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The Adventures Of Captain Horn - Chapter 36. A Horse-Dealer Appears On The Scene The Adventures Of Captain Horn - Chapter 36. A Horse-Dealer Appears On The Scene

The Adventures Of Captain Horn - Chapter 36. A Horse-Dealer Appears On The Scene
CHAPTER XXXVI. A HORSE-DEALER APPEARS ON THE SCENEWhen the brig _Miranda was lying at anchor in the Rackbirds' cove, and Mr. George Burke had silently left her in order to go on shore and pursue some investigations in which he was interested, his departure from the brig had not been, as he supposed, unnoticed. The big, good-natured African, known as Inkspot, had been on watch, and, being himself so very black that he was not generally noticeable in the dark, was standing on a part of the deck from... Long Stories - Post by : Joe_Coon - Author : Frank R Stockton - Read : 3148

The Yellow God - Chapter 17. The End Of The Mungana The Yellow God - Chapter 17. The End Of The Mungana

The Yellow God - Chapter 17. The End Of The Mungana
CHAPTER XVII. THE END OF THE MUNGANAThe moonlight above vanished. Alan was alone in the depths with this devil, or whatever it might be. He could feel hands and feet gripping and treading on him, but they did not seem to be human, for there were too many of them. Also they were very cold. He gave himself up for dead and thought of Barbara.Then something flashed into his mind. In his hand he still held the revolver. He pressed it upwards against the thing that was smothering him, and pulled the trigger.... Long Stories - Post by : ow24160 - Author : H. Rider Haggard - Read : 1056

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 10. My Visit To The Barricade The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 10. My Visit To The Barricade

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 10. My Visit To The Barricade
CHAPTER X. MY VISIT TO THE BARRICADEMy coachman deposited me at the corner of Saint Eustache, and said to me, "Here you are in the hornets' nest."He added, "I will wait for you in the Rue de la Vrilliere, near the Place des Victoires. Take your time."I began walking from barricade to barricade.In the first I met De Flotte, who offered to serve me as a guide. There is not a more determined man than De Flotte. I accepted his offer; he took me everywhere where my presence could be of use.On the way... Long Stories - Post by : rlscott - Author : Victor Hugo - Read : 2566

The Age Of Wisdom The Age Of Wisdom

The Age Of Wisdom
Ho, pretty page, with the dimpled chin, That never has known the Barber's shear,All your wish is woman to win,This is the way that boys begin,-- Wait till you come to Forty Year.Curly gold locks cover foolish brains, Billing and cooing is all your cheer;Sighing and singing of midnight strains,Under Bonnybell's window panes,-- Wait till you come to Forty Year.Forty times over let Michaelmas pass, Grizzling hair the brain doth clear--Then you know a boy is an ass,Then you know the worth of a lass,... Poems - Post by : Richard_Cuss - Author : William Makepeace Thackeray - Read : 2194

Not Yet, My Soul, These Friendly Fields Desert Not Yet, My Soul, These Friendly Fields Desert

Not Yet, My Soul, These Friendly Fields Desert
Not yet, my soul, these friendly fields desert,Where thou with grass, and rivers, and the breeze,And the bright face of day, thy dalliance hadst;Where to thine ear first sang the enraptured birds;Where love and thou that lasting bargain made.The ship rides trimmed, and from the eternal shoreThou hearest airy voices; but not yetDepart, my soul, not yet awhile depart.Freedom is far, rest far. Thou art with lifeToo closely woven, nerve with nerve intwined;Service still craving service, love for love,Love... Poems - Post by : venomous012u - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1975

The Voice Of The Thorn The Voice Of The Thorn

The Voice Of The Thorn
IWhen the thorn on the downQuivers naked and cold,And the mid-aged and oldPace the path there to town,In these words dry and drearIt seems to them sighing:"O winter is tryingTo sojourners here!"IIWhen it stands fully tressedOn a hot summer day,And the ewes there astrayFind its shade a sweet rest,By the breath of the breezeIt inquires of each farer:"Who would not be sharerOf shadow with these?"IIIBut by day or by night,And in winter or summer,Should I be the comerAlong that lone height,In its voicing... Poems - Post by : plinks - Author : Thomas Hardy - Read : 386

In Childbed In Childbed

In Childbed
In the middle of the nightMother's spirit came and spoke to me, Looking weariful and white -As 'twere untimely news she broke to me. "O my daughter, joyed are youTo own the weetless child you mother there; 'Men may search the wide world through,'You think, 'nor find so fair another there!' "Dear, this midnight time unwombsThousands just as rare and beautiful; Thousands whom High Heaven foredoomsTo be as bright, as good, as dutiful. "Source of ecstatic hopes and fearsAnd innocent maternal vanity,... Poems - Post by : mohausa - Author : Thomas Hardy - Read : 3020

War And Peace - Book Two: 1805 - Chapter 18 War And Peace - Book Two: 1805 - Chapter 18

War And Peace - Book Two: 1805 - Chapter 18
Prince Bagration, having reached the highest point of our rightflank, began riding downhill to where the roll of musketry was heardbut where on account of the smoke nothing could be seen. The nearerthey got to the hollow the less they could see but the more theyfelt the nearness of the actual battlefield. They began to meetwounded men. One with a bleeding head and no cap was being draggedalong by two soldiers who supported him under the arms. There was agurgle in his throat and he was spitting blood.... Long Stories - Post by : wizard - Author : Leo Tolstoy - Read : 430

War And Peace - Book Eight: 1811-12 - Chapter 22 War And Peace - Book Eight: 1811-12 - Chapter 22

War And Peace - Book Eight: 1811-12 - Chapter 22
That same evening Pierre went to the Rostovs' to fulfill thecommission entrusted to him. Natasha was in bed, the count at theClub, and Pierre, after giving the letters to Sonya, went to MaryaDmitrievna who was interested to know how Prince Andrew had takenthe news. Ten minutes later Sonya came to Marya Dmitrievna."Natasha insists on seeing Count Peter Kirilovich," said she."But how? Are we to take him up to her? The room there has notbeen tidied up.""No, she has dressed and gone into the drawing... Long Stories - Post by : casken - Author : Leo Tolstoy - Read : 475

War And Peace - Book Nine: 1812 - Chapter 1 War And Peace - Book Nine: 1812 - Chapter 1

War And Peace - Book Nine: 1812 - Chapter 1
From the close of the year 1811 intensified arming and concentratingof the forces of Western Europe began, and in 1812 these forces-millions of men, reckoning those transporting and feeding the army-moved from the west eastwards to the Russian frontier, toward whichsince 1811 Russian forces had been similarly drawn. On the twelfthof June, 1812, the forces of Western Europe crossed the Russianfrontier and war began, that is, an event took place opposed tohuman reason and to human nature. Millions... Long Stories - Post by : ID3000 - Author : Leo Tolstoy - Read : 3275

War And Peace - Book Ten: 1812 - Chapter 3 War And Peace - Book Ten: 1812 - Chapter 3

War And Peace - Book Ten: 1812 - Chapter 3
When Michael Ivanovich returned to the study with the letter, theold prince, with spectacles on and a shade over his eyes, wassitting at his open bureau with screened candles, holding a paper inhis outstretched hand, and in a somewhat dramatic attitude was readinghis manuscript- his "Remarks" as he termed it- which was to betransmitted to the Emperor after his death.When Michael Ivanovich went in there were tears in the prince's eyesevoked by the memory of the time when the paper he was now reading... Long Stories - Post by : chipper - Author : Leo Tolstoy - Read : 1949

War And Peace - Book Twelve: 1812 - Chapter 15 War And Peace - Book Twelve: 1812 - Chapter 15

War And Peace - Book Twelve: 1812 - Chapter 15
When Natasha opened Prince Andrew's door with a familiar movementand let Princess Mary pass into the room before her, the princess feltthe sobs in her throat. Hard as she had tried to prepare herself,and now tried to remain tranquil, she knew that she would be unable tolook at him without tears.The princess understood what Natasha had meant by the words: "twodays ago this suddenly happened." She understood those words to meanthat he had suddenly softened and that this softening and gentlenesswere... Long Stories - Post by : Beier - Author : Leo Tolstoy - Read : 2014

War And Peace - First Epilogue: 1813 - 20 - Chapter 6 War And Peace - First Epilogue: 1813 - 20 - Chapter 6

War And Peace - First Epilogue: 1813 - 20 - Chapter 6
At the beginning of winter Princess Mary came to Moscow. Fromreports current in town she learned how the Rostovs were situated, andhow "the son has sacrificed himself for his mother," as people weresaying."I never expected anything else of him," said Princess Mary toherself, feeling a joyous sense of her love for him. Remembering herfriendly relations with all the Rostovs which had made her almost amember of the family, she thought it her duty to go to see them. Butremembering her relations with... Long Stories - Post by : tbirdsall - Author : Leo Tolstoy - Read : 2368

Monica's Last Prayer (sonnet) Monica's Last Prayer (sonnet)

Monica's Last Prayer (sonnet)
"Ah, could thy grave at home, at Carthage, be!" _Care not for that, and lay me where I fall!_ _Everywhere heard will be the judgment-call;_ _But at God's altar, oh! remember me._ Thus Monica, and died in Italy. Yet fervent had her longing been, through all Her course, for home at last, and burial With her own husband, by the Libyan sea. Had been! but at the end, to her pure soul All tie with all beside seem'd vain and cheap, And union before God the only care. Creeds pass, rites change, no altar... Poems - Post by : williambrad - Author : Matthew Arnold - Read : 1003

Wuthering Heights - Chapter I Wuthering Heights - Chapter I

Wuthering Heights - Chapter I
1801. - I have just returned from a visit to my landlord - thesolitary neighbour that I shall be troubled with. This iscertainly a beautiful country! In all England, I do not believethat I could have fixed on a situation so completely removed fromthe stir of society. A perfect misanthropist's heaven: and Mr.Heathcliff and I are such a suitable pair to divide the desolationbetween us. A capital fellow! He little imagined how my heartwarmed towards him when I beheld his black eyes withdraw sosuspiciously... Long Stories - Post by : forunme - Author : Emily Bronte - Read : 3002

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XII Wuthering Heights - Chapter XII

Wuthering Heights - Chapter XII
WHILE Miss Linton moped about the park and garden, always silent,and almost always in tears; and her brother shut himself up amongbooks that he never opened - wearying, I guessed, with a continualvague expectation that Catherine, repenting her conduct, would comeof her own accord to ask pardon, and seek a reconciliation - andSHE fasted pertinaciously, under the idea, probably, that at everymeal Edgar was ready to choke for her absence, and pride alone heldhim from running to cast himself at her feet;... Long Stories - Post by : Brad_Karthauser - Author : Emily Bronte - Read : 2149

On Hearing The Princess Royal Sing On Hearing The Princess Royal Sing

On Hearing The Princess Royal Sing
On Hearing the Princess Royal(1) Sing("Dans ta haute demeure.")(Bk. III. ix., 1881.)In thine abode so high Where yet one scarce can breathe,Dear child, most tenderly A soft song thou dost wreathe.Thou singest, little girl-- Thy sire, the King is he:Around thee glories whirl, But all things sigh in thee.Thy thought may seek not wings Of speech; dear love's forbidden;Thy smiles, those heavenly things, Being faintly born, are chidden.Thou feel'st, poor little Bride, A hand unknown and chillClasp thine... Poems - Post by : alexander12 - Author : Victor Hugo - Read : 1872

The Count Of Monte Cristo - Chapter 27 - The Story The Count Of Monte Cristo - Chapter 27 - The Story

The Count Of Monte Cristo - Chapter 27 - The Story
"First, sir," said Caderousse, "you must make me a promise.""What is that?" inquired the abbe."Why, if you ever make use of the details I am about to giveyou, that you will never let any one know that it was I whosupplied them; for the persons of whom I am about to talkare rich and powerful, and if they only laid the tips oftheir fingers on me, I should break to pieces like glass.""Make yourself easy, my friend," replied the abbe. "I am apriest, and confessions die in my breast. Recollect, ouronly... Long Stories - Post by : clougo - Author : Alexandre Dumas - Read : 1853

My Lady Ludlow - Chapter IV My Lady Ludlow - Chapter IV

My Lady Ludlow - Chapter IV
I think my lady was not aware of Mr. Horner's views on education (asmaking men into more useful members of society), or the practice towhich he was putting his precepts in taking Harry Gregson as pupiland protege; if, indeed, she were aware of Harry's distinct existenceat all, until the following unfortunate occasion. The ante-room,which was a kind of business-place for my lady to receive her stewardand tenants in, was surrounded by shelves. I cannot call them book-shelves, though there were many... Long Stories - Post by : xxmisselissaxx - Author : Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell - Read : 359

North And South - Chapter XVI - THE SHADOW OF DEATH North And South - Chapter XVI - THE SHADOW OF DEATH

North And South - Chapter XVI - THE SHADOW OF DEATH
CHAPTER XVI - THE SHADOW OF DEATH 'Trust in that veiled hand, which leadsNone by the path that he would go;And always be for change prepared,For the world's law is ebb and flow.'FROM THE ARABIC.The next afternoon Dr. Donaldson came to pay his first visit toMrs. Hale. The mystery that Margaret hoped their late habits ofintimacy had broken through, was resumed. She was excluded fromthe room, while Dixon was admitted. Margaret was not a readylover, but where she loved she loved passionately, and with... Long Stories - Post by : vanyon - Author : Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell - Read : 2185