Full Online Books
BOOK CATEGORIES
Authors Authors Short Stories Short Stories Long Stories Long Stories Funny Stories Funny Stories Love Stories Love Stories Stories For Kids Stories For Kids Poems Poems Essays Essays Nonfictions Nonfictions Plays Plays Folktales Folktales Fairy Tales Fairy Tales Fables Fables Learning Kitchen Learning Kitchen
LINKS
Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional Free Classified Website Without Registration Free Classified Website Daniel Company
Twitter Twitter Add book
donate
Full Online Book Home
Famous Authors (View All Authors)

Vegetables - Creamed Peas And New Potatoes Vegetables - Creamed Peas And New Potatoes

Vegetables - Creamed Peas And New Potatoes
1-1/2 pounds very small red new potatoes, scrubbed carefully to remove the dirt, but leave the skin on, cut in 1/2 or 1/4ths 3 pounds fresh peas, shelled, will end up being about 2-1/2 cups 2 Tablespoons thinly sliced green onions 1-1/2 cups boiling water 1-1/2 teaspoons salt 3/4 cup evaporated milk or fresh cream 3 Tablespoons butter Place the potatoes, shelled peas and onion into a saucepan, adding the boiling water and salt. Cover and cook for about 15 to 20 minutes until vegetables are tender.... Learning Kitchen - Post by : nhusss - Author : Unknown - Read : 2827

The Gambler - XIII The Gambler - XIII

The Gambler - XIII
XIIIAlmost a month has passed since I last touched these notes-- notes which I began under the influence of impressions at once poignant and disordered. The crisis which I then felt to be approaching has now arrived, but in a form a hundred times more extensive and unexpected than I had looked for. To me it all seems strange, uncouth, and tragic. Certain occurrences have befallen me which border upon the marvellous. At all events, that is how I view them. I view them so in one regard at least. I... Long Stories - Post by : Julie_Kerr - Author : Fyodor Dostoyevsky - Read : 3094

The Possessed - PART III - Chapter II. THE END OF THE FETE The Possessed - PART III - Chapter II. THE END OF THE FETE

The Possessed - PART III - Chapter II. THE END OF THE FETE
PART III - CHAPTER II. THE END OF THE FETEHE WOULD NOT SEE ME. He had shut himself up and was writing. At my repeated knocks and appeals he answered through the door:'My friend, I have finished everything. Who can ask anything more of me?''You haven't finished anything, you've only helped to make a mess of the whole thing. For God's sake, no epigrams, Stepan Trofimovitch! Open the door. We must take steps; they may still come and insult you. . . .'I thought myself entitled to be particularly severe... Long Stories - Post by : sev7en - Author : Fyodor Dostoyevsky - Read : 1054

The Fair Maid Of Perth, Or St. Valentine's Day - Chapter XVI The Fair Maid Of Perth, Or St. Valentine's Day - Chapter XVI

The Fair Maid Of Perth, Or St. Valentine's Day - Chapter XVI
CHAPTER XVIOn Fastern's E'en when we war fou.Scots Song.The night which sunk down on the sickbed of Ramorny was not doomed to be a quiet one. Two hours had passed since curfew bell, then rung at seven o'clock at night, and in those primitive times all were retired to rest, excepting such whom devotion, or duty, or debauchery made watchers; and the evening being that of Shrovetide, or, as it was called in Scotland, Fastern's E'en, the vigils of gaiety were by far the most frequented of the three.The... Long Stories - Post by : markh - Author : Sir Walter Scott - Read : 2981

Journal Of Sir Walter Scott From Original Manuscript At Abbotsford - Volume I, 1827 - MARCH Journal Of Sir Walter Scott From Original Manuscript At Abbotsford - Volume I, 1827 - MARCH

Journal Of Sir Walter Scott From Original Manuscript At Abbotsford - Volume I, 1827 - MARCH
VOLUME I, 1827 - MARCH_March 1.--At Court until two--wrote letters under cover of the lawyers' long speeches, so paid up some of my correspondents, which I seldom do upon any other occasion. I sometimes let letters lie for days unopened, as if that would postpone the necessity of answering them. Here I am at home, and to work we go--not for the first time to-day, for I wrought hard before breakfast. So glides away Thursday 1st. By the by, it is the anniversary of Bosworth Field. In former days _Richard... Nonfictions - Post by : onlinehomebiz - Author : Sir Walter Scott - Read : 3041

Waverley, Or 'tis Sixty Years Hence - Volume I - Chapter V - CHOICE OF A PROFESSION Waverley, Or 'tis Sixty Years Hence - Volume I - Chapter V - CHOICE OF A PROFESSION

Waverley, Or 'tis Sixty Years Hence - Volume I - Chapter V - CHOICE OF A PROFESSION
VOLUME I - CHAPTER V - CHOICE OF A PROFESSIONFrom the minuteness with which I have traced Waverley's pursuits, and the bias which these unavoidably communicated to his imagination, the reader may perhaps anticipate, in the following tale, an imitation of the romance of Cervantes. But he will do my prudence injustice in the supposition. My intention is not to follow the steps of that inimitable author, in describing such total perversion of intellect as misconstrues the objects actually presented... Long Stories - Post by : Mike_Calvert - Author : Sir Walter Scott - Read : 2329

Waverley, Or 'tis Sixty Years Hence - Volume I - Chapter XX - A HIGHLAND FEAST Waverley, Or 'tis Sixty Years Hence - Volume I - Chapter XX - A HIGHLAND FEAST

Waverley, Or 'tis Sixty Years Hence - Volume I - Chapter XX - A HIGHLAND FEAST
VOLUME I - CHAPTER XX - A HIGHLAND FEASTEre Waverley entered the banqueting hall, he was offered the patriarchal refreshment of a bath for the feet, which the sultry weather, and the morasses he had traversed, rendered highly acceptable. He was not, indeed, so luxuriously attended upon this occasion as the heroic travellers in the Odyssey; the task of ablution and abstersion being performed, not by a beautiful damsel, trainedTo chafe the limb, and pour the fragrant oil,but by a smoke-dried skinny... Long Stories - Post by : newuser - Author : Sir Walter Scott - Read : 2087

Waverley, Or 'tis Sixty Years Hence - Volume I - Chapter XXVII - UPON THE SAME SUBJECT Waverley, Or 'tis Sixty Years Hence - Volume I - Chapter XXVII - UPON THE SAME SUBJECT

Waverley, Or 'tis Sixty Years Hence - Volume I - Chapter XXVII - UPON THE SAME SUBJECT
VOLUME I - CHAPTER XXVII - UPON THE SAME SUBJECTFergus Mac-Ivor had too much tact and delicacy to renew the subject which he had interrupted. His head was, or appeared to be, so full of guns, broadswords, bonnets, canteens, and tartan hose that Waverley could not for some time draw his attention to any other topic.'Are you to take the field so soon, Fergus,' he asked, 'that you are making all these martial preparations?''When we have settled that you go with me, you shall know all; but otherwise,... Long Stories - Post by : imported_n/a - Author : Sir Walter Scott - Read : 704

Eben Holden: A Tale Of The North Country - BOOK ONE - Chapter 10 Eben Holden: A Tale Of The North Country - BOOK ONE - Chapter 10

Eben Holden: A Tale Of The North Country - BOOK ONE - Chapter 10
BOOK ONE - Chapter 10Uncle Eb was a born lover of fun. But he had a solemn way of fishing that was no credit to a cheerful man. It was the same when he played the bass viol, but that was also a kind of fishing at which he tried his luck in a roaring torrent of sound. Both forms of dissipation gave him a serious look and manner, that came near severity. They brought on his face only the light of hope and anticipation or the shadow of disappointment.We had finished our stent early the day of which... Long Stories - Post by : closer1138 - Author : Irving Bacheller - Read : 652

The Rose And The Ring - XIX. AND NOW WE COME TO THE LAST SCENE IN THE PANTOMIME The Rose And The Ring - XIX. AND NOW WE COME TO THE LAST SCENE IN THE PANTOMIME

The Rose And The Ring - XIX. AND NOW WE COME TO THE LAST SCENE IN THE PANTOMIME
XIX. AND NOW WE COME TO THE LAST SCENE IN THE PANTOMIMEThe many ups and downs of her life had given the Princess Rosalba prodigious strength of mind, and that highly principled young woman presently recovered from her fainting-fit, out of which Fairy Blackstick, by a precious essence which the Fairy always carried in her pocket, awakened her. Instead of tearing her hair, crying, and bemoaning herself, and fainting again, as many young women would have done, Rosalba remembered that she owed an example... Long Stories - Post by : deltadawnw - Author : William Makepeace Thackeray - Read : 1525

Vanity Fair - Chapter LXIII. In Which We Meet an Old Acquaintance Vanity Fair - Chapter LXIII. In Which We Meet an Old Acquaintance

Vanity Fair - Chapter LXIII. In Which We Meet an Old Acquaintance
Such polite behaviour as that of Lord Tapeworm did not fail to have the most favourable effect upon Mr. Sedley's mind, and the very next morning, at breakfast, he pronounced his opinion that Pumpernickel was the pleasantest little place of any which he had visited on their tour. Jos's motives and artifices were not very difficult of comprehension, and Dobbin laughed in his sleeve, like a hypocrite as he was, when he found, by the knowing air of the civilian and the offhand manner in which the latter... Long Stories - Post by : veronica - Author : William Makepeace Thackeray - Read : 1525

The Virginians - Chapter LVII. In which Mr. Harry's Nose continues to be put out of joint The Virginians - Chapter LVII. In which Mr. Harry's Nose continues to be put out of joint

The Virginians - Chapter LVII. In which Mr. Harry's Nose continues to be put out of joint
Madame de Bernstein was scarcely less pleased than her Virginian nephews at the result of Harry's final interview with Lady Maria. George informed the Baroness of what had passed, in a billet which he sent to her the same evening; and shortly afterwards her nephew Castlewood, whose visits to his aunt were very rare, came to pay his respects to her, and frankly spoke about the circumstances which had taken place; for no man knew better than my Lord Castlewood how to be frank upon occasion, and now... Long Stories - Post by : E-Butler - Author : William Makepeace Thackeray - Read : 2907

The Newcomes - Chapter I. The Overture The Newcomes - Chapter I. The Overture

The Newcomes - Chapter I. The Overture
CHAPTER I. The Overture--After which the Curtain rises upon a Drinking ChorusA crow, who had flown away with a cheese from a dairy-window, sate perched on a tree looking down at a great big frog in a pool underneath him. The frog's hideous large eyes were goggling out of his head in a manner which appeared quite ridiculous to the old blackamoor, who watched the splay-footed slimy wretch with that peculiar grim humour belonging to crows. Not far from the frog a fat ox was browsing; whilst a few lambs... Long Stories - Post by : James_Barone - Author : William Makepeace Thackeray - Read : 3410

The History Of The Next French Revolution - Chapter VIII. THE BATTLE OF THE FORTS The History Of The Next French Revolution - Chapter VIII. THE BATTLE OF THE FORTS

The History Of The Next French Revolution - Chapter VIII. THE BATTLE OF THE FORTS
On the morning of the 26th October, 1884, as his Majesty Louis Philippe was at breakfast reading the Debats newspaper, and wishing that what the journal said about "Cholera Morbus in the Camp of the Pretender Henri,"--"Chicken-pox raging in the Forts of the Traitor Bonaparte,"--might be true, what was his surprise to hear the report of a gun; and at the same instant--whiz! came an eighty-four-pound ball through the window and took off the head of the faithful Monsieur de Montalivet, who was coming... Long Stories - Post by : wldcreek - Author : William Makepeace Thackeray - Read : 2499

The Silverado Squatters - PART II. WITH THE CHILDREN OF ISRAEL - Chapter VIII. A STARRY DRIVE The Silverado Squatters - PART II. WITH THE CHILDREN OF ISRAEL - Chapter VIII. A STARRY DRIVE

The Silverado Squatters - PART II. WITH THE CHILDREN OF ISRAEL - Chapter VIII. A STARRY DRIVE
In our rule at Silverado, there was a melancholy interregnum. The queen and the crown prince with one accord fell sick; and, as I was sick to begin with, our lone position on Mount Saint Helena was no longer tenable, and we had to hurry back to Calistoga and a cottage on the green. By that time we had begun to realize the difficulties of our position. We had found what an amount of labour it cost to support life in our red canyon; and it was the dearest desire of our hearts to get a China-boy to... Long Stories - Post by : schiffst - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2830

In The South Seas - PART IV. THE GILBERTS - APEMAMA - Chapter VI. THE KING OF APEMAMA: DEVIL-WORK In The South Seas - PART IV. THE GILBERTS - APEMAMA - Chapter VI. THE KING OF APEMAMA: DEVIL-WORK

In The South Seas - PART IV. THE GILBERTS - APEMAMA - Chapter VI. THE KING OF APEMAMA: DEVIL-WORK
The ocean beach of Apemama was our daily resort. The coast is broken by shallow bays. The reef is detached, elevated, and includes a lagoon about knee-deep, the unrestful spending-basin of the surf. The beach is now of fine sand, now of broken coral. The trend of the coast being convex, scarce a quarter of a mile of it is to be seen at once; the land being so low, the horizon appears within a stone-cast; and the narrow prospect enhances the sense of privacy. Man avoids the place--even his footprints... Nonfictions - Post by : Jeannine79 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 3419

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 23. The Time Is at Hand Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 23. The Time Is at Hand

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 23. The Time Is at Hand
THE YOUNG can sink into abysses of despondency, and it was so with Noel and me now; but the hopes of the young are quick to rise again, and it was so with ours. We called back that vague promise of the Voices, and said the one to the other that the glorious release was to happen at "the last moment"--"that other time was not the last moment, but this is; it will happen now; the King will come, La Hire will come, and with them our veterans, and behind them all France!" And so we were full of heart... Long Stories - Post by : mkollerup - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 2202

Margaret Smith's Journal In The Province Of Massachusetts Bay, 1678-9 - BOSTON, May 8, 1678 Margaret Smith's Journal In The Province Of Massachusetts Bay, 1678-9 - BOSTON, May 8, 1678

Margaret Smith's Journal In The Province Of Massachusetts Bay, 1678-9 - BOSTON, May 8, 1678
I remember I did promise my kind Cousin Oliver (whom I pray God to have always in his keeping), when I parted with him nigh unto three months ago, at mine Uncle Grindall's, that, on coming to this new country, I would, for his sake and perusal, keep a little journal of whatsoever did happen both unto myself and unto those with whom I might sojourn; as also, some account of the country and its marvels, and mine own cogitations thereon. So I this day make a beginning of the same; albeit, as my cousin... Long Stories - Post by : magellon - Author : John Greenleaf Whittier - Read : 1555

Margaret Smith's Journal In The Province Of Massachusetts Bay, 1678-9 - June 1 Margaret Smith's Journal In The Province Of Massachusetts Bay, 1678-9 - June 1

Margaret Smith's Journal In The Province Of Massachusetts Bay, 1678-9 - June 1
Mr. Michael Wigglesworth, the Malden minister, at uncle's house last night. Mr. Wigglesworth told aunt that he had preached a sermon against the wearing of long hair and other like vanities, which he hoped, with God's blessing, might do good. It was from Isaiah iii. 16, and so on to the end of the chapter. Now, while he was speaking of the sermon, I whispered Rebecca that I would like to ask him a question, which he overhearing, turned to me, and bade me never heed, but speak out. So I told him that... Long Stories - Post by : George_Sepich - Author : John Greenleaf Whittier - Read : 3305

The Third Violet - Chapter 31 The Third Violet - Chapter 31

The Third Violet - Chapter 31
CHAPTER XXXI.In the evening Pennoyer conducted Florinda to the flat of many fire-escapes. After a period of silent tramping through the great golden avenue and the street that was being repaired, she said, "Penny, you are very good to me.""Why?" said Pennoyer."Oh, because you are. You--you are very good to me, Penny.""Well, I guess I'm not killing myself.""There isn't many fellows like you.""No?""No. There isn't many fellows like you, Penny. I tell you 'most everything, and you just listen, and don't... Long Stories - Post by : ItsSnowing - Author : Stephen Crane - Read : 1828