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The Princess And The Goblin - Chapter 15. Woven And Then Spun The Princess And The Goblin - Chapter 15. Woven And Then Spun

The Princess And The Goblin - Chapter 15. Woven And Then Spun
'Come in, Irene,' said the silvery voice of her grandmother.The princess opened the door and peeped in. But the room was quite dark and there was no sound of the spinning-wheel. She grew frightened once more, thinking that, although the room was there, the old lady might be a dream after all. Every little girl knows how dreadful it is to find a room empty where she thought somebody was; but Irene had to fancy for a moment that the person she came to find was nowhere at all. She remembered, however,... Long Stories - Post by : dhouse - Author : George Macdonald - Read : 2764

The Magician - Chapter 15 The Magician - Chapter 15

The Magician - Chapter 15
Arthur wished to set about the invocation then and there, but Dr Porhoet said it was impossible. They were all exhausted after the long journey, and it was necessary to get certain things together without which nothing could be done. In his heart he thought that a night's rest would bring Arthur to a more reasonable mind. When the light of day shone upon the earth he would be ashamed of the desire which ran counter to all his prepossessions. But Arthur remembered that on the next day it would be... Long Stories - Post by : runtonk - Author : W. Somerset Maugham - Read : 447

When I Roved A Young Highlander When I Roved A Young Highlander

When I Roved A Young Highlander
1. When I rov'd a young Highlander o'er the dark heath, And climb'd thy steep summit, oh Morven of snow! (1) To gaze on the torrent that thunder'd beneath, Or the mist of the tempest that gather'd below; (2) Untutor'd by science, a stranger to fear, And rude as the rocks my infancy grew, No feeling, save one, to my bosom was dear; Need I say, my sweet Mary, (3) 'twas centred in you?2. Yet it could not be Love, for I knew not the name,-- What passion can dwell in the heart of... Poems - Post by : OnlineBooks - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 1483

The Nun's Aspiration The Nun's Aspiration

The Nun's Aspiration
The yesterday doth never smile,The day goes drudging through the while,Yet, in the name of Godhead, IThe morrow front, and can defy;Though I am weak, yet God, when prayed,Cannot withhold his conquering aid.Ah me! it was my childhood's thought,If He should make my web a blotOn life's fair picture of delight,My heart's content would find it right.But O, these waves and leaves,--When happy stoic Nature grieves,No human speech so beautifulAs their murmurs mine to lull.On this altar God hath builtI lay... Poems - Post by : hallmark - Author : Ralph Waldo Emerson - Read : 3013

James Russell Lowell James Russell Lowell

James Russell Lowell
From purest wells of English undefiledNone deeper drank than he, the New World's child,Who in the language of their farm-fields spokeThe wit and wisdom of New England folk,Shaming a monstrous wrong. The world-wide laughProvoked thereby might well have shaken halfThe walls of Slavery down, ere yet the ballAnd mine of battle overthrew them all.(The end)John Greenleaf Whittier's poem: James Russell Lowell... Poems - Post by : Hugosan - Author : John Greenleaf Whittier - Read : 1866

War And Peace - Second Epilogue - Chapter 12 War And Peace - Second Epilogue - Chapter 12

War And Peace - Second Epilogue - Chapter 12
From the time the law of Copernicus was discovered and proved, themere recognition of the fact that it was not the sun but the earththat moves sufficed to destroy the whole cosmography of theancients. By disproving that law it might have been possible to retainthe old conception of the movements of the bodies, but withoutdisproving it, it would seem impossible to continue studying thePtolemaic worlds. But even after the discovery of the law ofCopernicus the Ptolemaic worlds were still studied for... Long Stories - Post by : Mario - Author : Leo Tolstoy - Read : 2414

The Convent Gardener Of Lamporechio The Convent Gardener Of Lamporechio

The Convent Gardener Of Lamporechio
WHEN Cupid with his dart, would hearts assail, The rampart most secure is not the VEIL; A husband better will the FAIR protect, Than walls or lattices, I much suspect. Those parents, who in nunneries have got Their daughters (whether willingly or not), Most clearly in a glaring error prove, To fancy God will round their actions move; 'Tis an abuse of what we hold divine; The Devil with them surely must combine. Besides, 'twere folly to suppose that vice Ne'er entered convent walls, and nuns were... Poems - Post by : Austin - Author : Jean De La Fontaine - Read : 2177

The Valley Of Fear - PART 2 The Scowrers - Chapter 3 Lodge 341, Vermissa The Valley Of Fear - PART 2 The Scowrers - Chapter 3 Lodge 341, Vermissa

The Valley Of Fear - PART 2 The Scowrers - Chapter 3 Lodge 341, Vermissa
On the day following the evening which had contained so manyexciting events, McMurdo moved his lodgings from old JacobShafter's and took up his quarters at the Widow MacNamara'son the extreme outskirts of the town. Scanlan, his originalacquaintance aboard the train, had occasion shortly afterwards tomove into Vermissa, and the two lodged together. There was noother boarder, and the hostess was an easy-going old Irishwomanwho left them to themselves; so that they had a freedom forspeech and action... Long Stories - Post by : Roy_Adriaan - Author : Arthur Conan Doyle - Read : 3000

The Professor - Preface The Professor - Preface

The Professor - Preface
This little book was written before either "Jane Eyre" or"Shirley," and yet no indulgence can be solicited for it on theplea of a first attempt. A first attempt it certainly was not,as the pen which wrote it had been previously worn a good deal ina practice of some years. I had not indeed published anythingbefore I commenced "The Professor," but in many a crude effort,destroyed almost as soon as composed, I had got over any suchtaste as I might once have had for ornamented and redundantcomposition,... Long Stories - Post by : Dave_Smith - Author : Charlotte Bronte - Read : 2152

To A Certain Critic To A Certain Critic

To A Certain Critic
Such guests as you, sir, were not in my mindWhen I my homely dish with care designed;'Twas certain humble souls I would have fedWho do not turn from wholesome milk and bread:You came, slow-trotting on the narrow way,O'erturned the food, and trod it in the clay;Then low with discoid nostrils sniffing curt,Cried, "Sorry cook! why, what a mess of dirt!"(The end)George MacDonald's poem: To A Certain Critic... Poems - Post by : hlatt - Author : George Macdonald - Read : 1454

Uncle Tom's Cabin - Volume I - Chapter XVI - Tom's Mistress and Her Opinions Uncle Tom's Cabin - Volume I - Chapter XVI - Tom's Mistress and Her Opinions

Uncle Tom's Cabin - Volume I - Chapter XVI - Tom's Mistress and Her Opinions
"And now, Marie," said St. Clare, "your golden days are dawning. Here is our practical, business-like New England cousin, who willtake the whole budget of cares off your shoulders, and give youtime to refresh yourself, and grow young and handsome. The ceremonyof delivering the keys had better come off forthwith."This remark was made at the breakfast-table, a few morningsafter Miss Ophelia had arrived."I'm sure she's welcome," said Marie, leaning her headlanguidly on her hand. "I think she'll find... Long Stories - Post by : Ann_C. - Author : Harriet Beecher Stowe - Read : 3283

Uncle Tom's Cabin - Volume II - Chapter XXI - Kentuck Uncle Tom's Cabin - Volume II - Chapter XXI - Kentuck

Uncle Tom's Cabin - Volume II - Chapter XXI - Kentuck
Our readers may not be unwilling to glance back, for abrief interval, at Uncle Tom's Cabin, on the Kentucky farm, andsee what has been transpiring among those whom he had left behind.It was late in the summer afternoon, and the doors andwindows of the large parlor all stood open, to invite any straybreeze, that might feel in a good humor, to enter. Mr. Shelby satin a large hall opening into the room, and running through thewhole length of the house, to a balcony on either end. Leisurelytipped back... Long Stories - Post by : marketingtest - Author : Harriet Beecher Stowe - Read : 1378

Uncle Tom's Cabin - Volume II - Chapter XLI - The Young Master Uncle Tom's Cabin - Volume II - Chapter XLI - The Young Master

Uncle Tom's Cabin - Volume II - Chapter XLI - The Young Master
Two days after, a young man drove a light wagon up throughthe avenue of China trees, and, throwing the reins hastily on thehorse's neck, sprang out and inquired for the owner of the place.It was George Shelby; and, to show how he came to be there,we must go back in our story.The letter of Miss Ophelia to Mrs. Shelby had, by someunfortunate accident, been detained, for a month or two, at someremote post-office, before it reached its destination; and, ofcourse, before it was received, Tom was already... Long Stories - Post by : etools4biz - Author : Harriet Beecher Stowe - Read : 1173

Lady Susan - LETTER XVII - MRS. VERNON TO LADY DE COURCY Lady Susan - LETTER XVII - MRS. VERNON TO LADY DE COURCY

Lady Susan - LETTER XVII - MRS. VERNON TO LADY DE COURCY
Churchhill. My dear Mother,--Mr. Vernon returned on Thursday night, bringing his niece with him. Lady Susan had received a line from him by that day's post, informing her that Miss Summers had absolutely refused to allow of Miss Vernon's continuance in her academy; we were therefore prepared for her arrival, and expected them impatiently the whole evening. They came while we were at tea, and I never saw any creature look so frightened as Frederica when she entered the room. Lady Susan, who had been... Long Stories - Post by : malistor - Author : Jane Austen - Read : 973

The Three Musketeers - Chapter 8. Concerning A Court Intrigue The Three Musketeers - Chapter 8. Concerning A Court Intrigue

The Three Musketeers - Chapter 8. Concerning A Court Intrigue
In the meantime, the forty pistoles of King Louis XIII, like all other things of this world, after having had a beginning had an end, and after this end our four companions began to be somewhat embarrassed. At first, Athos supported the association for a time with his own means. Porthos succeeded him; and thanks to one of those disappearances to which he was accustomed, he was able to provide for the wants of all for a fortnight. At last it became Aramis's turn, who performed it with a good grace... Long Stories - Post by : sammy - Author : Alexandre Dumas - Read : 3270

The Three Musketeers - Chapter 48. A Family Affair The Three Musketeers - Chapter 48. A Family Affair

The Three Musketeers - Chapter 48. A Family Affair
Athos had invented the phrase, family affair. A family affair was not subject to the investigation of the cardinal; a family affair concerned nobody. People might employ themselves in a family affair before all the world. Therefore Athos had invented the phrase, family affair. Aramis had discovered the idea, the lackeys. Porthos had discovered the means, the diamond. D'Artagnan alone had discovered nothing--he, ordinarily the most inventive of the four; but it must be also said that the very name... Long Stories - Post by : ambiance - Author : Alexandre Dumas - Read : 2567

The Web Of Life - Part 1 - Chapter 16 The Web Of Life - Part 1 - Chapter 16

The Web Of Life - Part 1 - Chapter 16
Part I Chapter XVI "Shall we walk over to the lake," the girl suggested gently, as if anxious to humor some incomprehensible child. "There is a lovely ravine we can explore, all cool and shady, and this sun is growing oppressive." Sommers accepted gratefully the concession she made to his unsocial mood. The ravine path revealed unexpected wildness and freshness. The peace of twilight had already descended there. Miss Hitchcock strolled on, apparently forgetful of fatigue, of the distance they were... Long Stories - Post by : Zaahn - Author : Robert Herrick - Read : 2269

Beowulf - Chapter XVI Beowulf - Chapter XVI

Beowulf - Chapter XVI
AND the lord of earls, to each that camewith Beowulf over the briny ways,an heirloom there at the ale-bench gave,precious gift; and the price {16a} bade payin gold for him whom Grendel erstmurdered, -- and fain of them more had killed,had not wisest God their Wyrd averted,and the man's {16b} brave mood. The Maker thenruled human kind, as here and now.Therefore is insight always best,and forethought of mind. How much awaits himof lief and of loath, who long time here,through days of warfare this world... Poems - Post by : justintime - Author : Unknown - Read : 1588

How To Live On 24 Hours A Day - Chapter VI - REMEMBER HUMAN NATURE, 56 How To Live On 24 Hours A Day - Chapter VI - REMEMBER HUMAN NATURE, 56

How To Live On 24 Hours A Day - Chapter VI - REMEMBER HUMAN NATURE, 56
I have incidentally mentioned the vast expanse of forty-four hours between leaving business at 2 p.m. on Saturday and returning to business at 10 a.m. on Monday. And here I must touch on the point whether the week should consist of six days or of seven. For many years--in fact, until I was approaching forty--my own week consisted of seven days. I was constantly being informed by older and wiser people that more work, more genuine living, could be got out of six days than out of seven.And it is... Nonfictions - Post by : desertfox - Author : Arnold Bennett - Read : 2082

Cast Adrift - Chapter XIX Cast Adrift - Chapter XIX

Cast Adrift - Chapter XIX
CHAPTER XIX. Mr. Dinneford visits the mission-school--A comparisonof the present with the past--The first mission-school--Reminiscences of the school in its early days--The zealousscholar--Good effects of the mission--"Get the burning brandsapart, or interpose incombustible things between them"--Anillustration--"Let in light, and the darkness flees"_MR. DINNEFORD had become deeply interested in the work that wasgoing on in Briar street, and made frequent visits to the missionhouse. Sometimes he took... Long Stories - Post by : The_Ezine_Team - Author : T. S. Arthur - Read : 2519