Charge for the guns!' he said: Into the valley of Death Rode the six hundred. II. 'Forward, the Light Brigade!' Was there a man dismay'd? Not tho' the soldier knew Some... Poems - Post by : jaffa - Date : May 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 3311