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Harold: A Drama - ACT V - SCENE II - FIELD OF THE DEAD. NIGHT Harold: A Drama - ACT V - SCENE II - FIELD OF THE DEAD. NIGHT

Harold: A Drama - ACT V - SCENE II - FIELD OF THE DEAD. NIGHT
ACT V - SCENE II - FIELD OF THE DEAD. NIGHTALDWYTH and EDITH. ALDWYTH. O Edith, art thou here? O Harold, Harold--Our Harold--we shall never see him more. EDITH. For there was more than sister in my kiss,And so the saints were wroth. I cannot love them,For they are Norman saints--and yet I should--They are so much holier than their harlot's sonWith whom they play'd their game against the king! ALDWYTH, The king is slain, the kingdom over-thrown! EDITH. No matter! ALDWYTH. How no matter, Harold slain?--I cannot find his body. O help me thou!O Edith,... Plays - Post by : Brian_Harvard - Date : July 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 1775

Harold: A Drama - ACT V - SCENE I - A TENT ON A MOUND, FROM WHICH CAN BE SEEN THE FIELD OF SENLAC Harold: A Drama - ACT V - SCENE I - A TENT ON A MOUND, FROM WHICH CAN BE SEEN THE FIELD OF SENLAC

Harold: A Drama - ACT V - SCENE I - A TENT ON A MOUND, FROM WHICH CAN BE SEEN THE FIELD OF SENLAC
ACT V - SCENE I - A TENT ON A MOUND, FROM WHICH CAN BE SEEN THE FIELD OF SENLACHAROLD, sitting; by him standing HUGH MARGOT the Monk, GURTH,LEOFWIN, HAROLD. Refer my cause, my crown to Rome!... The wolfMudded the brook and predetermined all.Monk,Thou hast said thy say, and had my constant 'No'For all but instant battle. I hear no more. MARGOT. Hear me again--for the last time. Arise,Scatter thy people home, descend the hill,Lay hands of full allegiance in thy Lord'sAnd crave his mercy, for the Holy FatherHath given this realm of England to the Norman. HAROLD.... Plays - Post by : andymin - Date : July 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 1458

Harold: A Drama - ACT IV - SCENE III - AFTER THE BATTLE OF STAMFORD-BRIDGE. BANQUET Harold: A Drama - ACT IV - SCENE III - AFTER THE BATTLE OF STAMFORD-BRIDGE. BANQUET

Harold: A Drama - ACT IV - SCENE III - AFTER THE BATTLE OF STAMFORD-BRIDGE. BANQUET
ACT IV - SCENE III - AFTER THE BATTLE OF STAMFORD-BRIDGE. BANQUETHAROLD and ALDWYTH. GURTH, LEOFWIN, MORCAR, EDWIN,and other EARLS and THANES. VOICES. Hail! Harold! Aldwyth! hail, bridegroom and bride! ALDWYTH (talking with HAROLD).Answer them thou!Is this our marriage-banquet? Would the winesOf wedding had been dash'd into the cupsOf victory, and our marriage and thy gloryBeen drunk together! these poor hands but sew,Spin, broider--would that they were man's to have heldThe battle-axe by thee! HAROLD. There was a momentWhen being forced aloof from all my guard,And striking at Hardrada and his madmenI had wish'd for any weapon.... Plays - Post by : jabuchanan - Date : July 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 2644

Harold: A Drama - ACT IV - SCENE II - A PLAIN. BEFORE THE BATTLE OF STAMFORD-BRIDGE Harold: A Drama - ACT IV - SCENE II - A PLAIN. BEFORE THE BATTLE OF STAMFORD-BRIDGE

Harold: A Drama - ACT IV - SCENE II - A PLAIN. BEFORE THE BATTLE OF STAMFORD-BRIDGE
ACT IV - SCENE II - A PLAIN. BEFORE THE BATTLE OF STAMFORD-BRIDGEHAROLD and his GUARD. HAROLD. Who is it comes this way? Tostig? (Enter TOSTIG with a small force.) O brother,What art thou doing here? TOSTIG. I am foragingFor Norway's army. HAROLD. I could take and slay thee.Thou art in arms against us. TOSTIG. Take and slay me,For Edward loved me. HAROLD. Edward bad me spare thee. TOSTIG. I hate King Edward, for he join'd with theeTo drive me outlaw'd. Take and slay me, I say,Or I shall count... Plays - Post by : coolmailchandu - Date : July 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 1055

Harold: A Drama - ACT IV - SCENE I - IN NORTHUMBRIA Harold: A Drama - ACT IV - SCENE I - IN NORTHUMBRIA

Harold: A Drama - ACT IV - SCENE I - IN NORTHUMBRIA
ACT IV - SCENE I - IN NORTHUMBRIAARCHBISHOP ALDRED, MORCAR, EDWIN, and FORCES. Enter HAROLD.The standard of the golden Dragon of Wessex preceding him. HAROLD. What! are thy people sullen from defeat?Our Wessex dragon flies beyond the Humber,No voice to greet it. EDWIN. Let not our great kingBelieve us sullen--only shamed to the quickBefore the king--as having been so bruisedBy Harold, king of Norway; but our helpIs Harold, king of England. Pardon us, thou!Our silence is our reverence for the king! HAROLD. Earl of the Mercians! if the truth be gall,Cram me not thou with honey, when our... Plays - Post by : malistor - Date : July 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 1187

Harold: A Drama - ACT III - SCENE II - IN THE GARDEN. THE KING'S HOUSE NEAR LONDON Harold: A Drama - ACT III - SCENE II - IN THE GARDEN. THE KING'S HOUSE NEAR LONDON

Harold: A Drama - ACT III - SCENE II - IN THE GARDEN. THE KING'S HOUSE NEAR LONDON
ACT III - SCENE II - IN THE GARDEN. THE KING'S HOUSE NEAR LONDONEDITH. Crown'd, crown'd and lost, crown'd King--and lost to me! (Singing.) Two young lovers in winter weather, None to guide them, Walk'd at night on the misty heather; Night, as black as a raven's feather; Both were lost and found together, None beside them. That is the burthen of it--lost and foundTogether in the cruel river SwaleA hundred years ago; and there's another, Lost, lost, the light of day, To which the lover answers lovingly 'I am beside... Plays - Post by : kids8 - Date : July 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 2536

Harold: A Drama - ACT III - SCENE I - THE KING'S PALACE. LONDON Harold: A Drama - ACT III - SCENE I - THE KING'S PALACE. LONDON

Harold: A Drama - ACT III - SCENE I - THE KING'S PALACE. LONDON
ACT III - SCENE I - THE KING'S PALACE. LONDONKING EDWARD _dying on a couch, and by him standing the QUEEN, HAROLD,ARCHBISHOP STIGAND, GURTH, LEOFWIN, ARCHBISHOP ALDRED, ALDWYTH, _and_EDITH. STIGAND. Sleeping or dying there? If this be death,Then our great Council wait to crown thee King--Come hither, I have a power; (To HAROLD.) They call me near, for I am close to theeAnd England--I, old shrivell'd Stigand, I,Dry as an old wood-fungus on a dead tree,I have a power!See here this little key about my neck!There lies a treasure buried down in Ely:If e'er the Norman grow... Plays - Post by : Gloria_Nye - Date : July 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 2687

Harold: A Drama - ACT II - SCENE II - BAYEUX. PALACE Harold: A Drama - ACT II - SCENE II - BAYEUX. PALACE

Harold: A Drama - ACT II - SCENE II - BAYEUX. PALACE
ACT II - SCENE II - BAYEUX. PALACECOUNT WILLIAM and WILLIAM MALET. WILLIAM. We hold our Saxon woodcock in the springe,But he begins to flutter. As I thinkHe was thine host in England when I wentTo visit Edward. MALET. Yea, and there, my lord,To make allowance for their rougher fashions,I found him all a noble host should be. WILLIAM. Thou art his friend: thou know'st my claim on EnglandThro' Edward's promise: we have him in the toils.And it were well, if thou shouldst let him feel,How dense a fold of danger nets him round,So that he bristle... Plays - Post by : johannes - Date : July 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 1583

Harold: A Drama - ACT II - SCENE I - SEASHORE. PONTHIEU. NIGHT Harold: A Drama - ACT II - SCENE I - SEASHORE. PONTHIEU. NIGHT

Harold: A Drama - ACT II - SCENE I - SEASHORE. PONTHIEU. NIGHT
ACT II - SCENE I - SEASHORE. PONTHIEU. NIGHTHAROLD and his MEN, wrecked. HAROLD. Friends, in that last inhospitable plungeOur boat hath burst her ribs; but ours are whole;I have but bark'd my hands. ATTENDANT. I dug mine intoMy old fast friend the shore, and clinging thusFelt the remorseless outdraught of the deepHaul like a great strong fellow at my legs,And then I rose and ran. The blast that cameSo suddenly hath fallen as suddenly--Put thou the comet and this blast together-- HAROLD. Put thou thyself and mother-wit together.Be not a fool! ( Enter FISHERMEN... Plays - Post by : onehand - Date : July 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 2322

Harold: A Drama - ACT I - SCENE II - IN THE GARDEN. THE KING'S HOUSE NEAR LONDON. SUNSET Harold: A Drama - ACT I - SCENE II - IN THE GARDEN. THE KING'S HOUSE NEAR LONDON. SUNSET

Harold: A Drama - ACT I - SCENE II - IN THE GARDEN. THE KING'S HOUSE NEAR LONDON. SUNSET
ACT I - SCENE II - IN THE GARDEN. THE KING'S HOUSE NEAR LONDON. SUNSETEDITH. Mad for thy mate, passionate nightingale....I love thee for it--ay, but stay a moment;He can but stay a moment: he is going.I fain would hear him coming!... near me ... near.Somewhere--To draw him nearer with a charmLike thine to thine. (Singing.) Love is come with a song and a smile, Welcome Love with a smile and a song: Love can stay but a little while. Why cannot he stay? They call him away: Ye do him wrong, ye do him wrong; Love will stay... Plays - Post by : simba111 - Date : July 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 3305

Harold: A Drama - ACT I - SCENE I - LONDON. THE KING'S PALACE Harold: A Drama - ACT I - SCENE I - LONDON. THE KING'S PALACE

Harold: A Drama - ACT I - SCENE I - LONDON. THE KING'S PALACE
ACT I - SCENE I - LONDON. THE KING'S PALACE(A comet seen through the open window.) ALDWYTH, GAMEL, COURTIERS talking together. FIRST COURTIER. Lo! there once more--this is the seventh night!Yon grimly-glaring, treble-brandish'd scourge Of England! SECOND COURTIER. Horrible! FIRST COURTIER. Look you, there's a starThat dances in it as mad with agony! THIRD COURTIER. Ay, like a spirit in Hell who skips and fliesTo right and left, and cannot scape the flame. SECOND COURTIER. Steam'd upward from the undescendableAbysm. FIRST COURTIER. Or floated downward from the throneOf God Almighty. ALDWYTH. Gamel,... Plays - Post by : teamworking - Date : July 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 729

Harold: A Drama - DRAMATIS PERSONAE Harold: A Drama - DRAMATIS PERSONAE

Harold: A Drama - DRAMATIS PERSONAE
DRAMATIS PERSONAETO HIS EXCELLENCY THE RIGHT HON. LORD LYTTON, VICEROY ANDGOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA. My Dear Lord Lytton,--After old-world records--such as the Bayeuxtapestry and the Roman de Rou,--Edward Freeman's History of the NormanConquest, and your father's Historical Romance treating of the sametimes, have been mainly helpful to me in writing this Drama. Yourfather dedicated his 'Harold' to my father's brother; allow me todedicate my 'Harold' to yourself. A. TENNYSON. SHOW-DAY AT BATTLE ABBEY, 1876. A garden here--May breath and bloom of spring--The cuckoo yonder from an English elmCrying 'with my false egg I overwhelmThe native nest:' and fancy... Plays - Post by : Thongchai - Date : July 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 708

Queen Mary: A Drama - ACT V - SCENE V - LONDON. A ROOM IN THE PALACE Queen Mary: A Drama - ACT V - SCENE V - LONDON. A ROOM IN THE PALACE

Queen Mary: A Drama - ACT V - SCENE V - LONDON. A ROOM IN THE PALACE
ACT V - SCENE V - LONDON. A ROOM IN THE PALACEA Gallery on one side. The moonlight streaming through a range ofwindows on the wall opposite. MARY, LADY CLARENCE, LADY MAGDALENDACRES, ALICE. QUEEN pacing the Gallery. A writing table in front.QUEEN comes to the table and writes and goes again, pacing theGallery. LADY CLARENCE. Mine eyes are dim: what hath she written? read. ALICE. 'I am dying, Philip; come to me.' LADY MAGDALEN. There--up and down, poor lady, up and down. ALICE. And how her shadow crosses one by oneThe moonlight casements pattern'd on the wall,Following... Plays - Post by : Calvin - Date : July 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 1859

Queen Mary: A Drama - ACT V - SCENE IV - LONDON. BEFORE THE PALACE Queen Mary: A Drama - ACT V - SCENE IV - LONDON. BEFORE THE PALACE

Queen Mary: A Drama - ACT V - SCENE IV - LONDON. BEFORE THE PALACE
ACT V - SCENE IV - LONDON. BEFORE THE PALACEA light burning within. VOICES of the night passing. FIRST. Is not yon light in the Queen's chamber? SECOND. Ay,They say she's dying. FIRST. So is Cardinal Pole.May the great angels join their wings, and makeDown for their heads to heaven! SECOND. Amen. Come on. (Exeunt.) TWO OTHERS. FIRST. There's the Queen's light. I hear she cannot live. SECOND. God curse her and her Legate! Gardiner burnsAlready; but to pay them full in kind,The hottest hold in all the devil's denWere... Plays - Post by : ksmason - Date : July 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 1477

Queen Mary: A Drama - ACT V - SCENE III - A HOUSE NEAR LONDON Queen Mary: A Drama - ACT V - SCENE III - A HOUSE NEAR LONDON

Queen Mary: A Drama - ACT V - SCENE III - A HOUSE NEAR LONDON
ACT V - SCENE III - A HOUSE NEAR LONDONELIZABETH, STEWARD OF THE HOUSEHOLD, ATTENDANTS. ELIZABETH. There's half an angel wrong'd in your account;Methinks I am all angel, that I bear itWithout more ruffling. Cast it o'er again. STEWARD. I were whole devil if I wrong'd you, Madam. (Exit STEWARD.) ATTENDANT. The Count de Feria, from the King of Spain. ELIZABETH. Ay!--let him enter. Nay, you need not go: (To her LADIES.) Remain within the chamber, but apart.We'll have no private conference. Welcome toEngland! (Enter FERIA.) FERIA. Fair island star!... Plays - Post by : Nenad - Date : July 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 2360

Queen Mary: A Drama - ACT V - SCENE II - A ROOM IN THE PALACE Queen Mary: A Drama - ACT V - SCENE II - A ROOM IN THE PALACE

Queen Mary: A Drama - ACT V - SCENE II - A ROOM IN THE PALACE
ACT V - SCENE II - A ROOM IN THE PALACEMARY, sitting: a rose in her hand. LADY CLARENCE. ALICE in thebackground. MARY. Look! I have play'd with this poor rose so longI have broken off the head. LADY CLARENCE. Your Grace hath beenMore merciful to many a rebel headThat should have fallen, and may rise again. MARY. There were not many hang'd for Wyatt's rising. LADY CLARENCE. Nay, not two hundred. MARY. I could weep for themAnd her, and mine own self and all the world. LADY CLARENCE. For her? for whom, your... Plays - Post by : PJ_Tenn - Date : July 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 2080

Queen Mary: A Drama - ACT V - SCENE I - LONDON. HALL IN THE PALACE Queen Mary: A Drama - ACT V - SCENE I - LONDON. HALL IN THE PALACE

Queen Mary: A Drama - ACT V - SCENE I - LONDON. HALL IN THE PALACE
ACT V - SCENE I - LONDON. HALL IN THE PALACEQUEEN, SIR NICHOLAS HEATH. HEATH. Madam,I do assure you, that it must be look'd to:Calais is but ill-garrison'd, in GuisnesAre scarce two hundred men, and the French fleetRule in the narrow seas. It must be look'd to,If war should fall between yourself and France;Or you will lose your Calais. MARY. It shall be look'd to;I wish you a good morning, good Sir Nicholas:Here is the King. (Exit HEATH.) (Enter PHILIP.) PHILIP. Sir Nicholas tells you true,And you must look to Calais when I go.... Plays - Post by : martinbrett - Date : July 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 3148

Queen Mary: A Drama - ACT IV - SCENE III - ST. MARY'S CHURCH Queen Mary: A Drama - ACT IV - SCENE III - ST. MARY'S CHURCH

Queen Mary: A Drama - ACT IV - SCENE III - ST. MARY'S CHURCH
ACT IV - SCENE III - ST. MARY'S CHURCHCOLE in the Pulpit, LORD WILLIAMS OF THAME presiding. LORD WILLIAMHOWARD, LORD PAGET, and others. CRANMER enters between SOTO andVILLA GARCIA, and the whole Choir strike up 'Nunc Dimittis.' CRANMERis set upon a Scaffold before the people. COLE. Behold him-- (A pause: people in the foreground.) PEOPLE. Oh, unhappy sight! FIRST PROTESTANT. See how the tears run down his fatherly face. SECOND PROTESTANT. James, didst thou ever see a carrion crow Standwatching a sick beast before he dies? FIRST PROTESTANT. Him perch'd up there? I wish some... Plays - Post by : Demworld - Date : July 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 992

Queen Mary: A Drama - ACT IV - SCENE II - OXFORD. CRANMER IN PRISON Queen Mary: A Drama - ACT IV - SCENE II - OXFORD. CRANMER IN PRISON

Queen Mary: A Drama - ACT IV - SCENE II - OXFORD. CRANMER IN PRISON
ACT IV - SCENE II - OXFORD. CRANMER IN PRISONCRANMER. Last night, I dream'd the faggots were alight,And that myself was fasten'd to the stake, IAnd found it all a visionary flame,Cool as the light in old decaying wood;And then King Harry look'd from out a cloud,And bad me have good courage; and I heardAn angel cry 'There is more joy in Heaven,'--And after that, the trumpet of the dead. (Trumpets without.) Why, there are trumpets blowing now: what is it? (Enter FATHER COLE.) COLE. Cranmer, I come to question you again;Have you remain'd in... Plays - Post by : 101homebiz - Date : July 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 2815

Queen Mary: A Drama - ACT IV - SCENE I - A ROOM IN THE PALACE Queen Mary: A Drama - ACT IV - SCENE I - A ROOM IN THE PALACE

Queen Mary: A Drama - ACT IV - SCENE I - A ROOM IN THE PALACE
ACT IV - SCENE I - A ROOM IN THE PALACEMARY, CARDINAL POLE. MARY. What have you there? POLE. So please your Majesty,A long petition from the foreign exilesTo spare the life of Cranmer. Bishop Thirlby,And my Lord Paget and Lord William Howard,Crave, in the same cause, hearing of your Grace.Hath he not written himself--infatuated--To sue you for his life? MARY. His life? Oh, no;Not sued for that--he knows it were in vain.But so much of the anti-papal leavenWorks in him yet, he hath pray'd me not to sullyMine own prerogative, and degrade the realmBy seeking... Plays - Post by : crystalphantasy - Date : July 2011 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 2829