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Lady Susan - LETTER VII - LADY SUSAN VERNON TO MRS. JOHNSON Lady Susan - LETTER VII - LADY SUSAN VERNON TO MRS. JOHNSON

Lady Susan - LETTER VII - LADY SUSAN VERNON TO MRS. JOHNSON
Churchhill. My dear Alicia,--You are very good in taking notice of Frederica, and I am grateful for it as a mark of your friendship; but as I cannot have any doubt of the warmth of your affection, I am far from exacting so heavy a sacrifice. She is a stupid girl, and has nothing to recommend her. I would not, therefore, on my account, have you encumber one moment of your precious time by sending for her to Edward Street, especially as every visit is so much deducted from the grand affair of education,... Long Stories - Post by : starr.angel - Author : Jane Austen - Read : 575

Seventeen - Chapter XII. PROGRESS OF THE SYMPTOMS Seventeen - Chapter XII. PROGRESS OF THE SYMPTOMS

Seventeen - Chapter XII. PROGRESS OF THE SYMPTOMS
Mrs. BAXTER'S little stroke of diplomacyhad gone straight to the mark,she was a woman of insight. For every reasonshe was well content to have her son spend hisevenings at home, though it cannot be claimedthat his presence enlivened the household, hiscondition being one of strange, trancelikeirascibility. Evening after evening passed, while hesat dreaming painfully of Mr. Parcher's porch;but in the daytime, though William did notliterally make hay while the sun shone, he atleast gathered a harvest... Long Stories - Post by : kirtlc - Author : Booth Tarkington - Read : 1485

Like His Mother Used To Make Like His Mother Used To Make

Like His Mother Used To Make
"Uncle Jake's Place," St. Jo, Mo., 1874"I was born in Indiany," says a stranger, lank and slim,As us fellers in the restarunt was kindo' guyin' him,And Uncle Jake was slidin' him another punkin pieAnd a' extry cup o' coffee, with a twinkle in his eye."I was born in Indiany-- more'n forty year' ago--I hain't be'n back in twenty-- and I'm workin' back'ards slow;But I've et in ever' restarunt 'twixt here and Santy Fee,And I want to state this coffee tastes like gittin' home, to me!""Pour us out another,... Poems - Post by : karims100 - Author : James Whitcomb Riley - Read : 3162

The Valley Of The Moon - BOOK II - Chapter XVIII The Valley Of The Moon - BOOK II - Chapter XVIII

The Valley Of The Moon - BOOK II - Chapter XVIII
It was early evening when they got off the car at Seventh andPine on their way home from Bell's Theater. Billy and Saxon didtheir little marketing together, then separated at the corner,Saxon to go on to the house and prepare supper, Billy to go andsee the boys--the teamsters who had fought on in the strikeduring his month of retirement."Take care of yourself, Billy," she called, as he started off."Sure," he answered, turning his face to her over his shoulder.Her heart leaped at the smile. It was... Long Stories - Post by : xerxes12 - Author : Jack London - Read : 904

The Crossing - Book 3. Louisiana - Chapter 7. The Disposal Of The Sieur De St. Gre The Crossing - Book 3. Louisiana - Chapter 7. The Disposal Of The Sieur De St. Gre

The Crossing - Book 3. Louisiana - Chapter 7. The Disposal Of The Sieur De St. Gre
Book III. Louisiana Chapter VII I had met Helene de St. Gre at last. And what a fool she must think me! As I hurried along the dark banquettes this thought filled my brain for a time to the exclusion of all others, so strongly is vanity ingrained in us. After all, what did it matter what she thought,--Madame la Vicomtesse d'Ivry-le-Tour? I had never shone, and it was rather late to begin. But I possessed, at least, average common sense, and I had given no proof even of this. I wandered on, not... Long Stories - Post by : pthibault - Author : Winston Churchill - Read : 1271

The Letters Of Mark Twain (complete) - Volume II - MARK TWAIN'S LETTERS 1867-1875 - Chapter X - LETTERS 1870-71. MARK TWAIN IN BUFFALO. MARRIAGE. THE BUFFALO EXPRESS. 'MEMORANDA.' The Letters Of Mark Twain (complete) - Volume II - MARK TWAIN'S LETTERS 1867-1875 - Chapter X - LETTERS 1870-71. MARK TWAIN IN BUFFALO. MARRIAGE. THE BUFFALO EXPRESS. "MEMORANDA."

The Letters Of Mark Twain (complete) - Volume II - MARK TWAIN'S LETTERS 1867-1875 - Chapter X - LETTERS 1870-71. MARK TWAIN IN BUFFALO. MARRIAGE. THE BUFFALO EXPRESS. 'MEMORANDA.'
Samuel L. Clemens and Olivia Langdon were married in the Langdon home at Elmira, February 2, 1870, and took up their residence in Buffalo in a beautiful home, a wedding present from the bride's father. The story of their wedding, and the amusing circumstances connected with their establishment in Buffalo, have been told elsewhere.--(Mark Twain: A Biography, chap. lxxiv.) Mark Twain now believed that he was through with lecturing. Two letters to Redpath, his agent, express... Nonfictions - Post by : catbalou_tess - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 1393

The House Of Seven Gables - Chapter XV - THE SCOWL AND SMILE The House Of Seven Gables - Chapter XV - THE SCOWL AND SMILE

The House Of Seven Gables - Chapter XV - THE SCOWL AND SMILE
SEVERAL days passed over the Seven Gables, heavily and drearilyenough. In fact (not to attribute the whole gloom of sky andearth to the one inauspicious circumstance of Phoebe's departure),an easterly storm had set in, and indefatigably apply itself tothe task of making the black roof and walls of the old house lookmore cheerless than ever before. Yet was the outside not half socheerless as the interior. Poor Clifford was cut off, at once,from all his scanty resources of enjoyment. Phoebe was... Long Stories - Post by : haydnellen - Author : Nathaniel Hawthorne - Read : 900

The Marble Faun - Volume II - Chapter XLII - REMINISCENCES OF MIRIAM The Marble Faun - Volume II - Chapter XLII - REMINISCENCES OF MIRIAM

The Marble Faun - Volume II - Chapter XLII - REMINISCENCES OF MIRIAM
When Hilda and himself turned away from the unfinished bust, thesculptor's mind still dwelt upon the reminiscences which it suggested."You have not seen Donatello recently," he remarked, "and thereforecannot be aware how sadly he is changed.""No wonder!" exclaimed Hilda, growing pale.The terrible scene which she had witnessed, when Donatello's facegleamed out in so fierce a light, came back upon her memory, almostfor the first time since she knelt at the confessional. Hilda, as issometimes the case... Long Stories - Post by : okeestok - Author : Nathaniel Hawthorne - Read : 3199

The Last Of The Mohicans - Chapter 11 The Last Of The Mohicans - Chapter 11

The Last Of The Mohicans - Chapter 11
CHAPTER 11"Cursed be my tribe If I forgive him."--ShylockThe Indian had selected for this desirable purpose one ofthose steep, pyramidal hills, which bear a strongresemblance to artificial mounds, and which so frequentlyoccur in the valleys of America. The one in question washigh and precipitous; its top flattened, as usual; but withone of its sides more than ordinarily irregular. Itpossessed no other apparent advantage for a resting place,than in its elevation and form, which might render defenseeasy,... Long Stories - Post by : Russell_Hayes - Author : James Fenimore Cooper - Read : 535

To A Mountain Daisy To A Mountain Daisy

To A Mountain Daisy
(On turning down with the Plough, in April, 1786.) Wee, modest crimson-tipped flow'r, Thou's met me in an evil hour; For I maun crush amang the stoure Thy slender stem: To spare thee now is past my pow'r, Thou bonie gem. Alas! it's no thy neibor sweet, The bonie lark, companion meet, Bending thee 'mang the dewy weet, Wi' spreckl'd breast! When upward-springing, blythe, to greet The purpling east. Cauld blew the bitter-biting north Upon thy early,... Poems - Post by : dhr8e - Author : Robert Burns - Read : 3167

Satisfaction Satisfaction

Satisfaction
ON READING "NOT ONE DISSATISFIED," BY WALT WHITMAN GOD spare the day when I am satisfied! Enough is truly likened to a feast that leaves man satiate. The sluggishness of fulness comes apace; the dulness of a mind that knows all things. The lack of every sweet desire; no new sensation for the soul! To want no more? What vile estate is that? What holds the morrow for the soul that’s satisfied? What holds the future for the mind content? Is aspiration worthless? Is much-abused ambition... Poems - Post by : imported_n/a - Author : John Kendrick Bangs - Read : 939

The World's Desire - BOOK III : Chapter V - THE VOICE OF THE DEAD The World's Desire - BOOK III : Chapter V - THE VOICE OF THE DEAD

The World's Desire - BOOK III : Chapter V - THE VOICE OF THE DEAD
BOOK III : CHAPTER V - THE VOICE OF THE DEADWhen Meriamun the Queen had watched the chariot of the Wanderer till it was lost in the dust of the desert, she passed down from the Palace roof to the solitude of her chamber.Here she sat in her chamber till the darkness gathered, as the evil thoughts gathered in her heart, that was rent with love of him whom she had won but to lose. Things had gone ill with her, to little purpose she had sinned after such a fashion as may not be forgiven. Yet there was... Long Stories - Post by : Dave_Espino - Author : H. Rider Haggard - Read : 944

Ballads In Blue China - Ballades in Blue China - Ballade Amoureuse Ballads In Blue China - Ballades in Blue China - Ballade Amoureuse

Ballads In Blue China - Ballades in Blue China - Ballade Amoureuse
Ballades in Blue China - Ballade AmoureuseAFTER FROISSART. Not Jason nor Medea wise,I crave to see, nor win much lore,Nor list to Orpheus' minstrelsies;Nor Her'cles would I see, that o'erThe wide world roamed from shore to shore;Nor, by St. James, Penelope, -Nor pure Lucrece, such wrong that bore:To see my Love suffices me!Virgil and Cato, no man viesWith them in wealth of clerkly store;I would not see them with mine eyes;Nor him that sailed, sans sail nor oar,Across the barren sea and hoar,And... Poems - Post by : clickalyzer - Author : Andrew Lang - Read : 2965

The Man In Chrysanthemum Land The Man In Chrysanthemum Land

The Man In Chrysanthemum Land
WRITTEN FOR "THE SPECTATOR"There's a brave little berry-brown manAt the opposite side of the earth;Of the White, and the Black, and the Tan,He's the smallest in compass and girth.O! he's little, and lively, and Tan,And he's showing the world what he's worth.For his nation is born, and its birthIs for hardihood, courage, and sand, So you take off your cap To the brave little JapWho fights for Chrysanthemum Land.Near the house that the little man keeps,There's a Bug-a-boo building its lair;It prowls,... Poems - Post by : Doug_Allen - Author : E. Pauline Johnson - Read : 1636

On Dreams, An Imitation Of Petronius On Dreams, An Imitation Of Petronius

On Dreams, An Imitation Of Petronius
Petronii Fragmenta, xxx.THOSE dreams, that on the silent night intrude,And with false flitting shades our minds deludeJove never sends us downward from the skies;Nor can they from infernal mansions rise;But are all mere productions of the brain,And fools consult interpreters in vain.(1)For when in bed we rest our weary limbs,The mind unburden'd sports in various whims;The busy head with mimic art runs o'erThe scenes and actions of the day before.(2)The drowsy tyrant, by his minions led,To regal rage... Poems - Post by : ralstonian - Author : Jonathan Swift - Read : 2186

The Isle Of Truth The Isle Of Truth

The Isle Of Truth
"While the beams of the daylight yet shine from the "west, "Sail onwards, my bark, to the isle of the blest, "Where Love blooms for ever in fondness and truth, "And Passion forgets not the vows of its youth; "Where Friendship forsakes not, tho' sorrows subdue, "And the visions of Hope are as lovely as true. "Sail onwards, my bark, to that isle of delight, "Where Joy hath no sting, and Affection no blight!" 'Twas thus sung the heart in the days of her youth, As she sailed to discover the island of... Poems - Post by : dashonly - Author : Charles Mackay - Read : 2068

The Song Of The Soldier-born The Song Of The Soldier-born

The Song Of The Soldier-born
Give me the scorn of the stars and a peak defiant; Wail of the pines and a wind with the shout of a giant; Night and a trail unknown and a heart reliant. Give me to live and love in the old, bold fashion; A soldier's billet at night and a soldier's ration; A heart that leaps to the fight with a soldier's passion. For I hold as a simple faith there's no denying: The trade of a soldier's the only trade worth plying; The death of a soldier's the only death worth dying. So let me go and leave... Poems - Post by : carlsorensen - Author : Robert W. Service - Read : 1350

The Three Kings Of Chickeraboo The Three Kings Of Chickeraboo

The Three Kings Of Chickeraboo
There were three niggers of Chickeraboo--PACIFICO, BANG-BANG, POPCHOP--whoExclaimed, one terribly sultry day,"Oh, let's be kings in a humble way."The first was a highly-accomplished "bones,"The next elicited banjo tones,The third was a quiet, retiring chap,Who danced an excellent break-down "flap.""We niggers," said they, "have formed a planBy which, whenever we like, we canExtemporise kingdoms near the beach,And then we'll collar a kingdom each."Three casks, from somebody else's stores,Shall represent... Poems - Post by : sanibel - Author : W. S. Gilbert - Read : 1443

In The Play In The Play

In The Play
In a painted "Forest of Arden," in the glare of the garish light,In doublet and hose, be-powdered and rouged, you sigh to me night by night;Attuned to the sway of your cadenced voice, as a harp to the wooing wind,I thrill at the touch of your painted lips--for--"I am your Rosalind!"Could you know that my art in seeming was a dearer thing than art,That the love-words spoken nightly spring straight from a loving heart;Could you know that my soul speaks to you--aye soul and spirit and mind!When I gaze... Poems - Post by : getwebhosting - Author : Leigh Gordon Giltner - Read : 3326

The Carlyles The Carlyles

The Carlyles
(I was talking with a newspaper man the other day who seemed to think that the fact that Mrs. Carlyle threw a teacup at Mr. Carlyle should be given to the public merely as a fact. But a fact presented to people without the proper--or even, if necessary, without the improper--human being to go with it does not mean anything and does not really become alive or caper about in people's minds. But what I want and what I believe most people want when a fact is being presented is one or two touches that... Poems - Post by : sean7 - Author : Franklin P. Adams - Read : 2181